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Seasonal migration?


TGB
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Still bugs me if they migrate and follow game and there's fresh snow fall in half of the U.S  and a few thousand of them why aren't tracks found

after a fresh snow fall ?  Many places the woods are filled with hunters , snow machine riders , cross country skiers etc 

 

New England states after a snow fall you can walk the woods and find almost every track of every animal that inhabit the woods .

 

 

 

 

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And one doesn't even have to walk the woods to do that. I've spotted animal tracks galore jut about everywhere both this past Sat/Sun as well as today. May go out again tomorrow but definitely in a couple of days as more snow is expected by Thursday. Should be able to cover quit a bit of territory before next week looking for road approaches and/or crossings in the more rural and wooded areas. My method is to circle around areas using roads of any type in order to section off search quadrants. Animals of all sizes and types move around a lot as is evidenced by trackways that cut across the roads I've been driving- with a dash cam.

 

It's not uncommon to see deer and 'yotes using the same routes. Humans, too with snow sleds, skis, snow shoes etc., but not nearly as much as one might think. Miles of habitat with only animal tracks and I especially carefully check pinch points like bridges over brooks and creeks. Two or three hours a day is all that's needed in order to cover a lot of ground as I circle around habitats like ponds, bogs, and fields as well as denser woods. Don't even care if I see a Sasquatch or not. It's only all about finding its prints. And I'm patient.

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If I remember right you live in Maine so if there are Sasquatches that live in this part of the country Maine would seem 

a good place for them to live . Even with the rough winters there is plenty of whitetail they could harvest for food and plenty of forest to hide

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Indeed. My travels over these past three years, though not as often as this year is shaping up to be is showing me that there is food aplenty in these winter habitats. And also flowing water with tracks of all kinds at their edges. Going on Meldrum's estimations of bear populations vs. Sasquatch it would follow that the Maine population (if there even is one) might be somewhere between 300-400 individuals in Maine's 31,000 or so square miles. So what are my chances? This, along with various other factors is why I've chosen this method of research. Plus the potential scientific possibility of collecting DNA from a definitive trackway should I come across one. All in all, for me, at this stage in life and knowledge anyway, this style of winter research has a lot going for it.

 

Edited by hiflier
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Our own @BobbyO did a wonderful graphical research project on Elk migrations through the Colorado Springs areas to other national forests

in Colorado and he may have correlated it with BF sightings if I am not mistaken.  I know he shared some graphics with me at one point, not

sure if he still has those data or not?  What you say @BobbyO ?

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Nice to know my brain isn't failing me, didn't have a chance to read the whole thread! :crazy:

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On 1/26/2023 at 3:40 AM, bipedalist said:

Our own @BobbyO did a wonderful graphical research project on Elk migrations through the Colorado Springs areas to other national forests

in Colorado and he may have correlated it with BF sightings if I am not mistaken.  I know he shared some graphics with me at one point, not

sure if he still has those data or not?  What you say @BobbyO ?

 

10+ years now that B, if not pushing 15.

 

I'd have to really dig it out i guess at some stage but i'll try..

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On 1/23/2023 at 1:23 AM, TGB said:

Interested in everyones thoughts regarding migration habits of these creatures.

I am in Ohio so specifically hoping for ohio input.

Has there been work done in this area?

All input wanted regardless very curious if the geographic location matters.

Is it related to prey/game migration?

Is it weather related?

Habitat incroachment?

What would a territory range size be?

Or are they nomadic? 

Are we talking family units, individuals or tribes?

Are these individuals being seen near the suburbs similar to black bear males out looking for mates and territory of their own? 

 

I found some pretty interesting data on the Ozarks in MO with some real interesting spring > summer numbers if my memory serves me right.

 

It's real late here right now so i'll dig it out and post (my) tomorrow.

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On 1/24/2023 at 5:36 PM, 7.62 said:

Still bugs me if they migrate and follow game and there's fresh snow fall in half of the U.S  and a few thousand of them why aren't tracks found

after a fresh snow fall ?  Many places the woods are filled with hunters , snow machine riders , cross country skiers etc 

 

New England states after a snow fall you can walk the woods and find almost every track of every animal that inhabit the woods .

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an important point!  It is clear, and logical.   If someone ran through a murder scene where blood was all over the floor, the person who ran through should have traces. They should be expected to have blood on their shoes, splatter up onto their cloths and so on.  The room would have their same size shoe leaving footprints on the bloody floor.   

 

It would be no different with Bigfoot.  

 

If there is snow in all these places, then nearly every animal in the Boy Scout manual will leave traces.  These might include Deer, Rabbits, Fox, and so on.  Yet they might be seen, and they may not be seen.   Wolverines and other less common animals might leave traces but being rare, might rarely ever be seen.  

 

If we assume Bigfoot exists, then it is logical they either 1) do not exist in these places cold enough for snow or 2) migrate out of those places once winter arrives.

 

I realize at times Bigfoot tracks are seen in the snow.  They might be real or not.  But they should be seen all the time in the same amount or greater in these snowy areas.  If seems to me, they are not.  This tells me the Pacific Northwest with its unique climate, conditions, and sightings history continues to be more reasonable Bigfoot Country.

 

Wherever tracks are left - bit it snows or dirt- the stride length continues to be a limiting factor on a hoaxer's ability to maintain a hoax.

 

I have walked in the woods like anyone else and you would think with all the hikers out there walking in the woods there would be more hiker footprints out there.  When I was in Colorado during the summer of 2020, I did not see any "people" footprints esp. noticeable in the Rocky Mountain National Park area of Estes Park.  Yet, there were so many people in the area, we needed to have a reserve time to enter the park.  Granted it wasn't raining but still you would think there would be lots of footprints.  

 

Finally, I'll admit if I was there in winter/ snow, I would expect one could see 100s of tracks of these hikers and visitors.

 

 

 

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I have a friend who has argued in favor of a hibernation hypothesis. Maybe, since we are in chronic speculation mode, we should look a bit closer at that concept. This creature is different in nearly every respect when it comes to pigeon-holing it into the Ape or Human camp. That is to say, what would be so bad about adding on one more out-of-the-normal-primate characteristic? Hibernation. Could answer more than one question about winter survival in brutal temperatures and snow conditions, food supply, lack of tracks in snow, or only rare tracks in snow, and a bunch of other problems concerning the current (and past) winter discussions.

 

Hibernation. with an occasional rousing for whatever reason. So. Why not hibernation? Just because it's likened to a primate doesn't rule it out. It would just be one more odd thing about the Sasquatch should it exist. I mean, it's broken so many "rules" already, right? So why not that rule as well.

 

It's on the table.....

 

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38 minutes ago, hiflier said:

I have a friend who has argued in favor of a hibernation hypothesis. Maybe, since we are in chronic speculation mode, we should look a bit closer at that concept. This creature is different in nearly every respect when it comes to pigeon-holing it into the Ape or Human camp. That is to say, what would be so bad about adding on one more out-of-the-normal-primate characteristic? Hibernation. Could answer more than one question about winter survival in brutal temperatures and snow conditions, food supply, lack of tracks in snow, or only rare tracks in snow, and a bunch of other problems concerning the current (and past) winter discussions.

 

Hibernation. with an occasional rousing for whatever reason. So. Why not hibernation? Just because it's likened to a primate doesn't rule it out. It would just be one more odd thing about the Sasquatch should it exist. I mean, it's broken so many "rules" already, right? So why not that rule as well.

 

It's on the table.....

 

You know another thing that really bugs me is the paid expeditions that BFRO does and claims many have encounters that have rock throwing, knocking or they hear them close by . If they want to be so sure they are Really having encounters have them in the snow not during the summer months . Listen we hear knocking from the guide !  that's a Bigfoot we are sure ! or just had a rock or stick thrown !  Yup Bigfoot !  

 

Well do it during the months the people can walk in the area and show the tracks in the snow where these guides say it was a Bigfoot . 

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Another thing was the show finding Bigfoot . I would venture to guess 99% they never ventured out in the snow looking . Always in warmer months .

They claimed many times watching the show they heard something that was Bigfoot , Well if there was snow you could walk and find tracks of what you say was a Bigfoot.

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Careful there, 7.62, you're starting to sound almost as frustrated as I am in trying to make sense out of what other people do. And those very people have the gall to keep charging money for little to nothing in return. Or whatever passes for a return is returned to a bar set so low by attendees and novices that I could throw a rock unseen into the brush and freak everyone out: "It's BIGFOOT!" That's how low the bar is set on Finding Bigfoot as well- if not lower. It's a real shame. Shame on them!

 

But yeah, Bigfoot activity without the foliage screen but in winter with good visibility and the possibility of snow tracks? It's a win/win. Oh, and then there would be DNA possibilities- which never gets brought up on Finding Bigfoot, though I've yet to view even a single episode myself in all these years so that may or may not be true since Ms. Hollander is the scientist on the team.

 

P.S. It's why I do my research in winter....nothing so far to report. Animal tracks galore everywhere, though. So....about that hibernation thing....

 

 

Edited by hiflier
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I agree with snowy weather expeditions as making intuitive sense, problem is many gated roads in the Pacific NW and poor access and more liability for hypothermia, exposure if things head south with a paying crowd.  I do not believe in a hibernation theory, I was chased out of an area by an aggressive tree push over, tree snap or something that is good at imitating earthquake and treefall noises.  That while trying to access a pinchpoint with snow on the ground in an area with known action that I thought might produce prints after a nightly light snow.  Taught me a big lesson if you are accessing steep terrain, have a team approach the pinchpoint from two differing directions or push through the fear and stick to your plan.  In my case I was descending a ridge and the ambush was not going to happen the way I had figured and they had me figured out somehow and turned the tables on me.  Taught me a big lesson and caused a long detour for me that day.  The only thing I succeeded in capturing in the way of prints in the snow that year was black bear.  Not even the black bear truly hibernate in my neck of the woods (southern appalachians) they just go through periods of cyclical torpor and forage under oak trees in the snow at times (when we have snow on my side of the mtns). 

 

@BobbyO anything of substance from the archives would be cool!

Edited by bipedalist
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