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gigantor

Self Feeding Fire

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gigantor

This is a great idea when out camping...

 

 

 

for the slider...

 

 

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gigantor

and also...

 

 

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Catmandoo

The method shown by Dan Wowack works with dry wood in dry weather. The support--feed wood is hammered in a short distance away from the flames.  With wet, soaking wet everything, similar start with your favorite fire starter,  twigs, grass and small branches to build up heat. With blocking on sides, next layer with air gap,  across fire is small pieces of wood directly above flames/smoke. Depending on fuel, following layers are stacked and spaced for heat/ air flow.  Smaller wood dries faster.

 

However, summer is here and many of us will face campfire restrictions as in no campfires out side of regulated campgrounds =  no fires at 'dispersed' camping sites. Propane/butane should be good though. No smores, so take Moon Pie.

.

Edited by Catmandoo

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Madison5716

I'd like to try one of those. I'd also like to try he of the fires made of two lots as long as your body. Can't think of what it's called. But I'm stuck in the city without my truck. I'd hoped to get in a lot of camping this summer and now I'm not. Bummer.

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Catmandoo
56 minutes ago, Madison5716 said:

I'd also like to try he of the fires made of two lots as long as your body. Can't think of what it's called.

 

aka  'long fire',    long campfire'.  Plenty on you tube.   They use dry wood, not found in Oregon wood.

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norseman

Not found in western Oregon.....

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Catmandoo

^^^ Dan Wowak has a nice video concerning a self feeding fire. A video on long fires has been posted on the BFF and the use of dry wood was noted. Snow, cold and the wood is dry.  Western Washington, with wet, soggy wood during the times of snow and rain is a bit different.  I have seen campers bring  'presto-logs' to dispersed campsites.

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norseman
4 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

^^^ Dan Wowak has a nice video concerning a self feeding fire. A video on long fires has been posted on the BFF and the use of dry wood was noted. Snow, cold and the wood is dry.  Western Washington, with wet, soggy wood during the times of snow and rain is a bit different.  I have seen campers bring  'presto-logs' to dispersed campsites.

 

When we went elk hunting up at the dark divide at Lewis river. We brought E Wa fir and larch with us. Never saw so much water fall from the sky in one week in my life. Ridiculous.

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wiiawiwb

Great videos Gigantor, thank you. Another way to get a smokeless or stealthy fire is to make a Dakota fire pit.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlPSEfcz718

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtbGXfb6B1I

 

In a survival situation, you could make a narrow and long main fire pit and two air holes (YouTube #2) and burn wood until it has made a large, warm bed of coals. Then, shovel the dirt back on top of the coals and then lay on top of the covered hole. It will keep you warm for hours.

 

 

Edited by wiiawiwb

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