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2023 Urban Bigfoot, Seriously?


Lake County Bigfooot
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On 1/18/2023 at 1:44 PM, Huntster said:

 

It was tiny. I killed it, along with a couple of its siblings, packed my stuff, and started the long 6+ mile hike out. I stepped on it while barefoot, letting my boots dry after the hike in. It got me on the bottom of my foot. By the time I was out, my lower leg was nearly black and horribly swollen. I got anti-venom in Azuza, probably 6 hours after the bite. 

 

If I was your dog, I'd hate you for putting that collar on me!

 

Glad you made it out OK, Huntster. Nasty things, those.

 

Laughing at your collar comment, yeah, I can see that side of it. But to me, it seemed like a victory for us to get through that ordeal, and wanted her to have a trophy. 

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1 hour ago, NorthWind said:

......Nasty things, those........

 

I absolutely hate venomous snakes. Alaska has no snakes at all, and that's one of the primary reasons I love it here.

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I absolutely hate venomous snakes, and the fact of living with them would terrify me to an extent. I guess I am able to deal with it while down in Florida. Been listening to a lot of encounters on various 

outlets, and a few have been pretty enlightening. What I always find convincing is the predictable behaviors the creatures exhibit, like watching from afar, crouching into a small stump, swaying side

to side when seen, pacing hunters out of the woods, et. As I have mentioned in the past, I live just south of a State Park in Northern Illinois on the Fox River. In 2020, I got my third boat, a 16.5 foot 

Lund deep V walk thru, I spend a ton of time on the water. I have seen deer swim across the lake from the state park, as well as cross the channels and use the cattails as travel routes. This all funnels

down to a marsh area that is behind my house, behind that is an isolated corn and soybean farm. The deer travel through my marsh from the lakes to get to that farmers field. This is why we also have

a very healthy pack of coyotes who take advantage of the muskrats, rabbits, coons, and the occasional deer. This food chain I suppose is in place when Sasquatch are present, or could be present.

I have long thought they must have milk runs of sorts, various spots they routinely visit. I seemed like in 2013 they were leaving a juvenile here to learn how to hunt, and would gather him up somewhere

in the night and leave before the sun was up.

Edited by Lake County Bigfooot
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1 minute ago, hiflier said:

 

Yeah, and when they sneak into a village during a blizzard to dine, they're as sneaky as a viper coiled up and camouflaged and ready to envenomate you.

 

But they're above the Arctic Circle. I don't go up there much, and certainly not during winter...........

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5 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

I absolutely hate venomous snakes. Alaska has no snakes at all, and that's one of the primary reasons I love it here.

 

I had my first encounter with a Timber Rattler 5-6 years ago. In thin grass and invisible. Then, nearly three years ago, I had two encounters with a  TR within two weeks of each other. I was in the strike zone and both recoiled. Once again, those two were invisible and I could never have avoided them no matter how carefully I stepped. 

 

It has changed my approach to being in the woods. For many years I wore trail runners.  Now, I adorn heavy, thick-leather boots and snake gaiters. That, admittedly, has taken some fun out of things. Clodhoppers versus nimbly and quick. 

 

As far as an urban bigfoot goes, it wouldn't surprise me if one was passing through at night and could thread the needle by traveling in sparsely-wooded areas.

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8 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

I absolutely hate venomous snakes. Alaska has no snakes at all, and that's one of the primary reasons I love it here.

Not many in Oregon, and virtually none where we go. Most are in the Eastern side of the Cascades. Not a fan of them, either. But Florida was the worst of the places I've stomped around in.

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Last one seen in my neck of the woods was seen by some biology students I was touring around the woods.  It was coiled up near a springhead where it luckily was noticed by them well before being a danger.  Great ambush spot selectivity of that one.  I've seen some large yellow phase ones (beautiful) crossing the road successfully with the help of a shovel handle lift before a dumptruck rounded the bend. Another while doing some brush cutting with old style scythe high on a mtn gap trail with tall wildflowers/weeds, saw movement below me and missed it by about an inch with the scythe, but my day was cut short after that. So large I never saw the head or the rattles as it eased across the trail perpindicular to me. 

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There are no venomous snakes in the Lower Mainland/Fraser Valley area of BC, where I live and mostly explore, but there are rattlers in the Similkameen and Okanagon Valleys where I mostly hunt in the fall, and I occasionally run into them. They were very common there 60 years ago, when I spent my teen summers up there picking fruit and chasing girls. My buddies and I often caught them in the orchards and sold them for $2 each to a little tourist trap zoo, called the Grey Sage Natural History Museum. My last encounter was about 15 years ago, on a gopher shoot in the hills above the village of Hedley, traversing a hillside on a cattle track. My 2 buddies were on another cattle track, maybe 30' higher upslope from me, and heard the rattle at the same time I did; they say they've never seen anyone move in reverse as fast as I did! It was coiled up in the middle of the track, and I had been about to step on it when it rattled. We should have clued in to the possibility of meeting snakes, as we had driven to that spot on Buzztail Road, LOL.

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Buzztail Road, I love that name. Whoever walks up the road ought to think, “hmmm, what could that mean?” But it’ll pass right over their heads until…”Damn, why didn’t they name it Rattlesnake Way?!”

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On 1/13/2023 at 5:09 AM, guyzonthropus said:

I'm fairly certain they're around in the San Gabriel mountains in the north side of Los Angeles. Theres a number of reports of them in the lower canyons at the edge of towns, even on the northern edge of Pasadena where this one old estate serves as access to a couple trails. The oak scrub gets pretty dense right off and there's plenty of deer. There's little reason to think they wouldn't be there.

 

I had come across something about Bigfoot in the San Gabriels a few months ago and as you mention, there were some reports of them. As I remember from what I read, it seemed most of the reports were dated in the 70's, and maybe early 80's.

 

This pic is said to be a replica of a cast made from a track found in the San Gabriel Mtns. in 1974.

It's certainly odd looking with it's three toes and curved shape.

 

161394408_losangelthrede.thumb.jpg.2b47ff00fb135fa9f288a72c9ebe9728.jpg

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