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It does look like a correlation. You guys might be onto something.

 

It can easily be done if you have the time. The SSR breaks down the sightings by month/year or by season...

 

Gotta find the migration overlays though. I'll see what I can find.

Edited by gigantor
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Ahhh depending on where in Colorado that is G, that's what I've been banging on about for years.

I had to pay for that overlay, $7.50 or something like that from a Hunting website and I bought the Mule deer one too.

If you take a look earlier in the thread on the first few pages somewhere I attached them and also Mangani's overlay.

What was even cooler was that clusters of sightings moved from one area to this area over a 4 or 5 year period and then remained, to this day.

I'm adamant that a patter of movement was found, especially when you tie in the dates of the sightings.

Here's the area I'm on about, with the Elk and Deer overlays.

I'll give you the % of when and where these sightings are both here and in the area where the previous clusters were before and after, when I get home from work.

post-136-0-68376400-1427789018_thumb.jpg

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I’ve been watching and reading silently …. And that’s hard to do sometimes but, I’m enjoying the conversation and appreciate the expertise and effort you guys have obviously placed in this topic. Very interesting.

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No expertise here Gumshore, just people that are dedicated and passionate about trying to make a difference.

G, have a look into Kamatchka, it's the PNW on steroids.

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Unfortunately, it looks like the State of WA department of Fish & Wildlife isn't as technically savvy as their CO counterparts. They don't collar Elk, Mule Deer, Bears, etc with satellite trackers in order to determine their migration routes and corridors.

 

They do document summer and winter ranges based on eyewitness observations, but a seven year old can do that. All they provide is a shaded area of the ranges, which of course is most of the State, so it's useless.

 

--- Begin Rant ---

Also, WA is run by a bunch of uhh... control freaks, and they've decided that public funded data should only be available to certain approved groups. So if you want the useless data they collect, you have to sign a non-disclosure agreement and justify your need for it. It's crazy and probably unconstitutional IMO, but nobody challenges them.

--- End Rant ---

 

Anyway, there is no data available for WA like there is for CO, WY, AR and some other States with big game. Too bad. I if were a WA resident I would contact my elected officials and demand they change that policy and maybe even challenge it in court (hint, hint).

Edited by gigantor
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You are right about WA. The best information will probably come from research papers as BobbyO is looking at. However, you can dig some population statistics out of the hunter reports. Won't help much with migration.

http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/search.php?Cat=Hunting

Look under: Game Harvest, Status and Trends

These are pdf files for previous years containing info gathered from required individual hunter reports. These are based on data gathering more than on scientific research.

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3 years I've been looking for decent WA information, never found anything even close to what I wanted unfortunately and only ever pull little bits and bobs like BigTree alluded to.

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Unfortunately, it looks like the State of WA department of Fish & Wildlife isn't as technically savvy as their CO counterparts. They don't collar Elk, Mule Deer, Bears, etc with satellite trackers in order to determine their migration routes and corridors.

 

They do document summer and winter ranges based on eyewitness observations, but a seven year old can do that. All they provide is a shaded area of the ranges, which of course is most of the State, so it's useless.

 

--- Begin Rant ---

Also, WA is run by a bunch of uhh... control freaks, and they've decided that public funded data should only be available to certain approved groups. So if you want the useless data they collect, you have to sign a non-disclosure agreement and justify your need for it. It's crazy and probably unconstitutional IMO, but nobody challenges them.

--- End Rant ---

 

Anyway, there is no data available for WA like there is for CO, WY, AR and some other States with big game. Too bad. I if were a WA resident I would contact my elected officials and demand they change that policy and maybe even challenge it in court (hint, hint).

I may be wrong here but from what I've read over the past few years about game and other animals in WA, they don't really migrate as such anyway, not in Western WA anyway.

In Eastern WA, yes, Deer move big distances but not so much in the west and the west is where the vast majority of Sasquatch reports are from in the State.

Of course game moves in elevation over the seasons but they don't seem to move large actual distances from what I've read.

The thing with Western WA is that it's generally so lush and abundant in food virtually year round that there isn't an over riding need for animals to constantly move, especially over large distances.

WA natives should be able to help where this is concerned more so than me, but that's just what I've gauged from what I've read these past few years.

Gigantor, have you managed to find anything where British Columbia is concerned at all ?

Also, I'm thinking that the best info to be taken on game in WA would be through looking at the specific GMU's and collating info, then analysing that as to where the bigger populations of deer at least, are and aren't, at the specific times of year, then breaking that down.

With regards to Elk, we know that there are the 11 ( or is it 10 ) core herds and then the split offs from them in the same general vicinity.

I'll still say though that Deer are the more probable prey for these things due to their numbers and lack of actual management in WA compared to Elk's, which are much lower and who are managed far more tightly.

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BobbyO and gigantor,

I can and have been sharing my personal observations with you since I have hunted both eastern and western Washington. But I am only one person there must be some other hunters that could assist here that also have experience with this area. And yes I am native to western Washington. I also know that you are looking at the same type environments in NW California (Bluff Creek), western Oregon, and western B.C.

You are right that most of the movements of animals on the west side are elevational rather than long distance. The elk spend summers on the higher ridges and hills and move into the valleys with snowfall. Of course this year they were probably in the higher elevations due to a complete lack of snow below 4000'.

In the Willapa Hills west of Interstate 5 I have seen the elk move down with snowfall in the morning and back up in the afternoon as it melted! The deer seem to hang around in the higher elevations longer which is really interesting because they are smaller animals than the elk.

Here is something else you might find interesting from a archery hunter's standpoint. Elk are easier to get close to than deer. If the wind is right and you can stand still, elk will walk right past you. I have had small herds walk right up to me many times. Camo doesn't matter if the other two things are observed. I guess being large herd animals they feel safer. They will be gone in a flash if the wind changes or they see you move! Blacktailed deer on the other hand are very hard to get close to, it's almost like they have a sixth sense that something is wrong.

If I were a sasquatch I would much rather hunt cow elk. Listen to find a herd (you can hear them feeding in the brush), approach downwind, stand still and wait (reported BF skills), the herd may walk right by you. Then all you need is the strength to do the job, a fist to the head or strong arm to the back and dinner is served. Or if they use them, a heavy branch for a club.

Just a little insight.

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Good post BigTree, and thanks.

This is why I split WA up into 5 core geographical zones though where the SSR is concerned, one them was the Willapa Hills too.

I believe that breaking down an area ( WA for example ) and focussing on that will yield patterns and trends, taking in to account the foliage, fauna and terrain as well as then getting an insight from locals ( especially hunters ) as to how things happen and why, in that particular area.

For me, that's the way we will possibly get an insight as to what Sasquatches are doing and where they are doing it, that's the plan anyway.

Add data, analyse data, continue to add data, continue to analyse, and hopefully build up a profile of how , why and where Sasquatches in specific locations actually do things.

It's very possible and I can assure anyone who is legitimately excited about the idea of this, that we are doing it daily.

But it isn't going to happen overnight because of regular life duties.

I'm hopeful that will change over the next couple of years though that will allow many more hours devoted to this.

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Glad to help. I do have a Wildlife Biology background, though that isn't what I do for a living currently. I do spend as much time in the field as my schedule allows. If you have questions I may be able to answer them, and some of them I may not.

And I think what you are doing is exciting!

Oh... As a postscript. I should have also included SE Alaska in my list of similar areas. They all have the Pacific maritime influence.

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