• Announcements

    • masterbarber

      T shirt fund drive   07/17/2018

      norseman has designed a t shirt and started a fund drive on custom ink. He is going to split the proceeds between the BFF and Project Grendel.  "We all owe this website a tremendous debt of gratitude. Our community and history would not exist without it. As far as the Project Grendel proceeds, I would like to see it go towards the purchase of a thermal scope."
      -norseman     https://www.customink.com/fundraising/sasquatch-hunter
Branco

Bigfoot Harvesting Fruits, Berries & Vegetables.

143 posts in this topic

It was just a few years before that the "Flintville (TN) Monster" went on a rampage. That one was well documented by LEO's and newspaper though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Branco said:

It was just a few years before that the "Flintville (TN) Monster" went on a rampage. That one was well documented by LEO's and newspaper though.

I know that this is not on topic but if there was a fearsome bigfoot then did the LEO's hunt it down? I am going to look this up.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Branco, I'm at Table Rock Lake in Stone County, MO right now.  The folks I'm visiting have had similar experiences with peach trees and other fruit and vegetable crops being stripped overnight.  They've got a patch of woods on their property between the house and the lake and apparently they've got a family group that cycles through their property on a regular basis.  They've lived here for 20 years now and have stories ranging from a couple of direct sightings to significant and regular Class B behavior.  They also have goldfish pond with loose slate coping.  One of the larger slates is regularly removed and hidden like an Easter egg in various places around the property.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that post JDL; it made my day! From the town of Table Rock, you are only about 15 crow miles from where the "bird bath" incident occurred over in Taney County. As for the "hidden slate" deal, I laughed out loud. Folks that haven't messed with these boogers just can't comprehend or believe how danged smart they are and how mischievous - or as a lot of old folks down South say, "devilish" - they really are. I fully believe that some of their actions are simply to gain people's attention and let them know they are around. If people don't get riled up about their pranks they understand those folks are out to do them no harm and will continue to interact with them in a more civil and less aggravating manner. But, they are still going to steal food stuff from you when they can. Not out of malice; just making a living.

 

Oh, by the way; if you are fishing up there for bass, PM me and I'll tell you a bait that has been "wearing them out" down here in central AR. :D  

Regards

Edited by Branco
3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Tal.  They're actually in Cape Fair.  I've got them reading your book and trying to get them comfortable with the idea of talking with you.  The woman who owned this house before they did was perceived to be crazy.  More than once she fled the house in the middle of the night in abject fear.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank YOU JDL! I checked and saw there are two published sighting reports on the BFRO site from Cape Fair area of Stone County. There are several more from that county that are unpublished. I would love to talk to those folks!

 

I did an investigation, wrote a report, and testified in case heard in the federal court at Springfield several years ago. During that trial we took a break, and those that did, went outside to smoke. The attorney, the couple that I did the work for and I were discussing - of all things - their encounters with those boogers on their property. Unnoticed by us, the judge had also walked down and heard our discussion. He was an older and pleasant gentleman who grew up in an area close to the upper end of what is now the Harry S. Truman Lake. He walked over to us, smiled and asked if we were talking about MO-MO. The attorney, who also knew about the boogers from his parents and grandparents - told him we were - and went ahead to tell him about my hobby. The judge turned to me and grinned and told me about some the encounters he and his family had had with Mo-Mo when he was growing up. Before we went back inside he told me I should go to the upper end of the lake a little after dark before I went home. I spent two more days and nights at that location after the trial. Didn't see a booger but heard two "singing" the second night. (The judge is probably retired now, but I don't think he would give a flip about this post if he isn't. Straight shooting and no-nonsense "country" man.)    

 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunday, on the way into Cape Fair on State Highway 76 I was behind a white pickup with a bigfoot sticker on the back window that said "Believe" under it.  My 12 year old daughter got a kick out of it because I had been playing up the possibility that she might hear a bigfoot during our visit.

 

Seems that in Southern Missouri, anyone who has spent any length of time in rural areas is more than familiar with Mo-Mo.

 

I've got the folks following this thread.  I'm working toward an introduction by phone.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure hope they will share their knowledge!. It's amazing how many people in southern Missouri actually KNOW about them.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JDL said:

Sunday, on the way into Cape Fair on State Highway 76 I was behind a white pickup with a bigfoot sticker on the back window that said "Believe" under it.  My 12 year old daughter got a kick out of it because I had been playing up the possibility that she might hear a bigfoot during our visit.

 

Seems that in Southern Missouri, anyone who has spent any length of time in rural areas is more than familiar with Mo-Mo.

 

I've got the folks following this thread.  I'm working toward an introduction by phone.

That's awesome, that you're introducing your daughter to the idea of Bigfoot in such a nice way. :)

 

My bumper sticker (when I have the courage to make one someday) will expand on the "believe" thing. My bumper sticker will say, "Know that, if you are kind to them, they will be kind to you". And then it will say, "and you don't have to do anything special to be kind; you just have to be a generally peaceable person who respects living things -- no special bending-over-backward effort required."

 

And then I will run out of room and will have to rent one of those digital billboard things. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/19/2016 at 8:38 PM, Branco said:

 

Thank each of you for the kind remarks. When I have time I will share an incident that happened to me one night in my camper in Talladega County that certainly confirmed what I already believed. BF have a sense of humor and are world class pranksters. Remind me if I forget, ..........best I can remember, I turned 82 today. :(

Happy VERY Belated Birthday, Branco. Unless I missed it, consider this your reminder. I really enjoy your hard-won tales!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LeafTalker said:

And then I will run out of room and will have to rent one of those digital billboard things. 

 

LOL, I was gonna say, I think you are going to have to buy a semi and trailer to get all that on it. 

 

Another Happy belated Birthday wish for you Tal!

 

 

 

Not sure how common they are in other areas but here in East Texas there is something called a "Winter Pear". They're called that for a couple of reasons, one is they usually aren't ready until the fall and also because they aren't like normal eating pears you get from a store, they are rock hard and really only good for cooking with (make the best pear preserves you've ever eaten) They can be eaten fresh, but you wouldn't really enjoy it. But because they are so hard they will last a long time after being picked. The oldtimers would pick them when ready and make preserves out of some and save some for the winter since they also make great pear cobblers too. 

 

They were once common around here but the younger generation doesn't really understand they're not meant for the fruitbowl so about the only trees you find now are older ones that were planted near old homesteads. You can find then deep in the woods and you always know there was once a home nearby so be aware there is also and old well nearby too. And because most nowadays don't eat them, they just fall off the tree and are there for the animals.

 

I've always thought some of these Winter Pear trees deep in the woods or river bottoms would be a good place to stake out with a game cam or blind. I could see a BF knowing it's a good source of food and a stash of them would last through the winter. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, WesT said:

I don't know if ya'll have ever seen this or not, but it's a discussion in a Graybeard Outdoors forum by hunters in the midwest.

What animal in the midwest makes a loud 'whoop' sound?

The responses to that person's question were mostly worthless and some a little comical. 

3 hours ago, Gotta Know said:

Happy VERY Belated Birthday, Branco. Unless I missed it, consider this your reminder. I really enjoy your hard-won tales!

Thanks! You didn't miss it, but I'm gonna get started on it tonight. :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rockape: Didn't know about those pears!! Had I been able to get my hands on one I would have put it out there with my other eight pear trees - five different kinds. Man, there's one thing we are not going to run out of, and that's pear preserves! A LOT of time and work (and sugar) goes into making them but it's been a routine part our canning schedule for about sixty years. Now my kids, grand kids and great grand kids are addicted and would revolt if there were none to eat.

 

Year before last I drove a paring knife about half way through my left hand just below the thumb peeling and coring those suckers. A few stitches and I was ready for again last year. (A few years ago I put an ad in the local paper offering to trade six pints of them for a late model, low mileage, four-wheel drive Dodge Ram, but got no replies. I suppose folks just don't know the value of pear preserves now days.) :mad:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tal, spent many a day myself helping my mom and grandma can pear preserves. It's a lot of work but worth it when you eat 'em. Can't imagine breakfast without 'em. We were country folks and that's how we helped feed ourself. Not just pears either, we would spend all summer picking dewberries, blackberries, wild grapes, muscadines, they all make great jams and jellies. And wild plums, my favorite, make the best jelly. I guess we were kinda like a BF, the land provides the food if you know where to look. Fishing, hunting, gardens and picking wild fruit helped keep the grocery bills down. I feel sorry for folks who never had that experience. They've missed out on something in life. 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.