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hiflier

Zombie Deer Disease and Bigfoot

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hiflier

After looking at the map in this article I began to wonder if Bigfoot preying on deer or other ungulates in winter in those areas would be at risk for the disease. If they exist in say Colorado then my sense tells me that they would indeed be at risk. Humans too since cooking the meat of an affected deer doesn't reduce the risk in the slightest since if I remember correctly it takes extremely high temperatures, far above boiling even, to kill prions?:

 

https://www.cdc.gov/prions/cwd/occurrence.html

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Explorer

I was surprised to read the following about how this disease spreads (the highlighted area).

Before I read this, I was under the impression that you needed direct contact with the diseased animal or its fluids.

 

"Scientists believe CWD proteins (prions) likely spread between animals through body fluids like feces, saliva, blood, or urine, either through direct contact or indirectly through environmental contamination of soil, food or water. Once introduced into an area or farm, the CWD protein is contagious within deer and elk populations and can spread quickly. "

 

I doubt my water filter is good enough to filter contaminated water in these areas.

The article gives the impression that the threat is mainly to other deer and elk when drinking the water. I hope so.

 

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Huntster

I got a flesh eating bacterial infection on my hand just two months ago  after handling meat on a caribou hunt. It's 100% fatal if not treated, and 70% fatal if not treated promptly.

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hiflier

I didn't post the OP to scare anyone, only to help with awareness. If one looks t the map there are plenty of places with no issues. Ironically the places that look clear are the same areas that historically have had the most/longest reported BF activity. But I also think that this kind of awareness regarding the focus on CWD in deer and Elk in the sort of western Midwest is valuable knowledge should a researcher in any CWD prone areas just have to stumble upon a dead Sasquatch. The key would be to handle anything and everything as a sterile procedure to protect yourself. In fact it may be best to not go near the creature but notify the authorities instead much as most of say not to. Better to be safe than risk one's health.

 

W are all in this together and so watching out for each other and so posting cautions like this is always a good thing, right?

 

Huntster, glad you're ok. Things like that are not to be trifled with as you and now everyone here knows. Best to not delay if there's even a hint of uncertainty. BE SAFE! 

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georgerm

Hunster, I hope you get on this and your doctor makes a complete cure. 

 

Necrotizing fasciitis may be prevented with proper wound care and handwashing.[3] It is usually treated with surgery to remove the infected tissue, and intravenous antibiotics.[2][3] Often, a combination of antibiotics is used, such as penicillin G, clindamycin, vancomycin, and gentamicin [2]

 

 

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Huntster

I was incredibly lucky. The key was quick tissue removal before it grew too large and aggressive antibiotic treatment.

 

The Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game has been concerned with the spread of wasting disease into Alasja. To my knowledge it hasn't occurred yet, but it's just a matter if time. And there are other wildlife diseases that are a concern, too..........

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starchunk
4 hours ago, Huntster said:

I was incredibly lucky. The key was quick tissue removal before it grew too large and aggressive antibiotic treatment.

 

The Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game has been concerned with the spread of wasting disease into Alasja. To my knowledge it hasn't occurred yet, but it's just a matter if time. And there are other wildlife diseases that are a concern, too..........

 

With Alaska having moose also, do you see alot of Braingworm there?

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Huntster
47 minutes ago, starchunk said:

 

With Alaska having moose also, do you see alot of Braingworm there?

 

None, but ADFG is concerned that it will eventually show up.

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bipedalist
Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Explorer said:

I was surprised to read the following about how this disease spreads (the highlighted area).

Before I read this, I was under the impression that you needed direct contact with the diseased animal or its fluids.

 

"Scientists believe CWD proteins (prions) likely spread between animals through body fluids like feces, saliva, blood, or urine, either through direct contact or indirectly through environmental contamination of soil, food or water. Once introduced into an area or farm, the CWD protein is contagious within deer and elk populations and can spread quickly. "

 

I doubt my water filter is good enough to filter contaminated water in these areas.

The article gives the impression that the threat is mainly to other deer and elk when drinking the water. I hope so.

 

 

Prions cause several types of disease including the Cruetzfeldt-Jakobs  (BSE-mad cow) conditions too.   They can be spread through eating and contact with cut bones and tissues.  Watch those T bones--kidding.  Actually pretty rare variant.  

One cause:

By contamination. A small number of people have developed CJD after being exposed to infected human tissue during a medical procedure, such as a cornea or skin transplant. Also, because standard sterilization methods do not destroy abnormal prions, a few people have developed CJD after undergoing brain surgery with contaminated instruments.

Cases of CJD related to medical procedures are referred to as iatrogenic CJD. Variant CJD is linked primarily to eating beef infected with mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE).

 

Take care of yourself Huntster!

Edited by bipedalist

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hiflier

So the point of the OP is how CDW in deer and elk might possibly affect populations of Sasquatch , say in the Rockies, due to winter predation. The real point being what I said before: If a researcher finds a dead Sasquatch and is aware that CDW is possibly spreading in deer and elk herds in the area then how would one handle the situation. Because unless the body is tested there would be no way to determine if the creature succumbed to CDW from eating deer or elk meat. It's kind of a Catch 22 because tissue samples need to be handled in order to bring them in for testing, right? But the risk for someone in an area that has known CDW issues should mean that tissue samples shouldn't be attempted.

 

That's why I said that even though there is a good chance the specimen might just disappear it would still be best to notify authorities even if the odds are against any official disclosure of Sasquatch's existence. Would there be even a small chance that the find would make it to the public's attention through any official source or announcement. It your the researcher and you think the answer is "no", that an announcement would never happen, would you risk CDW and take a sample anyway? Or would you just document the scene and not touch the body and hope your documentation would be adequate? If CDW is in the deer/elk population would you think that the dead Sasquatch could possibly be dead because it could be a possible a victim of CDW? 

 

It's all hypothetical of course but if Sasquatch and CDW deer live in the same area and Sasquatches do prey on deer in winter then I would thing some caution should be taken with any dead Sasquatch. That's what I'm saying and that's why I'm asking for opinions on how would one handle the situation.    

Edited by hiflier

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Huntster

In my case with the caribou meat, I likely had a small knife cut on my knuckle for the bacteria to enter. I almost always get a minor cut or two field dressing animals. Stupidly, I carry surgical gloves in my game bag kit (primarily if I shoot a bear), but I never wear the gloves. I just don't like wearing gloves, even in cold weather. Dumb. I just paid the ER insurance deductible today (nearly $1K) with Mrs. Huntsters chiding still in my ears.

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Catmandoo
3 hours ago, hiflier said:

It's all hypothetical of course but if Sasquatch and CDW deer live in the same area and Sasquatches do prey on deer in winter then I would thing some caution should be taken with any dead Sasquatch. That's what I'm saying and that's why I'm asking for opinions on how would one handle the situation.

 

Very hypothetical. Still working the 'find the dead Sasquatch in the snowbank' angle.   Good luck with that. CWD has not been reported in Washington State so I think that I am OK.  I always wear nitrile gloves anyway. In summertime, my hands sweat and I leave a sweat trail. They know that it is me. 

Here is something for you to chew on HF.  Can a Sasquatch and other predators smell CWD on ungulates / other infected animals?   We have service animals that can detect illnesses.  Special dogs are noted to be able to detect about 6 illnesses / diseases including cancer.

Abnormal prion proteins give off 'signature' VOC's.  Human noses are lacking in sensitivity ( there are rare exceptions that can smell skin cell trails of dead people and a nose that can detect botulism ). Dog noses ( not the rude ones ) are impressive. I rate Sasquatch sense of smell far above canines. The question in your hypothetical scenario is whether or not a Sasquatch can smell diseased prey and leave it alone?  They will approach from downwind and get a good whiff of the prey.

 

I am launching you to figure out prion VOC's.  I smell a book coming.

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Arvedis
1 hour ago, Catmandoo said:

I smell

 

Plenty of zombie bigfoot literature out there.

 

 

 

51DBAobDSrL.jpg

Edited by Arvedis
  • Haha 1

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hiflier
6 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

I am launching you to figure out prion VOC's.  I smell a book coming

 

Already have a sequel going for the current novel but you bring up a good point regarding VOC's. One other question that might be worthy of consideration is bears that eat carrion or maybe other scavengers which may or may not smell VOC's if an animal already has the smell of death. Makes me wonder about other animals that might be at risk, like mountain lions. Not sure how far along a deer would have to be in the infection to even produce possible VOC's that might signal a predator to steer clear? I wouldn't think an animal would have to be in a state of full blown infection to be a danger. In that case VOC's may not be a factor in a predator's decision to attack and kill prey.

 

There are BF research groups in areas in and around Rocky Mountain areas so I thought it prudent to bring this subject up just in case they weren't aware of the of the risk even if it's only a small one. 

Edited by hiflier

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bipedalist

Stay away from eating snails and slugs likely source of transmission to white-tailed deer, it is interesting to think of the connoiseur BF and need for l'escargot in this case of culinary crud.  A brain worm parasite sounds like an ugly way to go in those cases.  The persistence of the organism and its ubiquitous nature is very troubling and would hope BF loses the bib on snails and slugs.  Hoping Les Stroud, Bear Grylis et al don't encourage the consumption of such.  

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