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slabdog

A Closer Look At The Sierra Sounds

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RayG

I think you'd be better served to deconstruct his study and not his credentials. JMHO

Very well, I'm not qualified to deconstruct his study, but I happen to know a PhD in Linguistics that might take a stab at it.

RayG

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Guest

Very well, I'm not qualified to deconstruct his study, but I happen to know a PhD in Linguistics that might take a stab at it.

RayG

Very cool.

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Guest bsruther

I'd be interested in seeing proof that holding a doctorate in linguistics automatically allows one to interpret an unknown language. History shows that we shouldn't discount the abilities of a gifted and passionate layperson. I'm not claiming that describes Scott Nelson, but credentialism doesn't automatically impart ability.

I can't offer proof, but I can tell you with certainty, through personal experience that having those three letters behind your name, doesn't make you an expert or a genius.

It's not like Scott Nelson's work is going to prove that Bigfoot exists or that the Sierra tapes are real. He has pointed out some things within these recordings, such as repeated words and voice inflections that make them much more compelling and fascinating, to me anyway. I don't yet consider them to be authentic, but I find them much less likely to be a hoax now, than before Scott Nelson analyzed them

.

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Guest

Yes, seriously. I've read his resume. He's a translator/interpreter. Have YOU ever worked as a crypto-linguist? I have. I've known a few in my day too, and none of them would ever claim they could translate an unknown language into English.

A crypto-linguist is trained to listen and interpret including interpreting different accents, vocal sounds & intonations. Trained to listen and pick out sounds; that will not make him an expert at translating an unknown language, but would make him highly qualified to pick out what sounds he could hear and say whether or not it is similar to a language he/she may be familiar with.

Who is trained to interpret unknown languages? Well since the study of linguistics is basically broken into four categories and the first is is the study of language structure, or grammar. This focuses on the system of rules followed by the speakers (or hearers) of a language. It encompasses morphology (the formation and composition of words), syntax (the formation and composition of phrases and sentences from these words), and phonology (sound systems). Phonetics is a related branch of linguistics concerned with the actual properties of speech sounds and nonspeech sounds, and how they are produced and perceived. (italicized section is copied from the linguistics wiki). Sounds like a crypto-linguist is somewhat qualified to give it a go.

As far as the Northern Cali Sasqui having an unknown language, by not having enough recorded samples, we can't even hazard a guess to what possible roots it has. The Sierra sounds at times almost sound Japanese, maybe there is some roots in either Japanese or the Japanese' root langauge Dravidian (Tamil). Maybe slowed down and cleaned up a bit, a crypto-linguist in a certain language could say, hey that sounds a bit like ancient _fill in the blank_.

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Guest

For a crypto-linguist, linguist, or semantics expert to be able to decipher "sasquatch language", that would imply that the language is "human", would it not?

The Sierra Sounds don't seem human to me, unless a human Bigfoot is having a little fun with his gullible cousins.

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Guest

Who's claiming they have translated the Sierra Sounds?

Scott repeatetly states he CAN'T translate them because there is no way to know what the Sasquatches are saying. He has broken the language down into phonemes and created a written language/method to document those phonemes.

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RayG

I stand corrected. I shouldn't have said or implied that Nelson is 'translating' an unknown language into English. No, what he's doing is connecting a language he's not familiar with to Sasquatches.

Had the Squatches been speaking Russian or Spanish, Nelson would be quite qualified to interpret.

RayG

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Guest

:D

Neat!

I've been a Morehead fan since "This is a knocker". I heard something that very resembled the same "crazy lady grumbling" while on the Trask, but no proof, so it never happened.

I did find out that there is such a creature as the mountain beaver after seeing what I thought was a very messed up freaky "WFT is that a rabbit? That can't be a rabbit, is it a Nutria? Hawks no, that's no Nutria" though.

It was so very odd a rabbit/not Nutria that I googled the description and location. I found a Pika that way too this summer.

:)

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gigantor

Scott repeatetly states he CAN'T translate them because there is no way to know what the Sasquatches are saying. He has broken the language down into phonemes and created a written language/method to document those phonemes.

The problem of translating an unknown language is very relevant to encryption. In essence, encryption is a language that only the intended recipient knows. This technique has been used for hundreds of years.

In WWII the U.S. used Native Americans as code talkers over the radio, the japanese were unable to decipher the language. Navajo and Cherokee I believe.

I wouldn't say it's impossible to decipher an unknown language, but nearly so unless you have some frame of reference. You need some known roots about the language, like the meaning of a bunch of key words along with context.

If you were to video (with clear sound) a couple of BF having a long conversation about a deer kill, in broad daylight , you might have something. The longer the conversation the better.

Documenting phonemes might be an important first step, if you believe the recordings are of a real BF, but they won't help you translate anything. I would be very skeptical of any such claims, glad Nelson isn't making them.

Edited by gigantor

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Guest Kerchak

I thought the Sierra Sounds had been baffling the experts since the 1970s, as long ago as when The Mysterious Monsters and Peter Graves took the sounds to a "Dr Robert Sheldon" in 1975 who performed a digital analysis of them on film. Sheldon mentioned the strange vowel construction of the 'words' and seemed to think the size needed to produce such sounds were well beyond a normal man.

Edited by Kerchak

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gigantor

I think the lowest form of evidence is sound. As interesting as some these recordings are, they don't prove anything.

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Guest

Very well, I'm not qualified to deconstruct his study, but I happen to know a PhD in Linguistics that might take a stab at it.

RayG

Maybe you should send him a copy of the recording, and see if he thinks there is anything to it.

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Guest

I can't offer proof, but I can tell you with certainty, through personal experience that having those three letters behind your name, doesn't make you an expert or a genius.

Yet when they follow names like Jeff Meldrum or John Bindernagel those letters become very important to a lot of people here.

This homespun "let's laugh at the college boy" thing is well and good for a laugh sometimes, but don't forget that your farmer down the road picked up a lot of information along the way that came from somebody's thesis at some point: soil conservation, pesticide and herbicide applications, livestock nutrition, crop rotations, market forecasts . . . Sure, if you gave the farmer and the PhD a hoe, a bag of seeds, and 10 acres, the guy who farms for a living is probably going to get more out of his 10 acres than the guy who spends most of his time in the greenhouse and in front of his computer. But the deck is stacked against the PhD, because the farmer's expertise includes the accumulated wisdom of dozens of PhDs who published the articles and informed the county Extension agents that have helped him, his daddy, and his daddy's daddy be successful farmers in the first place.

Sorry for the derail - I don't mind when folks disrespect someone who happens to have a PhD, but I'll never understand why some folks would disrespect someone because they have a PhD. Sentiments like that are one reason we'll soon be welcoming our Chinese overlords . . .

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gigantor

I stand on the shoulders of...

or something like that.

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