hiflier

Where Are The Dead Sasquatch?

153 posts in this topic

Even if the tribe showed up and removed their fallen member there might only be a couple of places they would take them? And I could not agree more on the calamity victim. If Sasquatch is out there then even in small numbers I doubt they would go through life without a scratch. And it bears repeating that for the current time we live in then only going through reports spanning back about thirty five years may be all that has to happen. No further back than 1980 . That would even put a ten year old Sasquatch at that time up to around 45 years old. Parents? Easily 50 plus.

 

There are around 550 reports in Mr. Green's database for the time span between 1985-1995. It's a data set that is more than manageable. Increase that timeframe by taking the data back 5 more years to 1980 and the data set nearly doubles to around 1,000 reports. Still more than manageable as it cuts the database down to only 25% of the total

Edited by hiflier
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I just thought of another source of a body that might have been forgotten by the BF themselves.    There are old accounts of BF being shot in the distant past and buried by the humans involved.     Perhaps we need to research old accounts, and newspapers,  and try to figure out the burial location.   Davy Crockett supposedly shot a BF.   Someone Teddy Roosevelt knew was reported to have shot a BF.    They might have been reported in newspapers at the time and called wild men,   mountain devils,   or apes.    Like the ET that was killed in the crash in Texas in the 1890s,   he was buried in a cemetery in the area and the event was reported by local papers.       When UFO researchers interviewed people in the area, they managed to locate  the grave.     They applied to disinter the body, but while waiting for county approval,  in the night some agency with a back hoe had dug up the grave.    Most likely the Feds.     So hopefully any such a BF burial is not in a cemetery and requires approval to dig   

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I'm very familiar with the Texas UFO story. Took out a wter tower on the way down I think. Anyway the shooting thing is a good thought. I know there's an old report from the 1880's or so here in Maine about three Canadian hunters that lost one of their hunting party to a "Wildman" They rounded up a bunch of locals and went out and killed it somewhere "in the dense forest above Moosehead Lake". That's mostly all timber company land.

 

Question for you and everyone: What kind of data would best suit a limited timeframe database for the purposes of determining an old age death scenario. Other than the date LOL.

Edited by hiflier
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H, what do you want ?

 

A heat map from a set period from a specific state ?

 

With an overlap layer maybe of further decades for example ?

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Well, I was kind of asking what others wanted BobbyO. For myself though? Hard data. Smaller more pinpointed areas than maybe a heat map. I think Counties, towns, distances, directions, a fairly narrow time frame. some specifics regarding terrain features, bodies of water, rivers etc., elevation, and perhaps a half dozen other criteria to round out the encounters like trackways perhaps, size as a ballpark way to determine maturity.

 

The idea as you know is to create an "old age" database for specific locations based on the territorial aspects of the creature. For grey and white haired creatures the dataset may be even more critical perhaps even more recent in its timeframe if color and age somewhat coincide?. Example: a grey one in 1998 may have once been a dark brown one in 1982. Of course there's no way to know that but with regard to the data set color may be very important so color should be a criteria in the data also. 

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A couple of quick, random, and wholly undocumented thoughts (which also have probably been pointed out numerous times)...

 

We had a deer carcass in the woods behind our house - nice 6-point that must have gotten hit by a car, then not so quietly croaked or was finished off there.  This was about two Thursdays ago.  In one week, it was picked down to the bones.  Right now, it's a pretty big rib cage, but not much else to see and if you didn't know it was there, you'd probably walk right past it.  Just imagine the difficulty of finding a body in more remote, more difficult terrain.

 

And to help with that imagination - based on a few threads here, I joined our local S&R team, which just did a drill to find a missing hiker this past weekend.  "Rescue Randy" (or Rhonda, he/she is pretty gender neutral) would stand out like a sore thumb in the woods - until you shift him just over the edge of a small rockpile and near some trees.  This was very difficult to do in a small area w/the other "lost hiker" giving some gentle clues so we didn't spend the whole day out there.  

 

Last, there is the problem of finding the Bigfoot needle in the home range haystack.  My 53-page opus from now 2 years ago is in the Vermont sightings thread should anyone care to download it.  But looking at the home range of some encounters which could have been made by a single/small group of bigfoot, you get

 

Ole Slippery Skin - 900 square miles over at least 8 years.

 A generic bigfoot seen near Whitehall - 35 square miles over 3 years

 

So if you absolutely knew that a Bigfoot died in its home area, there's still a lot of ground to cover to find a body.  I agree with SWWASAS - the best hope is a fresh kill after a natural calamity.   I mean, if a bigfoot dies in the mountains and gets covered by drifted snow (to preserve the body), how long can it stay hidden?

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Hi Trog, agreed. In certain conditions bones can be gone in months. In other conditions bones can last decades. The move here is to set up a recent timeframe for death from old age that may have occurred closer to our current time give or take a few months or a couple of years on the outside. We don't really know how long the creature's lifespan is and like us different factors will vary that lifespan. There have been discussions on seasonal gestation periods such as born in Spring etc. but other than those kinds of discussions infants may be born every year in different places so there's no generational patterns to follow.

 

The idea of old Sasquatch succumbing to the elements, disease, or injuries make generalizations necessary. A territorial nature can be upset by outside influences like development, fires, droughts, floods and all kinds of things but since databases do not have those forcings we have little to go on but the report locales coupled to the report timeframe. The report I posted in the OP was because we have a member who does go to Snow Peak in Washington. I thought perhaps the report might be a good directional aid along with the grassy area with a pond. It isn't too specific but it's more specific than say, somewhere in the South Cascades or some such thing. The SSR can better pinpoint things and also give some timeframes that would be beneficial for reasoning out a creature that lived to be a certain age?

 

What you said about how hard it is to find such things is absolutely true and your S&R example was a good one. But if your Randy/Rhonda Rescue subject was thought to belong to a group that buried it own fallen then it could narrow the choices down some. That's what I'm hoping to do which is why working with a topo map and being cognizant of a caving system or a quarry was mentioned. Cliffs with rockfalls or a talus field were also brought up. This kind of research does require one to think rather deeply about how to research an area not for just a chance sighting but for remains as well.  

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I think it's half dozen of one, six of the other.

 

Its a different approach in the search for BF using available data points.  Nothing wrong with kicking the idea around.  But are you trading one haystack for another to look for that needle? IMO, yes.

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The questions you're asking don't matter, you've gone off on an irrelevant tangent.   Like I said before, if they were falling over dead and being left where they fell we'd have found bodies long ago.   We haven't so they don't.   That means questions of age, etc do not provide useful information if the purpose is to locate a dead one.   Why is this so hard for you?

 

MIB

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LOL,Twist, probably but any angle on this is worth a try. At least it feels like I'm doing something and being proactive and as long as I've got this database sitting and doing nothing I thought why not find ways to put it to some use. It was something Mr. Green wanted to have happen which is why he went to the trouble to give it to the public in the first place. It might take a couple of days or a week or so to populate the subset for the ten year timeframe that I think might work best for this old age idea. The point actually works on a couple of fronts. One is about the old aged Sasquatch dying and the other is to show that ideas like this can benefit from being set up with data.

 

And on the third front, even though the database was set up to be cross-referenced which I think makes it perhaps the only database that can offer that? I have been revising it off and on for a little over three years to make it the best it can possibly be. I estimate I have only about ten hours left to go to finish the work I started back in late summer of 2013.

 

9 minutes ago, MIB said:

The questions you're asking don't matter, you've gone off on an irrelevant tangent.   Like I said before, if they were falling over dead and being left where they fell we'd have found bodies long ago.   We haven't so they don't.   That means questions of age, etc do not provide useful information if the purpose is to locate a dead one.   Why is this so hard for you?

 

MIB

 

Heh, kinda had a feeling this was coming....what took you so long?

Edited by hiflier
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Heh, kinda had a feeling this was coming....what took you so long?

 

Trying to be polite. 

 

Are you just ignoring what I said because it doesn't fit your agenda?   Or are you holding out?  Do you actually have something new, creative, insightful, or intelligent that you're hiding as a surprise for later?   Which is it?   Here's your straight line if that's what you need.  Now would be a good "later" if you have something insightful to share. 

 

MIB

 

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I will have something to share MIB bit as I said I should've done my homework ahead of time with the database. What would be good is if there is some input regarding what folks would like to have out of a database that is set up for this reason. And of course as SWWAS said the environmental conditions would be a fact in whether or not this abbreviated database I'm putting together will work for anyone. It's only an idea. But I don't know how targeted someone may want this to be. I can trot out a database with over 500 entries for all over the the U'S and perhaps western Canada or I can target individual counties. It depends on what one is looking for.

 

Overall the point is that it will be age related for use in our present time even though the reports will be of a nature that would place a Sasquatch sighting into a current old age animal type of bracket. This isn't about a dead Sasquatch from 30 years ago understand. This is about a live Sasquatch from thirty years ago that if it lived what we think is a full life will have died maybe this year or in the last few months or if not then maybe this winter. So it has to be looked at as dead somewhat in the present. It may not matter in highly wet/acid soils but not everywhere has those conditions. Your own area definitely has it's issues when it comes to preserving bones. But if burial is in the cards then depending on the method of burial soils may not be as much of a factor.

 

As I mentioned before, we have a member here that went to Snow Peak on field research. The report in the OP mentioned the type of terrain/environment and that there was a pod. It also mentioned the distance and direction from town. All of those factors together might help to nail down a location that fits those descriptions. Snow Peak is an area that would be difficult to search. The witness was a bowhunter so may not have gone in too far off a road where there's a large grassy area with a pond about the same distance and direction from the closest town. And even though this methodology wouldn't be perfect I can see the picture and set up from the witness account.. Things change yes, but distance, direction, access, and ponds my get someone closer than blindly going in with nothing to go on. I think there's some value in that and this database can offer those kinds of details when the reports include them. It certainly can't hurt. one of the parents of that infant Sasquatch may be keeling over right now at 40+ years of age for all we know. How can this kind of database information not matter? It may not bear fruit but not because the data doesn't matter. For now that will have to do for insights until I either get someone who wants something specific or for everyone who will have to work the 500 entry database to each of their own locales. I apologize for my snarkiness too. Hate when I respond like that.

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10 hours ago, MIB said:

 

Trying to be polite. 

 

Are you just ignoring what I said because it doesn't fit your agenda?   Or are you holding out?  Do you actually have something new, creative, insightful, or intelligent that you're hiding as a surprise for later?   Which is it?   Here's your straight line if that's what you need.  Now would be a good "later" if you have something insightful to share. 

 

MIB

 

 

He could just be choosing to not bite on your bait.  

 

You have a different opinion than him regarding methods of research.  He has made his own topic to discuss his ideas.  You coming in here and disagreeing with him does not obligate him to address your concerns or criticisms.  Why rain on his parade if he wants to explore a different avenue?

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If we are looking for a dead one we might as well stop now! One would have been found by now as we are speaking about it and it has not happen yet. I say yet since there is that remote chance that some one might get lucky and find one. But I doubt this. The only solution to this problem I to go out and actually hunt one down and kill it. I have always been against this idea of actually hunting one own and killing one. But have never said that it was not possible to do so. One can track one and might even be able to out smart, out wit and even get close enough to get a shot at one since many have done so through out the years. But because of fear of repercussions these people decide best to hide what they did and forget what they did, but they were able to make it back alive.

 

So what is it that stops those that are actively hunting them? If we have the info on when they are around in areas on certain times of the year. Then that makes them predictable and we have the advantage of actually going out and taking one for our liking. If we have a database full of knowledge of what these creatures are doing at certain times of the year then we should be able to understand on how to hunt them and procure a specimen.

 

The one thing that has been told to me over and over when I speak of actually shooting one is that I be ripped apart. Oh what fear LoL. Maybe the fear is on the other side by them. Maybe it is that they actually fear us of our capabilities. We go into the woods with thermo's, nightvision and all our high tech devices in trying to capture proof of them. If we carry guns in the open ,they seem to stay clear of us. If we conceal our guns they still seem to stay clear of us . If we sit in a stand and we see them and we see the strength and the height that they have, just by their mere sighting we tend to fear. It is only when we stop fearing them when they tend to stay clear of us.

 

This is why I have started only looking for an aggressive ones who have learned to challenge us. These are the ones that we should be going after and getting a shot at one. I see mating as an avenue to an opening at finding one , a solo one that could be perfect. I see their aggression as a form of frustration of not being able to find a mate. I find this as a weakness on there part, plus I really do not see to much people talking about to much. Just like Bucks during the rut with their noses to the ground looking for does, they do not care what is around them. I feel that these creatures might have the same like every other creature on earth does with urges  to mate. if we can catch them in this stage then we can get ourselves a specimen. I am going hunting. It is gun season in Michigan if one crosses my path I am not sure what I will do until I am at that moment. But then no one will know until the study is over and even then no one will know if I did the deed. Dirty deeds done dirt cheap. Huh :) 

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Hi Hiflier,

 

Do you mean Snow Peak in Linn County, Oregon?

 

I've worked in old & new rock quarries on the north side of Snow Peak off Camp Morrison Rd & Thomas Creek. On Tom Rock and Monument Peak to the NE. And up Hammond Mainline (just outside of Lacomb about 10 miles NE of Lebanon) to the south of Snow Peak. We never came across any bones in any of the rock quarries we worked at around Snow Peak. But we did hear a single loud moan/howl (bigfoot?)    during our pre-dawn meeting above Bald Peter Creek south of Snow Peak in August 2003.

 

The area around Snow Peak has many gates, especially on the south side. So to look around up there wouldn't be easy unless you have a key or know the combination to the lock. Which I know, unless Weyerhaeuser changed it again.

 

Around Indian Prairie Lake or talus slopes might be places to look around Snow Peak. Also to the east in the Quartzville area there are a lot of mineshafts. But as for old rock quarries so far no bones have been found from my personal experience working in them for years.  

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