norseman

Bigfoot winter time survival

128 posts in this topic

On 11/29/2017 at 9:40 AM, SWWASAS said:

I see that I have been labeled dangerous.   Perhaps so.      Best way to keep an eye on me is do field work with me.     Since this thread is about winter BF survival,  I have wanted to get out on cross country skis in the snow and look for BF movement in the winter.     Not something expected by BF,  I know where to go that has been active at some point, but it is idiocy to go out in winter conditions on skis solo.     I used to be intermediate so would have to get up to speed again.        Someone would have to be  close to an intermediate cross country skier to do the areas I have in mind.    Move quietly,   stop and listen often, and see if we can pick up tracks?    Tracks in the winter have the potential to lead to winter dens or camps.    Anyone interested?     

I would be interested, I was an intermediate cross country skier (expert downhill skier). But that said my health may not allow. I'll see how it goes the next couple months, if all is good and I drop a few extra pounds, maybe I will be healthy enough in February or March. Not sure what areas you have in mind, hope the terrain isn't to extreme. I like the stealth moving quit and listen. Keeping my fingers crossed to be in better health and in better shape by then.  

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On 11/29/2017 at 9:40 AM, SWWASAS said:

I see that I have been labeled dangerous.   Perhaps so.      Best way to keep an eye on me is do field work with me.     Since this thread is about winter BF survival,  I have wanted to get out on cross country skis in the snow and look for BF movement in the winter.     Not something expected by BF,  I know where to go that has been active at some point, but it is idiocy to go out in winter conditions on skis solo.     I used to be intermediate so would have to get up to speed again.        Someone would have to be  close to an intermediate cross country skier to do the areas I have in mind.    Move quietly,   stop and listen often, and see if we can pick up tracks?    Tracks in the winter have the potential to lead to winter dens or camps.    Anyone interested?     

 

I can track up a ranger as well to punch in further.

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Sounds like a potential for getting more eyes, ears, knowledge and experience together in one place. And I really hope it turns out that way too. daveedoe, here's to your health, my friend. I hope you are able to succeed in your personal goals and I'm rooting for you to do so. If you get the opportunity to link up with SWWASAS and Norseman it would be great. And if your timing is such that early Spring works out then a Sasquatch carcass or skeleton find would have an even better chance, not only for looking, but for retrieving as well. I hope it all works out for first the two and then possibly the three of you.   

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Hiflier:  Sounds like a potential for getting more eyes, ears, knowledge and experience together in one place.

 

You are right and this is the joy of zoological puzzle. 

 

Norseman: My point is thus. Sasquatch does not create enough tracks in snow regions to be actively foraging or hunting in winter months. They must be like a chipmunk and have food caches. Sparsely found trackways could be them moving from an exhausted one to a fresh one? Once there they hunker down and spend some time.

 

I have many many miles under my belt on horseback, snowmobile, four wheeler, pick up, Peterbilt and even dog team in winter. I have ONE track way in 47 years to show for it. I sure would like to know the answer to that.

 

Bigfoot seems to avoid humans at all costs. The chipmunk theory is a good one, and may explain why more tracks are not found. This theory may entail an earthen den with stored food. What kind of foods?  One trackway in 47 years shows how illusive bigfoot is.

 

Another theory is the migration theory where bigfoot moves out of snow covered areas to warmer parts to continue hunting, gathering, and avoiding humans. Snowy ground with bigfoot tracks opens bigfoot location to human tracking.

 

Both theories may be at play. Why? Black Bears seem to den up in cold snowy areas.  I believe they are active all winter in western Oregon but den up in some of Eastern Oregon where the ground remains snow covered. 

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20 hours ago, daveedoe said:

I would be interested, I was an intermediate cross country skier (expert downhill skier). But that said my health may not allow. I'll see how it goes the next couple months, if all is good and I drop a few extra pounds, maybe I will be healthy enough in February or March. Not sure what areas you have in mind, hope the terrain isn't to extreme. I like the stealth moving quit and listen. Keeping my fingers crossed to be in better health and in better shape by then.  

I am not very current so would likely start on closed off logging roads that should be pretty tame skiing.     It would really be nice not to pay for the climb by having to walk down.    Just glide down on skis.   I like that on the fat tired mountain bike.  Ripping down effortlessly.      I need to get new ski gear.     I have the old three pin bindings and you cannot get good boots that use those any more.    It might be a curiousity to be on the skis in some areas.   Anything that gets them to come and look is a good thing.     It is just not something I want to do solo.     My ski partner does not ski any more so I quit because of that.  

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Alpine touring is your best bet.

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SWWASAS has mentioned the temperature inversion before. We are currently under a high pressure ridge that has created a temperature inversion. This morning for example the temperature  In the valleys Portland and Vancouver WA is around 29 degrees Fahrenheit, but if you go up in elevation Mt Hood Timberline Lodge the temp is 54 degrees Fahrenheit. The valleys are foggy except for the wind exposed area near the Columbia River Gorge. The Coast is also warmer with the off shore wind.  These conditions are the opposite of the norm. I wonder if Bigfoot would move up into the higher elevations during these conditions in the Cascade range, or out closer to the coast from the coast range and Olympics. We have been under these conditions for over a week and it looks like we will be under it for another week. I wonder if Bigfoot is aware of the changes and knows when to move.  It would be interesting to look at winter time sightings and weather history to see how many higher winter time sightings were under these conditions. 

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The key is fog.    BF would not have to be a rocket scientist to know that if the valleys are foggy and cold, the higher elevations are sunny and pleasant.    They live in the weather and are probably more adept at reading it than most of us.    I have visions, during these situations, of a SW facing ridge, and BF laying out scratching, and enjoying the sun.     Sure would beat weeks of rain.      Also,   humans are less likely to be in the mountains during these conditions which primarily happen mid winter.  

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