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norseman

120 volt red back saw

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norseman
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Catmandoo
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3 hours ago, norseman said:

 

Might be handy for stealth missions, small jobs.

 

Electric chainsaws are quiet. You could poach christmas trees.

The 120 volt rating brings up the question of charge time.

I did not check out the specs on the saw. Brush or brushless electric motor?  Makes a huge difference during hot dry times.  Brush motor sparks. Brushless motor is non-sparking. You could still have sparks at the bar with either one.

Edited by Catmandoo
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norseman
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2 minutes ago, Catmandoo said:

 

Electric chainsaws are quiet. You could poach christmas trees.

The 120 volt rating brings up the question of charge time.

 

Or use a chainsaw where they are not allowed. Or not draw attention to yer secret hunting trail.

 

Best answer was 90 minutes. I’d buy a spare battery.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Redback-18-in-120-Volt-Electric-Cordless-Chainsaw-106493/301978228

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Catmandoo
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12 minutes ago, norseman said:

Or use a chainsaw where they are not allowed. Or not draw attention to yer secret hunting trail.

 

Use bio oil for the bar and chain. Yes I know, the debate goes back and forth on bio oil, especially the cost. With conventional bar oil, you may leave a 'rainbow ( no gay stuff, the colors of the oil sheen )  sheen behind to give away your secret trail. Scoop up the shavings.

 

That saw is brushless motor and fast recharge. I don't think that I have seen it at Home Depot. Not too many urban loggers in Seattle.

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norseman
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10 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

 

Use bio oil for the bar and chain. Yes I know, the debate goes back and forth on bio oil, especially the cost. With conventional bar oil, you may leave a 'rainbow ( no gay stuff, the colors of the oil sheen )  sheen behind to give away your secret trail. Scoop up the shavings.

 

That saw is brushless motor and fast recharge. I don't think that I have seen it at Home Depot. Not too many urban loggers in Seattle.

 

Ive heard about using vegetable oil.

 

https://www.fs.fed.us/eng/pubs/html/98511316/98511316.html

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BC witness

Hunters here in BC have been using vegetable oil in the saws used to quarter large game animals (Moose, elk, bison) in the field for decades, to avoid contaminating the meat.

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Huntster
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5 minutes ago, BC witness said:

Hunters here in BC have been using vegetable oil in the saws used to quarter large game animals (Moose, elk, bison) in the field for decades, to avoid contaminating the meat.

 

Same here in Alaska. Meat chainsaws are obviously only used for meat. We only did that on large party hunts when we'd shoot several moose. When I hunt caribou solo I have a cordless reciprocal saw if I'm on the road system, or if it's a remote moose hunt with just a few guys, but when I go way up in the mountains, it's just a small hand meat saw.

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Catmandoo
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Food grade machinery oil and hydraulic oil is available. If I remember correctly, passing the qualifications for food grade in Canada has higher standards than the US.

 

1 hour ago, BC witness said:

Hunters here in BC have been using vegetable oil in the saws used to quarter large game animals (Moose, elk, bison) in the field for decades, to avoid contaminating the meat.

 

Should I guess Canadian made canola oil?

Veggie oil flings off of the bar/chain. In non-game butchering missions, the oil ends up on the ground,  grass,  bushes,  trees,  shrubs and whatever.  There is the potential of drawing in a bear when  the operator is in stealth mode or trail maintenance.

 

 

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BC witness

I agree, the scent of nice warm canola oil might be as attractive to a bear as a serving of French fries is to us, but since it's being used to carve up a large, fresh, bloody carcass, I'm already on high alert for Ursus, of whatever species, where I hunt. About 20 years ago, I was in the Yahk headwaters just a week before 2 elk hunters were killed by a sow grizzly and her cub, while packing the quarters out. Five years later, a couple of my buddies returned at dusk to the same campsite that I was using in that area, and were charged by a single grizzly, and were forced to shoot it. It fell dead at the feet of the guy closest to the campfire. After making the compulsory report to F&W, who came out to investigate, it was declared a genuine emergency kill.

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Catmandoo
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Perils of the woods.  Gun shot(s) can signal dinner bell. Even without dead meat, vegetable oil scent is risky.

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norseman
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8 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

Perils of the woods.  Gun shot(s) can signal dinner bell. Even without dead meat, vegetable oil scent is risky.

 

Bears do like their meat seasoned. We are really just cotton wrapped corn dogs. A little olive oil just makes it better...

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Catmandoo
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2 hours ago, norseman said:

Bears do like their meat seasoned. We are really just cotton wrapped corn dogs. A little olive oil just makes it better...

 

Tough and chewy on the outside, pink and crunchy on the inside. Wear a label that reads 'gluten free' and see what happens.

Edited by Catmandoo

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