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slabdog

A Closer Look At The Sierra Sounds

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slabdog

I have not purchased the full Sierra Sounds CD, therefore I have not heard the entire Sierra Sounds audio .

The portions that I have heard however seem to be very high quality recordings.

The recordings, whatever they are, strike me as very clear.

Questions:

1 - Has anybody who has listened to the full length audio heard any other "sounds of nature" on the recordings? Such as birds, crickets, leaves rustling, wind etc?

2 - Does anybody know if Crypto-linguist Scott Nelson has provided the recordings to another crypto-linguists to independantly review?

3- Does anybody know how Ron Moorhead is affiliated with the following well know 911 recording?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j18Ayv5CC_k&playnext=1&list=PLC29E199C6711A32F

Edited by slabdog

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Bonehead74

I have heard the first Sierra Sounds CD narrated by Jonathan Frakes, but I don't own it. I do seem to recall bird cries and wind rustling in a few places, though it's been a while since I've heard it. Also, there is music playing in the background throughout the CD, which is very annoying. Supposedly Volume 2 omits the music, so I'm guessing that is where the vids above are from.

Not sure about Nelson, I figure if others are interested they shouldn't have a hard time getting a copy. If what he used were the original source recordings and not the Sierra Sounds CD, then he may not have permission to share.

From Sierra Sounds website: "Track 5 is a unique 911 call from a man residing in Washington state. Although it’s unrelated to the Sierra story it provides the listener with an interesting eyewitness account."

Edited by Bonehead74

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Guest

1 - Has anybody who has listened to the full length audio heard any other "sounds of nature" on the recordings? Such as birds, crickets, leaves rustling, wind etc?

2 - Does anybody know if Crypto-linguist Scott Nelson has provided the recordings to another crypto-linguists to independantly review?

3- Does anybody know how Ron Moorhead is affiliated with the following well know 911 recording?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j18Ayv5CC_k&playnext=1&list=PLC29E199C6711A32F

1 - I have heard the produced recordings years ago. One of the players (I believe Alan Berry - it's been a while), sent them to me. Very interesting. He also sent me a PDF of a university study done on the tapes. It was frankly over my head, but the gist of it was that the recordings were outside of the vocal range of a human. I don't recall hearing any other animals on the tapes. It was at a very high elevation, so crickets and the like probably wouldn't be in the area. It's been some time since I listened. I may have to listen again to see if I catch any other animals.

2 - A few months ago, Nelson had sent his mentor his work to get his opinion. I haven't heard since then.

3 - I don't believe Ron is associated with that call.

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RayG

2 - Does anybody know if Crypto-linguist Scott Nelson has provided the recordings to another crypto-linguists to independantly review?

Crypto-linguist = military translator

The true test of the validity of his work is by having it examined by actual linguists, not military translators.

To my knowledge only one PhD in Linguistics has taken a look at his work, and they thought it was beyond Nelson's area of expertise.

Next time anyone sees Nelson, ask him where he got his PhD in Linguistics.

RayG

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Guest

Crypto-linguist = military translator

The true test of the validity of his work is by having it examined by actual linguists, not military translators.

To my knowledge only one PhD in Linguistics has taken a look at his work, and they thought it was beyond Nelson's area of expertise.

Next time anyone sees Nelson, ask him where he got his PhD in Linguistics.

RayG

R. Scott Nelson retired from the U.S. Navy as a Crypto-Linguist with over 30 years experience in Foreign Language and Linguistics, including the collection, transcription, analysis and reporting of voice communications and has logged thousands of hours of voice transcription in his target languages as well as in Persian.

I fail to see how 30 years of experience with foriegn language and linguistics invalidates his work. The man was entrusted with matters of national security surely he has as much or more gravitas on linguistics as someone who holds a PhD.

I feel the bar slowly floating up.

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RayG

It's a question all footers should be asking him. If he isn't a PhD in Linguistics, how is it he's able to translate an unknown language into English?

Some bigfooters seem to be hanging on his every word, so to speak, regarding bigfoot language, and his interpretation of the Sierra Sounds, yet his background is that of a military translator, not an actual linguist.

I fail to see how 30 years of experience with foriegn language and linguistics invalidates his work. The man was entrusted with matters of national security surely he has as much or more gravitas on linguistics as someone who holds a PhD.

I feel the bar slowly floating up.

Digging a few ditches does not make one an engineer, any more than being fluent in a couple languages makes you a linguist.

Once again people are confusing the term cyrpto-linguist with being an actual linguist. A crypto-linguist is fluent in the language in which they were trained. They are, in effect, a translator/interpreter of that language. It gives them no special abilities to dissect an unknown language and convert it to English.

While you see the bar slowly floating up, I see otherwise intelligent people refusing to investigate further for fear they will expose the man behind the curtain.

RayG

Edited by RayG
  • Upvote 1

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Guest

It's a question all footers should be asking him. If he isn't a PhD in Linguistics, how is it he's able to translate an unknown language into English?

Some bigfooters seem to be hanging on his every word, so to speak, regarding bigfoot language, and his interpretation of the Sierra Sounds, yet his background is that of a military translator, not an actual linguist.

RayG

Not an actual linguist? Seriously?

R. Scott Nelson is a retired U.S. Navy Crypto-Linguist with over 30 years experience in Foreign Language and Linguistics, including the Collection, Transcription, Analysis and Reporting of voice communications.

He is a two time graduate of the U.S. Navy Cryptologic Voice Transcription School (Russian and Spanish) and has logged thousands of hours of voice transcription in his target languages as well as in Persian. He is currently teaching Russian, Spanish, Persian, Philosophy and Comparative Religions at Wentworth College in Missouri.

His pertinent Curriculum Vitae Follows:

R. Scott Nelson

Curriculum Vitae

Eleven years on the Faculty of Philosophy and Languages at Wentworth College,

Lexington, Missouri; teaching Russian, Persian and Spanish as well several Philosophy and Religion courses.

Retired U.S. Navy Cryptologic Technician Interpreter (Crypto-Linguist), worked for Naval Intelligence at the following duty stations: Naval Security Group Activity (NSGA), Rota, Spain; Naval Security Group Detachment Galeta Island, Panama; NSGA Homestead, Florida; NSGA Edzell, Scotland and aboard the following afloat units:

USS Coronado, USS Belknap, USS Deyo, USS Bigelow, USS Sphynx; serving in the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea and Persian Gulf.

Two time graduate of the Defense Language Institute, Foreign Language Center, Monterey, California (Russian and Spanish).

Two time graduate of the U.S. Navy Cryptologic Voice Transcription School at Naval Security Group Detachment (NSGD), San Angelo, Texas (Russian and Spanish).

Graduate of U.S. Navy Communications Intelligence Analysis and Reporting School at NSGD, San Angelo, Texas.

Acquired the Persian Language while assigned to afloat platforms in the Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf. These platforms had Persian as their primary target language.

Logged thousands of hours of collection and transcription of voice communications as a Cryptologic Interpreter for the U.S. Navy.

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RayG

Yes, seriously. I've read his resume. He's a translator/interpreter. Have YOU ever worked as a crypto-linguist? I have. I've known a few in my day too, and none of them would ever claim they could translate an unknown language into English.

RayG

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Guest

Yes, seriously. I've read his resume. He's a translator/interpreter. Have YOU ever worked as a crypto-linguist? I have. I've known a few in my day too, and none of them would ever claim they could translate an unknown language into English.

RayG

I typed a brilliant response, but it didn't take for some reason. We'll have to agree to disagree. With 30 years of experience studying language in the Navy and 11 years of teaching langauge at a college, I think that gives him more than enough credentials to not only be considered a linguist, but a well-informed linguist. He's been trained in grammar, syntax, semantics, origin, and phonetics in four languages if you include English. He just doesn't know these languages. He knows the practical applications of these langauges. Maybe we have a different idea of what a linguist is. I mean that sincerely, not as a slight towards you. I've been taught that a linguist studies language. Do you have a different interpretation?

Edited by rwridley

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Guest bsruther

In many instances, I would trust the opinion of the farmer down the road, before that of someone with a PhD in Agriculture.

I don't remember Scott Nelson claiming to translate BF language into anything. Actually in more than one of the videos, where I've listened to him, he's said that there's no way to know what they are saying. He does point out what appear to be english sounding words and the possibilities of that, but never claims them to be definable words.

Before Scott Nelson came along, I was skeptical of the Sierra sounds, but he's given them much more credibility, IMO. I believe that he has the skills and is completely capable of evaluating the tapes, but I would like to see the results from his peer that he spoke of.

The thing about the Sierra sounds that is most odd to me is nothing like it has been done since...kinda like PGF.

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Guest

In many instances, I would trust the opinion of the farmer down the road, before that of someone with a PhD in Agriculture.

I don't remember Scott Nelson claiming to translate BF language into anything. Actually in more than one of the videos, where I've listened to him, he's said that there's no way to know what they are saying. He does point out what appear to be english sounding words and the possibilities of that, but never claims them to be definable words.

Exactly. He hasn't done any translation. He's created a phonetic alaphabet just so researchers could mimic the sounds, but he hasn't applied any meaning to the words.

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RayG

Do you have a different interpretation?

Yes. I see nothing in Nelson's resume that indicates anything more than an ability to learn, speak, and teach a foreign language. I see nothing there that indicates he's a specialist who studies linguistics. Big difference, one which some footers either won't or don't recognize. My high school french teach was no linguist, nor is my daughter who is fluent in french. Nelson was a military translator, someone who intercepted, and copied foreign voice transmissions, and was eventually skilled enough to transcribe and translates those foreign voice transmissions. Nelson did with Russian and Spanish what my daughter can do with French. He was not and is not trained to translate languages he has not himself learned. In my opinion the 'crypto-linguist' label is a big red herring.

...I would like to see the results from his peer that he spoke of.

As would I, but we'd need to define who these peers would be. Another person who has the capacity to learn and speak a foreign language, like Nelson, or a specialist who studies linguistics, like Noam Chomsky? Personally, I'd like to see the ones like Chomsky voice their opinions.

RayG

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Yes. I see nothing in Nelson's resume that indicates anything more than an ability to learn, speak, and teach a foreign language. I see nothing there that indicates he's a specialist who studies linguistics. Big difference, one which some footers either won't or don't recognize. My high school french teach was no linguist, nor is my daughter who is fluent in french. Nelson was a military translator, someone who intercepted, and copied foreign voice transmissions, and was eventually skilled enough to transcribe and translates those foreign voice transmissions. Nelson did with Russian and Spanish what my daughter can do with French. He was not and is not trained to translate languages he has not himself learned. In my opinion the 'crypto-linguist' label is a big red herring.

As would I, but we'd need to define who these peers would be. Another person who has the capacity to learn and speak a foreign language, like Nelson, or a specialist who studies linguistics, like Noam Chomsky? Personally, I'd like to see the ones like Chomsky voice their opinions.

RayG

Nothing personal, but I think you've drawn your sword on a windmill here. I'm confident no objective observer (neither skeptic or believer) would look at his credentials and say he's not qualified to determine what is and isn't a language. I think you'd be better served to deconstruct his study and not his credentials. JMHO

Edited by rwridley

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Bonehead74

I'd be interested in seeing proof that holding a doctorate in linguistics automatically allows one to interpret an unknown language. History shows that we shouldn't discount the abilities of a gifted and passionate layperson. I'm not claiming that describes Scott Nelson, but credentialism doesn't automatically impart ability.

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