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10 hours ago, Arvedis said:

 

Haven't seen it yet, just the trailer. Wondering if you are referring to the Sierra sounds camp?  I have read a few different accounts of their experiences and don't recall them discussing non gibberish samurai sounds, which is what the film seems to cover?

 

Edit: answered my own question. Looks like he did more research with a different group after the initial Sierra sounds recordings.

 

It's worth watching and it's very different from the first one he put out. I didn't like the first one at all but decided to give this one a chance so I rented it.

 

Last part also is interesting being I know someone  that gave the same account as the woman interviewed while he was out hiking.

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Yes I am a favorite of the Sierra sounds grew up near there and have been to the camp sight of the recordings several times

On 7/14/2019 at 3:50 PM, wiiawiwb said:

The Sierra Camp sound recordings are fantastic. Worth the price of the film itself especially considering these were made in 1974.

 

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norseman
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2 hours ago, adam2323 said:

Yes I am a favorite of the Sierra sounds grew up near there and have been to the camp sight of the recordings several times

 

 

Did you hear anything strange?

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BFF Donor

Adam....how did you gain access to the camp? The movie/documentary indicated it was a spot whose location was kept under wraps by those who went there.

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On 9/16/2019 at 9:57 PM, wiiawiwb said:

Adam....how did you gain access to the camp? The movie/documentary indicated it was a spot whose location was kept under wraps by those who went there.

Hey Norse the location is in north eastern Tuolumne County Ca. I grew up there lived there my entire life. My dad lived there since the 1940’s. I learned the location from one from the Sardellas who own the pack station at Kennedy Meadows. That’s the where they were packed into the location from . My Dad and Joe Sardella are life long pals so he showed me the location one summer.

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norseman
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15 hours ago, adam2323 said:

Hey Norse the location is in north eastern Tuolumne County Ca. I grew up there lived there my entire life. My dad lived there since the 1940’s. I learned the location from one from the Sardellas who own the pack station at Kennedy Meadows. That’s the where they were packed into the location from . My Dad and Joe Sardella are life long pals so he showed me the location one summer.

 

Packing in by mule string! Very cool!

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SackScratch

One copy of Hunted on dvd for $50 on ebay! I'm not set up for downloading stuff and burning to dvd's, I prefer to just buy it on dvd!

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SackScratch
On 6/28/2019 at 4:01 PM, wiiawiwb said:

The movie on DVD just arrived. I'll report back after I've had a chance to watch it.

 

Where did you get the dvd? On Amazon it's download only and on eBay there's one dvd copy for $50.00 for sale!

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BFF Donor

I bought mine directly from a website:

 

https://www.nabigfootsearch.com/catalog/item/6180213/10412478.htm

 

More info about the Missing 411 series:

 

https://www.canammissing.com/missing-411--the-hunted.html

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Arvedis

Saw this and was surprised at how good it is.  Looks like Paulides hired a professional production company.

 

He openly discusses the paranormal in the end sequence (maybe an hour 20 mins in). He prefaces this sequence by saying it is not linked to missing persons cases. BF is not mentioned but a shimmering tree dweller that looks like "Saran wrap" is.

 

Also, a pretty good bit with Ron Morehead, who is usually very boring, at the old Sierra camp.

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Pressurecook

Just saw this. Have there been any other recordings of the “samurai chatter” since? From there or any other location?

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Just watched this finally tonight.  Don't know why I waited so long, I have Amazon Prime.  Probably because I am usually very busy with work and life and this isn't the type of show my wife would like, and almost all my TV watching we do together for many years.  Having torn my bicep distal tendon in June, requiring 2 surgeries, I have had more time of late recovering at home and should have watched this before tonight.  Anyway, I found the show very good.  The Montana part is intriguing, as the Crazy mountains are an hour an a half from where I live and I have meant to get to them to explore them sooner than later.  They are really a sight to behold travelling on I90 from the east to west - they stick out like "crazy" (haha) from the rockies to the south of I90.  I was not actually aware the Crazies are not part of the rockies and the youngest mountains in the contiguous US.  Very interesting.

 

My wifes grandparents own a cabin the crazies that we have never visited, but have been meaning to.  Now after watching this series we will be visiting.

 

The actual show itself was interesting, but really nothing to do with sasquatch until the sierra sounds part at the end.  Very interesting stuff though, and piques ones interest for sure.  Sorry for the jumbled typing, doing this with one hand sucks!

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Huntster
On 8/5/2019 at 1:40 PM, RedHawk454 said:

.........they all have a similar ending

 

someone disappears

SAR is called onto the scene

Storm comes after the disappearances and complicates and delays the search effort

 

The dudes got to have some ideas as to whats going on, but he never says.  

 

He's a former cop selling well known stuff as mystery:

 

People disappear with predictable regularity, they do that in wilderness areas at a higher rate, and this has been occurring since the dawn of human existence. Note that Otzi was found in an Alpine glacier some 5,000 years after he disappeared.

 

I write that as an Alaskan quite familiar with disappearance in the wilderness, almost disappeared myself on at least one occasion, and who just spent a classic, grueling 24 hour suicide run looking for a missing friend in the wilderness. Some details are warranted here:

 

My missing friend was two months shy of his 90th birthday, but was in excellent shape, and had spent the past 55 years of his life as an Alaskan outdoorsman. He was going to his homestead cabin near Slana for his annual spring visit there. His vehicle was found unlocked at the gravel pit trailhead, the keys were gone, his wallet was found in the vehicle, and his cabin was unlocked (lock hanging on the hasp, which was closed), and the windows were still boarded up. The Alaska State Troopers (eminently qualified and experienced in these matters) were called in 16 days after he was last seen in Slana where he stopped at a friend's house before hiking the 3 miles to the cabin from the trailhead. The Troopers searched for 4 days, and interviewed everybody involved and who lived in that little valley. They searched with a cadaver dog. They flew the area with a helicopter. 

 

When I spoke with the investigating Trooper a month ago, he asked if I was going into the area to search for myself. I told him that I might. He suggested I walk Bear Creek from the rugged "footbridge" down to its mouth at Slana Slough. He said that he saw a spot where the trail may have given away right near the bridge, and someone may have fallen into the creek, which would have been swollen with spring runoff. I fully understood his thoughts. Drowning and falls are the top killers in Alaska.

 

My wife has been a royal PITA for the past few years, and had a big part in not letting me go have a look. But finally getting all ducks in a row here at the household, and after my friend's remote neighbor called me and asked me to go with him to search the creek, my wife didn't have "my responsibilities" and "going alone" excuses anymore. Instead of going up there for a few days, the neighbor wanted to do the classic Alaskan "suicide run", which is the common term for leaving Anchorage after work, driving 4 hours to the Kenai River, catching a limit of salmon, then driving back for work the following morning. In this case, it was going to be a 5 hour drive each way, and a seven mile hike round trip on a rough, rarely used trail or on game trails. 

 

We found no trace at all of our friend. None. Zip. No footprints, no clothing, no gear, no trash, no body, no blood. Bear Creek eventually lead through a thicket so clogged with downed spruce trees and snags that I believe it impossible that a body could be forced through it without leaving some bits of clothing or his backpack on or in the snags. We found very little bear sign, too. Most of it was from last year, but I did find tracks left by a very large bear that might have been from early spring.

 

I have yet to write up a report for the Trooper and send with my pics, again, because Mrs. Huntster and my family need continued diaper changing 24/7, but in sum, my friend simply vanished. The most likely causes? I suggest these, in the order of my opined likelihood:

 

1) He fell into Bear Creek (swollen with spring runoff), drowned, was washed downstream, hung up on a snag, was fished out by a bear, and was carried off into the woods and consumed.

2) He was taken by a bear while walking in to his cabin, carried off into the woods, and consumed. (Yes, the idiot commonly walked in to his cabin unarmed despite the place being full of both black and brown bears, and despite knowing about more than one trouble bear in the area over the past 30+ years).

3) He was followed into the gravel pit by a criminal(s), or stumbled upon them upon his arrival, and taken before he ever left on foot for the cabin.

4) He was murdered by one of the kooky homesteaders of the area.

5) He became psychologically disoriented due to a sudden medical condition, or physically incapacitated while walking in, became lost, and either lays out there unfound, or was consumed by the wildlife.

 

Please note that sasquatches and extraterrestrials didn't make my list.........

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I think a interesting part of his books is when it actually involves toddlers that seem to travel great distances in a very short time.

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wiiawiwb
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11 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

He's a former cop selling well known stuff as mystery:

 

People disappear with predictable regularity, they do that in wilderness areas at a higher rate, and this has been occurring since the dawn of human existence. Note that Otzi was found in an Alpine glacier some 5,000 years after he disappeared.

 

I write that as an Alaskan quite familiar with disappearance in the wilderness, almost disappeared myself on at least one occasion, and who just spent a classic, grueling 24 hour suicide run looking for a missing friend in the wilderness. Some details are warranted here:

 

My missing friend was two months shy of his 90th birthday, but was in excellent shape, and had spent the past 55 years of his life as an Alaskan outdoorsman. He was going to his homestead cabin near Slana for his annual spring visit there. His vehicle was found unlocked at the gravel pit trailhead, the keys were gone, his wallet was found in the vehicle, and his cabin was unlocked (lock hanging on the hasp, which was closed), and the windows were still boarded up. The Alaska State Troopers (eminently qualified and experienced in these matters) were called in 16 days after he was last seen in Slana where he stopped at a friend's house before hiking the 3 miles to the cabin from the trailhead. The Troopers searched for 4 days, and interviewed everybody involved and who lived in that little valley. They searched with a cadaver dog. They flew the area with a helicopter. 

 

When I spoke with the investigating Trooper a month ago, he asked if I was going into the area to search for myself. I told him that I might. He suggested I walk Bear Creek from the rugged "footbridge" down to its mouth at Slana Slough. He said that he saw a spot where the trail may have given away right near the bridge, and someone may have fallen into the creek, which would have been swollen with spring runoff. I fully understood his thoughts. Drowning and falls are the top killers in Alaska.

 

My wife has been a royal PITA for the past few years, and had a big part in not letting me go have a look. But finally getting all ducks in a row here at the household, and after my friend's remote neighbor called me and asked me to go with him to search the creek, my wife didn't have "my responsibilities" and "going alone" excuses anymore. Instead of going up there for a few days, the neighbor wanted to do the classic Alaskan "suicide run", which is the common term for leaving Anchorage after work, driving 4 hours to the Kenai River, catching a limit of salmon, then driving back for work the following morning. In this case, it was going to be a 5 hour drive each way, and a seven mile hike round trip on a rough, rarely used trail or on game trails. 

 

We found no trace at all of our friend. None. Zip. No footprints, no clothing, no gear, no trash, no body, no blood. Bear Creek eventually lead through a thicket so clogged with downed spruce trees and snags that I believe it impossible that a body could be forced through it without leaving some bits of clothing or his backpack on or in the snags. We found very little bear sign, too. Most of it was from last year, but I did find tracks left by a very large bear that might have been from early spring.

 

I have yet to write up a report for the Trooper and send with my pics, again, because Mrs. Huntster and my family need continued diaper changing 24/7, but in sum, my friend simply vanished. The most likely causes? I suggest these, in the order of my opined likelihood:

 

1) He fell into Bear Creek (swollen with spring runoff), drowned, was washed downstream, hung up on a snag, was fished out by a bear, and was carried off into the woods and consumed.

2) He was taken by a bear while walking in to his cabin, carried off into the woods, and consumed. (Yes, the idiot commonly walked in to his cabin unarmed despite the place being full of both black and brown bears, and despite knowing about more than one trouble bear in the area over the past 30+ years).

3) He was followed into the gravel pit by a criminal(s), or stumbled upon them upon his arrival, and taken before he ever left on foot for the cabin.

4) He was murdered by one of the kooky homesteaders of the area.

5) He became psychologically disoriented due to a sudden medical condition, or physically incapacitated while walking in, became lost, and either lays out there unfound, or was consumed by the wildlife.

 

Please note that sasquatches and extraterrestrials didn't make my list.........

 

It's profoundly sad that your friend went missing and has never been found.  Closure is important to family and friends like yourself.  I can't imagine it.

 

That said, there are differences between his case and at least one of the cases in The Hunted.  For one, I suspect the FBI was not called in nor did they visit the site. They don't do that for adult hunters who go missing yet they were called in and did visit the site for several days in the Messick case. Why?

 

In Alaska, there are things that will kill you and drag you off. That would be evident if they knew exactly where your friend was when such an event took place. In the Messick case, everyone knew where he was. Any sign of a struggle would have stood out like a sore thumb. There were no such signs.  Also, his rifle was never found. How did that disappear?

 

 

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