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hiflier

The Genetic Markers Of A Sasquatch

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SWWASAS
53 minutes ago, hiflier said:

 

Hmm, I gave this some thought. First thing that cropped up is that Neanderthal is Homo. Older than Homo Sapiens for sure. But when Homo began, back before all of the different branching that we are discovering there was an LCA. This is where I'm hypothesizing that a Sasquatch-like species split off. From there the Homo line that got the good brain genes went on to branch out into Erectus, Australopithecine, Heidelbergensis, and all the rest up to Neanderthal, Denisovan, Red Deer Cave people, others, and Homo Sapiens. It would place Sasquatch very early, at a time when Homo branched off but well after the LCA where chimps branched off.

 

I'm hypothesizing that Homo didn't appear once the Chimp line split off. Instead, Chimps simply split from another primate that was the LCA of Humans and Sasquatch. THEN Homo split off because of the repaired NOTCH2NL gene with its  additional A,B,C variations, leaving Sasquatch behind with its advanced hairy body and ape brain. So Sasquatch essentially is a very highly evolved  Great Ape but only as far as it's physical make up is concerned. Under this hypothesis, Sasquatch WOULD be the missing link everyone has been searching for between us and all other knuckle-walking great primates. So its DNA would be danged close to ours by far over Chimpanzee DNA

To me the large massive upper body,  low slung head,  and resulting concentrated central core,  point to a species especially adapted to cold.    Just like the polar bear and Alaskan brown are adapted to cold.    Could it be that sasquatch made the Bering crossing not during the last ice age but one prior to that?    That would give it about 130,000 years of genetic isolation from all other human ancestral lines.     We know from  Australia and isolated islands that genetic isolation promotes species differentiation.         Since fossils of sasquatch have yet to be found on NA,   why should  we assume they migrated with humans the last ice age, the one before that, or even the one prior to that?    We are in a period of 100,000 year ice ages for the last two million years.    Would be interesting to time line chart where bigfoot would fit with other human ancestors with 130,000 or even the next earlier ice age of genetic isolation on North America.     When geographically isolated,   even though mating might produce viable hybrid offspring,   it cannot be done without a partner,    So during periods of geographic isolation,   BF morphology would be driven by adaptation to the environment and natural chance changes to DNA.     Just as recent finds of human presence in old strata are pushing the date of human activity in North America,   activity has not been found because no one thought to look in older strata.  So no one has been looking back further than 130,000 years for humans or bigfoot.   

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wiiawiwb
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8 hours ago, Twist said:

We’re thriving, they are not........

 

Perhaps they are thriving as much as they wish to be.  Humans tend to be, generally speaking, communally oriented.  Maybe sasquatches prefer a more sparsely-populated environment.  Can you prove otherwise?

 

 

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Twist

Can we prove anything with BF?   
 

Didn’t think so.....

Edited by Twist

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Huntster
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7 hours ago, norseman said:

.......From a biological standpoint the Sentinelese are a dead end. Their genes will die out........

 

Exactly like sasquatches are. So, again, the similarity between the Sentinelese and sasquatches in that regard as well isn't the brain size, tool use, or taxonomic identity, but the behavior. 

 

........Are they happy? Who knows.... We are romantic about primitive lifestyles. They may secretly dream about something akin to Disneyland while gorging themselves on slushes and cotton candy.......

 

Well, if they're anything like the Huntster Caveman species, Disneyland would be a very dangerous place. Mr. Security Supervisor would use some serious tools on them. I don't think they'd like it.

 

.........There is a ship run aground on the island.

I bet they know more about us than we think they do.

 

Like how we taste.:lol:

 

 

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Twist
2 minutes ago, Huntster said:

Like how we taste.:lol:

 

 

 
Im guessing chicken.  Seems a safe bet. :D

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Huntster
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12 hours ago, Twist said:

 Im guessing chicken.......

 

No way. We're definitely a red meat. I bet homo sapien meat is pretty good stuff to a predator. The predators that do it sure seem to like it,

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Twist

I hope to never find out!!! 

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norseman
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29 minutes ago, Huntster said:

 

No way. We're definitely a red meat. I bet homo sapien meat is pretty good stuff to a predator. The predators that do it sure seem to like it,


Chicken = Dinosaur. I would not have been happy in the Cretaceous....

 

The Chinese report that humans taste like pork. Two legged swine. 
 

My favorite is Beef and shellfish....but I do love bacon!

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SWWASAS

Maybe that is why the Chinese have trouble with creating infectious disease?    They eat to many of each other?   Cannibalism promotes disease in a species.    I take so much medicine now my meat has to taste bad.   (Notice to all bigfoot my meat is nasty)    

 

I just had a thought about my previous post.      Humans leave evidence of their presence in old strata containing animal kills.  We leave tools,  arrow and spear heads, fire rings,  and sign we have worked bones with scrapers and broken bones to collect marrow.     Without use of fire and tools,   BF leaves little evidence they have harvested an animal.     The only evidence that BF would leave is tooth marks.   If those are not noticed or assumed to be some scavenger a very old kill in 100,000 plus strata would be simply assumed to be a natural or death attributed to some other predator.     The more I look at this the more likely I think BF migrated before the last ice age. 

 

   

Edited by SWWASAS
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SWWASAS

Here are some recent findings to support my theory that BF arrived before humans.      Notice that the only tools that seemed to be used were the large rocks to smash the bones and extract the marrow.  Bigfoot uses rocks to throw and smash.     Human ancestors in elsewhere on the planet were using rock scrapers at the time.   Also notice that whatever did this could not have been modern human because they did not move out of Africa before 50,000 to 80,000 years ago.     The authors of the study even theorize it could have been a species unknown to science.       So we have an unknown species in North America 130,000 years ago using rocks like BF does but not using scraper tools or projectile points like man was at the time.       Also unlike man at a mammoth kill, there was no indicatiion of fire at the site, because humans would subsist for weeks on the kill and keep a fire going to keep predators away.        The only thing that could point more directly at bigfoot would be if they found 20 inch or better footprints in the soil layers.     https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/26/science/prehistoric-humans-north-america-california-nature-study.html

Edited by SWWASAS
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Huntster
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4 hours ago, norseman said:

.......The Chinese report that humans taste like pork. Two legged swine......

 

I've read that it's rather sweet. I've read the same of horse meat, but have never had the opportunity to try it.

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hiflier
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3 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

Here are some recent findings to support my theory that BF arrived before humans.      Notice that the only tools that seemed to be used were the large rocks to smash the bones and extract the marrow.  Bigfoot uses rocks to throw and smash.     Human ancestors in elsewhere on the planet were using rock scrapers at the time.   Also notice that whatever did this could not have been modern human because they did not move out of Africa before 50,000 to 80,000 years ago.     The authors of the study even theorize it could have been a species unknown to science.       So we have an unknown species in North America 130,000 years ago using rocks like BF does but not using scraper tools or projectile points like man was at the time.       Also unlike man at a mammoth kill, there was no indicatiion of fire at the site, because humans would subsist for weeks on the kill and keep a fire going to keep predators away.        The only thing that could point more directly at bigfoot would be if they found 20 inch or better footprints in the soil layers.     https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/26/science/prehistoric-humans-north-america-california-nature-study.html

 

Couple that with the amount of time G. Blacki was around......: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigantopithecus_blacki

 

"Gigantopithecus blacki is an extinct species of prehistoric apes that existed from perhaps nine million years to as recently as one hundred thousand years ago, at the same period as Homo erectus would have been dispersed."

 

.....and one could surmise that since G. Blacki was a bamboo eater, and the Bigfoot was omnivorous, then it may be that their paths in Asia didn't cross very often. It may be closer to surmise that Sasquatch and Homo erectus may have had a tussle or two though. But Erectus had tools and probably weapons and, while out-sized, may have been able to keep Sasquatch on the move toward, and then crossing, the land bridge. After the last warming of the planet Sasquatch became trapped in North America while the rest of them left back in Asia slowly died out or went to the more remote areas- just like what is happening here now.

 

It's all speculation, of course, but since there are so many holes on not only our history but Sasquatch's as well it is okay to speculate. One thing might be worth thinking about, G. Blacki and Sasquatch may both have had the two Chimp/Gorilla 2 NOTC2NL genes that didn't do anything brain wise. Erectus however DID have the two (with the repaired gene) and more, just like the Homo line in general back then, along with the later Denisovans and Neanderthals. My understanding is that Denisovans and Neanderthals had three of the genes and we modern Humans have the four. It makes me wonder if future Humans will have five and that it would allow for brain enlargement and power that we can't even fathom. So much to learn....   

Edited by hiflier

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hiflier
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Aftersome more reading it looks like Gigantopithicus is more closely related to Orangutans. Orabgutans split off eleven million years ago. G. Blacki, nine million years ago. That means that, like Orangutans, it more than likely didn't have the dual NOTCH2NL gene that Chimpanzees and Gorillas have. I'm just trying to keep this hominid line stuff straight.  So, Orangutans, THEN Gigantopithicus, THEN Gorillas, THEN Chimpanzees, and THEN my hypothetical Sasquatch, And THEN the Homo line with all of its species branches that eventually included ours.  

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SWWASAS

Even the presumption that  G. Blacki was a bamboo eater is not as important perhaps when you consider other vegetarian apes turn to meat when their food supplies get stressed.     A Bering crossing certainly would create stresses on any animals food sources.  Climatic variation and food sources,  are the principal reasons behind migrations.      Who knows,   perhaps some had followed the coast North in Asia, and then they got cut off by glaciers behind them,  and  forcing them to move North and East.     That region of the North Pacific is also on the ring of fire.    Volcanic eruptions could force or block migration routes.    Perhaps a study of the geology of North East Asia during the ice ages would fill in the story.   

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hiflier
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Yeah, Northeast China had a couple of large eruptions around 11,000 and 14,000 ago. Crater Lake about between 5-6 thousand years ago. Meteor (bollide) impacts could be a factor too but I don't remember reading of any back when I was doing climate research and the five great extinctions after Earth's 2 billion years history of just having bacterial colonies. The colonies were anaerobic and produced oxygen as a byproduct the way plants do today. The colonies were so widespread that they suffocated themselves to near extinction with their own oxygen output. There's a few ancient stromatolite colonies left here and there. One's in Michigan:

 

Stromatolites.jpg.626c3fa55262f8b1144425eeacc739bc.jpg

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