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wiiawiwb

Sasquatching Alone

93 posts in this topic

For many years, I did most of my hiking and bushwhacking alone. By contrast, back then almost all of my backpacking was with a friend to two or three. Nowadays, I do most of my sasquatching alone. I have two friends who join me whenever they can but if they're busy, out I go. 

 

I've always believed the best opportunity to be approached by a sasquatch is to be alone, or, to a lesser degree, with one other person.  There's no doubt in my mind that a sasquatch would be more willing to take a chance approaching a single person where there is no concern of having to account for the location of all the other humans.  I also find that when I'm alone all of my senses are focused like a laser beam on the environment around me. Sounds, smells, slight movements, and "that feeling". I'm on high alert for any signs that something has been moving about as I myself move.

 

When with others, conversation populates the time and I think that I am more likely to miss clues. The counter argument is that four eyes and ears are better than two but I think that conversation and laughter can distract from the recognizing clues. The one exception I can think of would be sasquatching alone but with a pooch. I've never done that but would love to.

 

So, with that said, do you prefer to sasquatch alone or with company?

 

Edited by wiiawiwb
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Mostly alone except for horses and/or mules and dogs.

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I get out both alone, and as part of a group of up to 4. Even as a group, we tend to split up for at least part of the outing, to cover more territory. I know what you mean, wiia, about heightened senses when out solo, Being an old semi retired guy, I get more opportunities to get out solo than with the group, but my age is now making me more aware of my limitations in remote locations. 

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What type of limitations?

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I have had better luck in small experienced groups wiiawiwb.  There is also a safety factor in numbers.  Whether or not the Bigfoot/Sasquatch is a threat, there are other critters out there we all are aware of that are a definite danger.  Anyone who treats the remote woods like it is just a sterile Disneyland excursion is setting themselves up for possible disaster.  case-in-point.  I was out by myself scouting out a remote creek bank near the area where my first close encounter occurred while night fishing with my son.  It was a cold clear beautiful day as I made my way through the woods.  I was about 50 yards from the creek along a game trail that ran perpendicular towards the creek,  Suddenly, I heard this deep guttural growl and a dark shape came charging up the creek bank about 100 yards from me.  It came into view and was a large barrel chested Pit Bull dog.  His head was held high sniffing and obviously had caught my scent searching for the source.  Then two more of these dogs came out of the brush following the leader.  One was a tri-color and the other dark brown.  They raced up the bank in a fast trot until the leader saw me trying to hide behind a much too thin tree.  There was no where to run hide or climb!!  All three dogs broke into a fast run towards me with ears pinned back and giving a constant growl.  Now if I was a casual day packer totally unprepared for this, I wouldn't be typing this reply now.  When the dog first broke out, I instinctively had my 45 ACP out(Which I legally carry), checked the clip and had it off safety and held ready by my side.  I tracked the dogs closing on me hoping they would turn away.  When they got about 50 feet away, I double tapped two rounds in front of them sending dirt, pieces of wood and possible hollow point shards into their faces.  All three skidded to a stop squinting and turning their heads from the debris slapping their faces then turned tail and ran back the way they came.  I turned the other way and scatted out of there.  Many asked my why I didn't shoot them.  Even though I hate the breed, I have owned dogs all my life and just didn't want to kill them unless absolutely necessary.  My point is this.  Unexpected things can happen out there and if you don't have plans in place for this bad things will happen.  I am retired law enforcement and NEVER go out in the woods without a large bore handgun discreetly tucked away on my person that no one will see unless its needed.  I could add snakes, broken legs etc. etc...That my two cents here folks...be safe!

 

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That's a rather scary encounter MO.  I had a similar event when I was a young teen, out in the woods,although not what I would call remote, walking along some trails.   Out of seemingly no where a lab comes running up, barking and exposing its teeth in an aggressive manner.  It stopped abut 15' short of me until its owner came walking up from a side trail. Ended up being a homeless man and his dog.  the encounter probably took seconds before the owner appeared but it froze me in my tracks until he did.  He collected his dog and left and I went about my way as well.   A rather startling event as it was happening.  

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I have been in that situation twice, and was unarmed both times, except for a stout walking stick. The first time it happened it was a pack of dogs and I had no choice but to charge them, screaming as loud as I could, waving my arms like a maniac.  They scattered like they had been shot with hot peas. The second time it was a Doberman, and I had to use the same strategy, which worked as well as the first time. I was shaking so bad after each encounter that I though I was going to puke.  NOT something I ever want to have to do ever again.  I agree, feral dogs are one of the biggest risks out there, especially for children.  

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9 hours ago, Midnight Owl said:

When the dog first broke out, I instinctively had my 45 ACP out(Which I legally carry), checked the clip and had it off safety and held ready by my side.  I tracked the dogs closing on me hoping they would turn away.  When they got about 50 feet away, I double tapped two rounds in front of them sending dirt, pieces of wood and possible hollow point shards into their faces.  All three skidded to a stop squinting and turning their heads from the debris slapping their faces then turned tail and ran back the way they came.  I turned the other way and scatted out of there.  Many asked my why I didn't shoot them.  Even though I hate the breed, I have owned dogs all my life and just didn't want to kill them unless absolutely necessary.  My point is this.  Unexpected things can happen out there and if you don't have plans in place for this bad things will happen.  I am retired law enforcement and NEVER go out in the woods without a large bore handgun discreetly tucked away on my person that no one will see unless its needed.  I could add snakes, broken legs etc. etc...That my two cents here folks...be safe!

 

 Just curious, if you're law enforcement why would you confuse a clip with a magazine?

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9 hours ago, Midnight Owl said:

There is also a safety factor in numbers.  Whether or not the Bigfoot/Sasquatch is a threat, there are other critters out there we all are aware of that are a definite danger.

 

And probably the most dangerous is the two footed version that wears clothes. Yes, going out in the woods alone and unarmed is not very smart in my opinion. Do at least one, if not both, for safety's sake.

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This will be my first season heading out into the field with intent to contact. My 'experience' that I originally had while fly fishing was terribly unplanned and awfully frightening.

 

I believe I will be heading out with one of my Blackfoot friends.

 

Do people here go out armed or unarmed? Bear spray will probably be my only go-to on this trip. I do have firearms but I'm afraid I'd just **** something off. Also I believe they know what they are.

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99.5% of my ventures out are solo. Usually no more than 3 nights but often just a day trip. I agree that going solo has the advantage of more focus but I'm not certain that is always a good thing as so many sightings are by folks just out there doing whatever and paying no particular mind.

I get out into the North Woods, it's a few hours drive in, often don't see another person or vehicle for 3 days so I go prepared. That includes a PLB and GPS. Topo maps and knowledge of the "box" or defined area I'm bushwhacking through. IE, where the river or stream is in relation to visible peak or ridges, which way the nearest logging rd runs because they are often not on maps..and I'll meander within that "known" area. And I also carry one of those large caliber pistols...cause one never knows.. Just being out there, in the middle of "nowhere" solo is something, feeds the soul I guess, but the occasional company is a nice change.

Edited by Kiwakwe
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 Knowing that the Sasquatch's are in the area, I prefer to have someone with me for safety. But the majority of my hikes have been by myself and I now have to over come the fear as I step out of the vehicle in the spooky places I go. I then just do it and off I go. Before knowing that the Sasquatch's were there, there was no worry about hiking. The bears and mountain lions never bothered me and still don't to this day. But even so, I enjoy being by myself, it's always been that way through the years. Besides, who's going to come with me on a stormy day or on a clear breezy day to climb to the top of a pine tree swaying in the wind, nobody!

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3 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

 Just curious, if you're law enforcement why would you confuse a clip with a magazine?

 

And what's to check?

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wiia, my ability to hike 40km out from a disabled vehicle to safety just isn't there any more. Some major invasive surgery 2 years ago has significantly reduced my stamina. I can still safely do 10 km, but then peter out for the day. I'm also aware that my bones are much more brittle now, at 73, than they were at 60, so I choose less challenging terrain when off trail. I still do it, but with less gusto than in my youth.

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9 hours ago, Incorrigible1 said:

And what's to check?

 

First and foremost, make sure the magazine is seated and locked in place properly.  It's easy enough to bump the mag release and have the magazine drop fractionally out of place.  It's not necessarily visible but if this happens, it's common for the magazine to fall out of the gun under recoil.   Second thing might be to confirm that the magazine is fully loaded. Third would be to make sure that the top cartridge is seated clear to the rear so it doesn't tie up the gun as they slide cycles.   

 

These are routine behaviors a seasoned semi-auto shooter does almost subconsciously .. instinctively.  

 

Revolver shooters have their own practices ... slightly different for single action vs double action shooters, but equally instinctive for seasoned shooters.   They become as ingrained as putting on your seat belt.  For noobs, the processes aren't so automatic and require conscious thought.

 

MIB

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