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Could a Bigfoot be living near your home without you knowing?

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CharlesLamica

I think sasquatches are migratory.  I don't know how long of a migration route they might have each year, but I know that my own experiences tell me they tend to be in certain areas at certain times of the year.  For instance, I live in northeast Washington and regularly go squatching in a national forest that is very close to my house.  I've had a number of sasquatch-related activities in one particular area where I horse-pack or jeep into for camping.  But, those activities only seem to happen in October and May.  Fall, and then again in Spring.  It would seem to indicate the sasquatches are not in that area year-round.  I believe they are passing through the area at those times, and may stop and hang out for a few weeks, as long as the food sources are available, then move on to another place.

 

In my part of the country, we are blessed to have huge tracts of national forests, wild land, and undeveloped properties.  In other parts of the country, where there is less undeveloped land, it makes sense that sasquatches still have to migrate as they follow food sources, and this migration is bound to take them through or near communities or subdivisions that are on the border of woodlands and forests.  I don't believe they stay there for long periods of time, but probably long enough that there is a sighting every once in a while.

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MIB
7 hours ago, CharlesLamica said:

I think sasquatches are migratory. 

Agreed.   Like  you observe, the activity in each location near me seems to be seasonal and repeating.    The problem I run into is that several of the locations have activity simultaneously yet are a good distance apart.   Some patterns suggests multiple groups moving across certain locations but at different times, others suggest multiple small groups merging temporarily, then dispersing outwards along established pathways.    The thing is, the data available to me is not quite complete enough to nail those down because some of the patterns do repeat but seemingly skip years. 

 

MIB

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Madison5716

I'm going back to where it all started for me, very soon. It's the same time of year, and I'd like to test the hypothesis that they are there seasonally.

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ShadowBorn
Posted (edited)

we are screwed in the yying yang

Edited by WV FOOTER
Edit Profanity

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Twist

^^^^ What’s that even mean???

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Incorrigible1
Posted (edited)

You may find this interesting. In 2003, a mountain lion was captured NE one of Omaha's busiest intersections. The '03 article I'm posting mentions the possibility the cat could become a denizen of Omaha's world-class zoo, which did happen. He lived well for a good number of years (I visited him several times), and passed on recently.

 

https://www2.ljworld.com/news/2003/oct/03/captured_mountain_lion/

 

The mountain lion captured in urban Omaha is more likely to go to a zoo than to be released back into the wild, a state Game and Parks Commission official said.

The state agency will decide with the help of the Henry Doorly Zoo what to do with the large cat captured Wednesday near one of Omaha’s busiest intersections, 114th Street and West Dodge Road.

The game and parks commission does not release mountain lions in Nebraska, said Mace Hack, the commission’s head of wildlife research.

The commission is looking into releasing the lion to another state, Hack said.

But states that would be good homes for mountain lions — such as Colorado and Wyoming — already have plenty of them, Hack said.

There is also a concern that if the mountain lion wandered into an urban area once, he might do it again.

“This isn’t such a great candidate. … for release even if other states were willing to take it,” Hack said.

Hack said there were no good locations in Nebraska — away from both people and livestock — where it would be safe to release a mountain lion.

“People don’t want it basically,” he said. “Nor do we want to put people at risk, nor the animal at risk. We have never released mountain lions, and we probably never will.”

The mountain lion was recovering Thursday from surgery at the Henry Doorly Zoo. Zoo Director Lee Simmons said three shotgun pellets were removed from the animal’s hip and thigh.

 

Soon after Simmons shot the animal with a tranquilizer dart, a police officer shot the animal with his shotgun when the cat lunged at him. The mountain lion was captured minutes later after the tranquilizer took effect.

Because the animal’s claws weren’t worn from walking on concrete and it was so aggressive, Simmons said he was certain the cat was wild and had never been a pet.

Simmons said the lion would need to recover from his injuries before a final decision is made about his future.

No pellets remain in the lion, but it is suffering nerve damage in the leg, Simmons said. He said a pellet possibly could have nicked a nerve.

The male mountain lion weighed in Thursday at 108 pounds — heavier than previously thought. It is almost 7 feet long from his nose to the tip of his tail, and 2.5 feet tall, Simmons said.

Simmons said he believed the cat wandered into the area along the Platte River and then up the Big Papillion Creek, which runs through Omaha near where the cat was found.

It probably fed on rabbits and dogs, and would have been a threat to small children, he said.

It was the first confirmed sighting of a mountain lion in the eastern third of the state, according to the Game and Parks Commission.

Mountain lions, also called cougars or pumas, had not turned up in Nebraska for more than a century until a deer hunter in the Pine Ridge area killed one in 1991.

Since then, there have been 10 confirmed sightings in western and central Nebraska.

---------------------------------------------------

This is a 2003 story. Since then, cougars have continued to move into eastern Nebraska, and are not uncommon.

FYI

 

Edited by Incorrigible1

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norseman
On 8/17/2019 at 8:34 AM, CharlesLamica said:

I think sasquatches are migratory.  I don't know how long of a migration route they might have each year, but I know that my own experiences tell me they tend to be in certain areas at certain times of the year.  For instance, I live in northeast Washington and regularly go squatching in a national forest that is very close to my house.  I've had a number of sasquatch-related activities in one particular area where I horse-pack or jeep into for camping.  But, those activities only seem to happen in October and May.  Fall, and then again in Spring.  It would seem to indicate the sasquatches are not in that area year-round.  I believe they are passing through the area at those times, and may stop and hang out for a few weeks, as long as the food sources are available, then move on to another place.

 

In my part of the country, we are blessed to have huge tracts of national forests, wild land, and undeveloped properties.  In other parts of the country, where there is less undeveloped land, it makes sense that sasquatches still have to migrate as they follow food sources, and this migration is bound to take them through or near communities or subdivisions that are on the border of woodlands and forests.  I don't believe they stay there for long periods of time, but probably long enough that there is a sighting every once in a while.

 

In our country the million dollar question is what happens during winter? How does a 800 lbs primate get enough groceries, without being detected when other 800 lbs omnivores are fast asleep?

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BlobSquatch

Deer and Elk come down lower where there is food to forage in winter.

While it snows to beat the band here (4 ski resorts) I see them in the winter more because 9800ft is lower than the 10 and 11,000 feet the used to haunt when it's hot. So, oh there's foot to eat. Tasty too.

 

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Huntster
17 hours ago, Incorrigible1 said:

........This is a 2003 story. Since then, cougars have continued to move into eastern Nebraska, and are not uncommon.........

 

 

Were lions known in eastern Nebraska longer ago, like in the 19th Century?

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Huntster
1 hour ago, norseman said:

In our country the million dollar question is what happens during winter? How does a 800 lbs primate get enough groceries, without being detected when other 800 lbs omnivores are fast asleep?

 

Some possibilities:

 

1) Meat caching, which bears do even during the non-winter, and which helps explain why sometimes sasquatches stink like bears or stray dogs that roll in carrion

 

2) They follow deer and elk down in elevation as the snows drive them lower, anyway, so hunting is still very possible

 

3) There are still a remarkable number of anadromous fish runs in the PNW in mid-winter, and I'm hoping to get into some of those winter steelhead and striper runs myself.

 

4) Again along the coast and lowest elevations, clam tides expose a hearty enough dinner in mid-winter to attract plenty of humans

 

5) Sasquatch activity level goes down, which reduces food intake needs a bit

 

6) Humans (to detect said sasquatches that are now closer to human habitations) are more prone to stay indoors or in town during winter and school season.

 

7) I'm always amazed when folks in the coastal PNW talk about winter as if it was some kind of burden. I travel through regularly from southcentral Alaska in mid-winter ow, and it's like a Garden of Eden compared to home, just like my home is balmy compared to the Arctic North Slope. And even here brown bears commonly wake up mid-winder and wander about.

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norseman
31 minutes ago, Huntster said:

 

Some possibilities:

 

1) Meat caching, which bears do even during the non-winter, and which helps explain why sometimes sasquatches stink like bears or stray dogs that roll in carrion

 

2) They follow deer and elk down in elevation as the snows drive them lower, anyway, so hunting is still very possible

 

3) There are still a remarkable number of anadromous fish runs in the PNW in mid-winter, and I'm hoping to get into some of those winter steelhead and striper runs myself.

 

4) Again along the coast and lowest elevations, clam tides expose a hearty enough dinner in mid-winter to attract plenty of humans

 

5) Sasquatch activity level goes down, which reduces food intake needs a bit

 

6) Humans (to detect said sasquatches that are now closer to human habitations) are more prone to stay indoors or in town during winter and school season.

 

7) I'm always amazed when folks in the coastal PNW talk about winter as if it was some kind of burden. I travel through regularly from southcentral Alaska in mid-winter ow, and it's like a Garden of Eden compared to home, just like my home is balmy compared to the Arctic North Slope. And even here brown bears commonly wake up mid-winder and wander about.

 

Its possible that they migrate to the coast and dine on seafood and balmy weather during winter.

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Huntster

I'm confident that they migrate down in elevation throughout their PNW range, and those in the Coast Range and Cascades likely go west. In your neck of the woods, winter isn't as rosy. There is still snow at lower levels. But that's where the deer and elk are, and every few winters, a top quality sasquatch trackway is found in the snow in central/eastern Washington in mid-winter..........maybe looking for food?

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Incorrigible1
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

Were lions known in eastern Nebraska longer ago, like in the 19th Century?

Yes, in historical times. They were extirpated by 1900 from the state.

 

I think back on childhood, and how my friends and I would spend entire days away from home, roaming the nearby Platte river, during the Sixties. Our parents were unconcerned with our safety, as there was really nothing too dangerous for us to encounter.

 

Now? If I had a child, I'd have to give great consideration to allowing them the freedom I enjoyed. Mountain lions are known to exist in that same country I roamed and loved so much.

Edited by Incorrigible1

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Huntster
7 hours ago, Incorrigible1 said:

..........I think back on childhood, and how my friends and I would spend entire days away from home, roaming the nearby Platte river, during the Sixties. Our parents were unconcerned with our safety, as there was really nothing too dangerous for us to encounter.

 

Now? If I had a child, I'd have to give great consideration to allowing them the freedom I enjoyed. Mountain lions are known to exist in that same country I roamed and loved so much.

 

There were snakes, weren't there?

 

I was able to ride my bicycle all over north Orange County as a kid in the early 60's. Now you'd get run over, raped, or kidnapped. Lots of lions in south Orange County, too, and they have killed people there more than once over the past 30 years.

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norseman
9 hours ago, Incorrigible1 said:

Yes, in historical times. They were extirpated by 1900 from the state.

 

I think back on childhood, and how my friends and I would spend entire days away from home, roaming the nearby Platte river, during the Sixties. Our parents were unconcerned with our safety, as there was really nothing too dangerous for us to encounter.

 

Now? If I had a child, I'd have to give great consideration to allowing them the freedom I enjoyed. Mountain lions are known to exist in that same country I roamed and loved so much.

 

I roamed the mountains as a child by myself with Bears, Cougars and Wolves. I think it was more of a sign of the times than anything else. (I was 70’s)

 

People just didn’t worry about things that could happen as much. When the seats were full in Mom’s 64 T bird? I rode in the back window....

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