FarArcher

Do You Have a BF "Honey Hole?"

94 posts in this topic

On 3/24/2017 at 5:21 PM, SWWASAS said:

Would be tough for BF to sustain on acorns in the PNW     There are not a whole lot of oak trees West of the Cascades there to produce them.    There is a smidgen of evidence that BF may have some weaving skills.     Most seen in the form of art but certainly that could carry over to baskets which could be used to store food.       Not many claim to have been in a BF den or cave that lived to tell about it.   Who knows what might be stashed in them?     On the other hand there are steelhead and salmon runs that produce fish protein several times a year in many rivers.    Deer move around but are always present in the region.      Rodents are available year round.    Berries are present from early summer to late fall.   Perhaps they could be gathered and allowed to dry.   Native Americans had numerous root food sources which I suppose BF could collect also.       There are some reports of seen BF pulling roots.     Most of the Native American knowledge of these food sources has been list to modern civilization.    Perhaps by reading old settlers journals we could get an idea of what used to be food sources for humans in the area.   Certainly I doubt modern Native Americans have any special knowledge of that.     Most are even loosing their own languages.      Human history is pretty much what is left of tremendous amounts of lost knowledge.    Humans are terrible at keeping history.      When we conquer a rival we destroy their histories. 

 

Pine is edible. One thing we have a lot of on this continent is pine. So if you're out in the middle of nowhere and starving, if there is a pine tree you can eat. Spruces no, so you best learn the difference.

 

I took a photo of a bit of scat in British Columbia last year in the Flathead Wilderness. It looked human but was about 10" in length and easily 3" in diameter. Right in the road (which is closed to motorized traffic), a few miles north of the US border, about 49.067051, -114.862906. A minute or two earlier I had stopped to take a photo of an unusual stick formation in the forest adjacent to the road. As I was taking the photo of that, I heard a 'whoop! from way up on the mountainside above me. The photo of the stick formation turned out to be out of focus but the other shot was OK.

 

 

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1 hour ago, salubrious said:

Pine is edible

I think what most animals would find edible are the seeds in the cones which are a major food source for many animals.

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Getting back on topic, I would take segments of territory that are bisected by rivers and streams and search or surveille within a mile of those on either side to find honey holes. 

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19 hours ago, Cryptic Megafauna said:

I think what most animals would find edible are the seeds in the cones which are a major food source for many animals.

 The base of the pine needle is edible and the younger growth is edible too.

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