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Seasonal migration?


TGB
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Interested in everyones thoughts regarding migration habits of these creatures.

I am in Ohio so specifically hoping for ohio input.

Has there been work done in this area?

All input wanted regardless very curious if the geographic location matters.

Is it related to prey/game migration?

Is it weather related?

Habitat incroachment?

What would a territory range size be?

Or are they nomadic? 

Are we talking family units, individuals or tribes?

Are these individuals being seen near the suburbs similar to black bear males out looking for mates and territory of their own? 

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I believe they are in family units, which includes individual disbursal after puberty.

 

Movements would be seasonal in montane environments, following snow levels. This coincides with food availability. There may be meat caching, which helps account for the stench often (but not always) reported. No adic movements is also likely due to human intrusion or food pressures. Territory size might seem huge, but I think that has mire to do with their extremely limited population.

 

They are seen in suburban environments on occasions, but they disappear from said locales just as suddenly as they appear, strongly indicating the dispersal and nomadic wandering of an individual searching for a mate and/or home range.

 

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A very good summary, Huntster. After reading many, many sighting reports, this fits with what I’ve read. 
I would like to see others’ comments about these observations, like how long reports came in of sightings in any certain urban community.

Also, isn’t it possible to research this topic thru use of the SSR database?

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Here is a fairly lengthy discussion regarding migration and excellent analysis by BobbyO, Gigantor, BigTreeWalker, Norse, and others:

 

https://bigfootforums.com/topic/2034-migration/page/3/

 

I believe there is a movement that "follows" both the food source and ease of ability to access it. Could mean they move to lower altitudes or areas where there are less, or no, snow?  Does the movement involve going all the way from snow-capped peaks to temperate climates? I'd guess yes to the former and probably not to the latter.

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Getting animals to alter their archetypal migration routes include micro-regional factors that one cannot ignore in these kinds of discussions. In response, USFW and state F&W agencies, along with US and state highway commissions, have been working on migration issues for decades to reduce Human and animal fatalities as well as making efforts at reconnecting green corridors. This file is just one example of a nationwide, if not worldwide, effort to correct the problem- which is of our own making. BUT!!!

 

It also begs the question: Where are all the Sasquatch photos?:

 

Vermont Culvert Migration Program.pdf

 

Edited by hiflier
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9 hours ago, Wolfjewel said:

.........Also, isn’t it possible to research this topic thru use of the SSR database?

 

It sure is. The SSR us an excellent research tool. Lors of patterns and trends can be seen.

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16 hours ago, TGB said:

Interested in everyones thoughts regarding migration habits of these creatures.

I am in Ohio so specifically hoping for ohio input.

Has there been work done in this area?

All input wanted regardless very curious if the geographic location matters.

Is it related to prey/game migration?

Is it weather related?

Habitat incroachment?

What would a territory range size be?

Or are they nomadic? 

Are we talking family units, individuals or tribes?

Are these individuals being seen near the suburbs similar to black bear males out looking for mates and territory of their own? 

 

A lot of investigation goes on in Ohio. Start with the BFRO, some of their research folks have written books, podcasts, etc. There are many independent, as well. Good example of such here: http://www.bfro.net/avevid/SOUNDS/cvnp_ohio_howls.asp

 

Geography is everything.

It seems more accurate to say they are nomadic, following game and seasonal foods.

They seem to be adapted to all climates, although local weather could temporarily affect their movements.

Territory size dependent on geography, can be quite large.

I think generally they're in family groups, from small to large. Sightings of individuals are no indication of their group size or presence. They're usually relatively near other group members with whom they can audibly communicate.

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, JKH said:

A lot of investigation goes on in Ohio. Start with the BFRO, some of their research folks have written books, podcasts, etc. There are many independent, as well. Good example of such here: http://www.bfro.net/avevid/SOUNDS/cvnp_ohio_howls.asp

 

I see similar advice fairly often given. And one's intentions are always good when posting suggestions like this. Anyone looking at these suggested websites or podcasts any personal investigation done by members by following these sources will soon find that their own investigations will, more often than not, only progress as far as the very sources they are clicking on. And nearly ALL of those sources, as far as I can tell, are endemic in that they all hit a wall, i.e. dead end, and so anyone looking for true answers will only end up hitting that very same wall. And get stopped cold.

 

We should be looking at ways to either go over the wall or bust through it, otherwise progress toward truth and discovery will keep everyone snared in an endless loop relying on "experts" to do the heavy lifting. So far that has resulted in zero where something as relatively simple as proof of existence seems to take a left turn. The obvious pattern here is to stop short. So I ask you, is there really and truly a good reason for that kind of pattern of always stopping short to even still exist in this community? There IS an answer to that question: Yes, because we put up with it, and in most cases even support the people responsible for that pattern.

 

Edited by hiflier
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Well, the poster asked a few specific questions which I tried to answer without offering further personal opinions about the big picture. Investigations have to start somewhere, and will progress as far and as broadly as the individual determines, relying on experts or not.

 

Since I know they exist, the idea of proof of existence is uninteresting to me and probably others. Can't speak for the OP, but maybe this thread, like so many others, isn't the place to start arguing for it.

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I DID say "one's intentions are always good." And yours were and are. Thanks for the slap anyway, much appreciated.

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21 hours ago, TGB said:

Interested in everyones thoughts regarding migration habits of these creatures.

I am in Ohio so specifically hoping for ohio input.

Has there been work done in this area?

All input wanted regardless very curious if the geographic location matters.

Is it related to prey/game migration?

Is it weather related?

Habitat incroachment?

What would a territory range size be?

Or are they nomadic? 

Are we talking family units, individuals or tribes?

Are these individuals being seen near the suburbs similar to black bear males out looking for mates and territory of their own? 

 

I would strongly encourage you to access the SSR database. Admittedly, it takes a little while to understand how to enter search criteria but when you do you can customize your search. For example, I wanted to see what time of day/night produced the most sightings in my research region. That has been very helpful and what I've seen or heard over the years has fallen coincidentally occurred within those results.

 

In your case, you might try searching sightings in your area at various altitude levels to see if there are differences by season to see if can develop a pattern.

 

To be successful, a professional bass fisherman/woman must quickly drill down on criteria for that particular day and conditions. Termerature change, atmospheric pressure, water levels changes, color, season, time of day, shadows, and a thousand more.  It may not be much different with sasquatches. Certain conditions could have them behaving a certain way.

 

Good luck with the SSR and don't hesitate to ask us questions. We're happy to help.

Edited by wiiawiwb
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Summed up best by the movie Jaws:

 

 

 

 

Brody: Is it true that most people get attacked by sharks in three feet of water about ten feet from the beach? 

Hooper: Yeah. 

Brody: And that... and that before people started to swim for recreation - I mean before sharks knew what they were missing - that a lot of these attacks weren't reported? 

Hooper: That's right. 

Brody: Now this shark that... that... that swims alone... 

Hooper: Rogue. 

Brody: What's it called? 

HooperBrody: [together] Rogue. 

Brody: Rogue, yeah. Now this guy, he... he keeps swimmin' around in a place where the feeding is good until the food supply is gone, right? 

Hooper: It's called "territoriality". It's just a theory that I happen to... agree with. 

 

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SSR Team
21 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

It sure is. The SSR us an excellent research tool. Lors of patterns and trends can be seen.

Using the SSR database, you could plot points by season on a map and see where the points fall. Color the different seasons so you can see the visual pattern. You could even add layers like urban centers, roads, etc. and see if a more defined pattern exists!

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Or tap into the websites that actually DO animal migration monitoring: https://www.google.com/search?sa=X&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=Animal+Tracker+map&client=firefox-b-1-d&ved=2ahUKEwja7byN6YDyAhVkGVkFHeCGA-4QjJkEegQIGxAC&biw=1366&bih=643

 

The problem is that we ALL know animals migrate. What we don't research is what those migration patterns look like. If folks think Sasquatches follow these animal migrations then wouldn't it be more productive to go to the sources that actually study and graph out those migrations? Overlay THOSE patterns and then one has something solid to work with if they want to see if reports line up with already established migration pattern knowledge that one can access and easily visualize.

 

Edited by hiflier
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SSR Team
3 hours ago, hiflier said:

Or tap into the websites that actually DO animal migration monitoring: https://www.google.com/search?sa=X&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=Animal+Tracker+map&client=firefox-b-1-d&ved=2ahUKEwja7byN6YDyAhVkGVkFHeCGA-4QjJkEegQIGxAC&biw=1366&bih=643

 

The problem is that we ALL know animals migrate. What we don't research is what those migration patterns look like. If folks think Sasquatches follow these animal migrations then wouldn't it be more productive to go to the sources that actually study and graph out those migrations? Overlay THOSE patterns and then one has something solid to work with if they want to see if reports line up with already established migration pattern knowledge that one can access and easily visualize.

 

USGS offers a migration route dataset now. They have a few species and a few populations they monitored.

 

https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/61fd7f6ed34e622189cf3fb9

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