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Have there been reports out of the Bluff Creek Area in the last few years?


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MIB
On 3/3/2020 at 4:36 PM, BlackRockBigfoot said:

The number of people who will change their minds when presented with PGF trivia is negligible.  

 

I think that is true enough, but to explain to someone who is not "initiated" to the subject why you take it seriously, why you put your personal time into bigfoot instead of some other interest, I think it still has major impact.    You tell them that while for 50 years, nobody has been able to prove it is real, in those same 50 years, nobody has proven it is a hoax either and nobody has been able to duplicate the purported suit.    Then you show them.  It isn't always about the already made up minds you hope to change but rather the fence sitters  you want to understand your interest whether they believe when you're done or not.

 

MIB

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Huntster
On 3/2/2020 at 3:08 PM, Twist said:

Agreed, I think a spot could be hot for BF for 1 day, 1 week, or years.   My opinion is they are nomadic or migratory so there may be a pattern to their travel or not but I believe that a majority of them travel.  

 

I think this is a critical point to understand, and I have a theory on it:

 

I believe that a few/several families of sasquatches lived in the middle Klamath region prior to 1955 and for the past several thousand years. Their movement patterns were likely centered on seasonal climate (particularly rain and snow), anadromous fish runs, spring green-up, and the berry crop. The first major human pressure changes came with the gold rush, but it was the timber industry that really changed things permanently, because major road building was a huge part of that, roads brought so many more people, and increasing numbers of people continue to access the area because of those roads.

 

I believe that the homo sapien invasion of the Klamath tributaries ended the intensive use of the region by sasquatches that was the case prior to the roadbuilding. I'm also quite confident that has been the case in numerous other logged areas and the entire Puget Sound coastal ecoregion.I also believe that the overall sasquatch population has decreased dramatically in the PNW over the past 150 years as the homo sapien population in the region has exploded. I suspect that the remaining "high" sasquatch population densities are along the Coast Range in central and northern British Columbia and southeast Alaska panhandle. There are still pockets of sasquatch populations in the Rockies and more eastern parts of the continent, but I'm confident that they are dying out and/or migrating out, because these creatures simply do not want to share habitat with homo sapiens, and frankly, I can't blame them. Neither do I.

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hiflier

I can subscribe to your theory as it falls in line with where the Sasquatch "scene" seems to be nowadays. The nesting site in the OP occurred because it was a place where Human activity was almost non-existent for 50 years. It makes me realize the impact our presence in whatever capacity has on these creatures.

 

I also think the Bigfoot will put up with a lot on the short term but long term Human activity will get them eventually moving away. They may tolerate BF researchers in their habitat for a while but we read a lot where activity generally dries up after a period of time. A wake up call for us? Maybe it is.

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OldMort
5 hours ago, Huntster said:

but it was the timber industry that really changed things permanently, because major road building was a huge part of that, roads brought so many more people, and increasing numbers of people continue to access the area because of those roads.

 

Steven Streufert, the fellow who was instrumental in rediscovering the PGF film site a few years ago has mentioned in his writings that the Bluff Creek area sees far less activity these days than it did fifty years ago. Many of the old roads have fallen into disuse and have been abandoned. Others have been permanently closed by the Forest Service and are being retaken by nature. In fact the entire area is gated off from October until the snow melt in May or thereabouts. So, Bluff Creek is only accessible for half of the year at best. 

 

Streufert's group, the Bluff Creek Project have placed many trail-cams in the region over recent years.  So far, no luck...  

 

 

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Huntster

^^^^ All true, and that is a common trend throughout Forest Service lands that were intensively logged. This could very well cause sasquatches to move back into those areas........if their numbers haven't fallen too low.

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Doug

Along with the road building came the cutting down of vast areas of trees, exposing vast expanses of treeless land making it difficult to hide in.

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Backdoc

Assume Patty was real.  We could say at least in 1967 Bluff Creek met her needs.   For whatever reason, she moved on.  For most living things if the conditions are good they stay longer.  If not, they move on sooner than they may wish.  Maybe things changed.  Maybe development scared her out.  Maybe she went off to die.   Who knows?

 

The movie Jaws sums it up pretty well when it says:   Chief Brody: "Now this guy (Rogue Shark) sticks around while the feeding is good..."

 

What conditions lead to Bluff Creek being a place to go fish for one in 1967 and have success?    We know there were footprints in the region in those days so it makes sense the 'fishing was good' to use the analogy. 

 

Maybe if we could understand why Roger and Bob got lucky we might get lucky again. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Twist

I’d say if they got lucky it was because they followed up on a spot that had reports of recent activity.   
 

Researchers can follow up on activity being reported or they can research areas that appear “squatchy”.   I know which I’d prefer if I had my options.   
 

 

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wiiawiwb

I believe Samuel Goldwyn had it right when he said, "The harder I work, the luckier I get."

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adam2323

Having grew up in Northern California’s Sierra Nevada mountains (Tuolumne Co)

I can say that the northern part of the state both the Sierra’s and costal Mtn ranges still hold vast remote forested areas. And although maybe not the “hot spot” of the ‘60’s and ‘70’s; they still havr quite a bit of activity. Most of these are talked with among friends and never reported.

 

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vinchyfoot

Something may have happened during the PGF, since then, it seems quiet save for the area's exploitation.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Madison5716
On 7/23/2020 at 10:26 AM, Twist said:

I’d say if they got lucky it was because they followed up on a spot that had reports of recent activity.   

 

That's pretty much our plan. When nothing pans out with the follow- ups, we then just move on to explore areas that meet the criteria of forest cover, water year-round, evidence of game and far from humans. When we get a hit on the follow-up, we return there over and over to establish familiarity with the site, so that we can see differences and recognize them. Being consistent has paid off. I hope it continues!

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Twist
53 minutes ago, Madison5716 said:

 

That's pretty much our plan. When nothing pans out with the follow- ups, we then just move on to explore areas that meet the criteria of forest cover, water year-round, evidence of game and far from humans. When we get a hit on the follow-up, we return there over and over to establish familiarity with the site, so that we can see differences and recognize them. Being consistent has paid off. I hope it continues!

Hope so too, good luck!

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Backdoc

It makes sense the Bluff Creek area has gone cold if it actually has gone cold. I have no idea if it has I am only assuming it has due to no new Roger Patterson-type encounters.

 

Going with the idea Patty was a real creature/ real event, we have not had another PGF level encounter.  Yes, I realize we have several eye-witness reports from others in other areas and if they were fast enough on the draw then we would have another PGF level film to consider.   But taking bluff creek specifically (1960's to now), we know there has not been another PGF in regards to the bluff creek area.  So what does that tell us about Bluff Creek and maybe Patty in general?

 

Whatever the numbers, if there was an encounter at Bluff Creek and then nothing doesn't it means either:  1) Patty(s) has died off,  2) they moved out, or  3) the population mostly -but not entirely- died off and those alive moved out to other areas to they liked better.  I am assuming those areas were/are more remote areas.

 

Bluff Creek was Patty's favorite diner.  Then they changed ownership, raised the prices, and the food was bad.  Off she went. 

 

If we knew Patty's favorite food to her favorite color we could make a better educated guess.   We have to consider what Patty is telling us through her behavior.   

 

 

 

 

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