Jump to content

Got Coyotes!


Recommended Posts

guyzonthropus

I grew up in the foothills above pasadena ca, one house from the brush, and we had coyotes around all the time, along with mtn lions, bobcats, foxes and bears. Back in 2011 I moved back up into that area, 2 houses from the bush, and across the canyon, and once again encounted the pack. One night there was a lot of activity just to the east of the house so I perked up and listened. At one point I heard what sounded like a double knock to the north(closer to the brush) followed by an "almost coyote-esque" sorta noise. Then from the south, coming up a road behind the house, I heard a similar noise followed by three distinct sounds, a moment later the same noise, closer, with only two following sounds, then closer still, but still along the road, with but a single follow up sound. Now I can't say for certain that it wasn't a coyote, but I've never heard, or heard of, coyotes counting down from three, and along with the possible knocks, I had the feeling that the big furries were around, and maybe used the countdown as a proximity indicator perhaps. The whole area is rich with deer and other smaller mammals. 

I've since moved about 30 miles east and maybe a mile down from the brush(hoping to avoid the worst of possible brushfires) yet I still see coyotes in my backyard looking for cats, as well as the occasional bobcat...

Link to post
Share on other sites
vinchyfoot
On 10/15/2020 at 6:36 AM, DaleyWoodbeater said:

Apparently squatches imitate coyote howls.

 

That's what Moneymaker said on Finding Bigfoot anyway.

Moneymaker makes stuff up on twitter daily. Not to be taken seriously

Here in the northeast, we have coyotes, coydogs and coywolves, they pack together in the late winter and they are shades of the same thing based on genetic drift, they are in the woods and suburbs and getting used to people.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They can kill your dogs or cats if you have any.  They won't mess with a big dog to often but they can kill a large sized dog by tiring it out .

Link to post
Share on other sites
Madison5716

When I lived in Los Angeles, 3 blocks off Ventura Blvd. in the Valley, I had one kill a cat under my bedroom window. Coyotes are dang near everywhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/17/2020 at 3:40 PM, vinchyfoot said:

Moneymaker makes stuff up on twitter daily. Not to be taken seriously

Here in the northeast, we have coyotes, coydogs and coywolves, they pack together in the late winter and they are shades of the same thing based on genetic drift, they are in the woods and suburbs and getting used to people.

 

Where in the NE do we have coywolves?

 

Or is that just a fancy way to say coyote that may have wolf genes from 500 years ago?

Link to post
Share on other sites

@NatFoot

"The wolflike canid that ranges from Ohio to the Carolinas and northeast to Newfoundland and Labrador is not a coyote, but a hybrid of the coyote, wolf and domestic dog.  The animal that we call coyote is more aptly named “coywolf”.  Coywolves were first documented in Canada in the early 20th century and by the 1930’s they had reached Maine.  The L.C. Bates Museum in Hinckley contains a strange looking specimen purported to be a wolf killed in Calais, Maine around 1910.  It looks nothing like the coy wolves of today.  

The fact that Maine’s coywolves are hybrids of coyotes and wolves is not new news.  The recent article by Deirdre Fleming (Maine coyotes getting bigger, more wolflike PPH 5/7/2017) unfortunately sensationalizes and unfairly demonizes an animal that scientists have known about and studied for decades.  These hybrids are more wolf-like than coyotes and more coyote-like than wolves.  They can and do take down deer, but they are also opportunists and scavengers.   A study of deer carcasses conducted by researchers at the State University of New York showed that just eight percent of adult deer on which coywolves were feeding in winter “…had been killed conclusively…” by coywolves.  

Coywolves are native to Maine.  They are not an invasive species.  Their existence in Maine is the result of a natural immigration to fill a void in the ecosystem created by humans when we exterminated wolves.  No one brought them here and over the last century or so, they have become an integral part of the ecosystem."

from: http://mainewolfcoalition.org/education-and-outreach/coywolves/

 

http://www.thewildlifenews.com/2010/01/07/in-new-england-coywolves/

 

https://www.timberwolfinformation.org/ma-coyote-or-wolf-animals-in-massachusetts-may-be-both-coywolf/

 

Edited by Kiwakwe
  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
vinchyfoot
19 hours ago, NatFoot said:

 

Where in the NE do we have coywolves?

 

Or is that just a fancy way to say coyote that may have wolf genes from 500 years ago?

 

The general thought is they moved eastern from points further west, I've also heard of a wolf release somewhere in Quebec The province, not the city and it's possible that they have just branched out over time. Think what you want but they are throughout New England, the appearance is subtly different and the tracks are as well.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Eastern Slopes

Here in Alberta they are everywhere. They adapt very well to living around people and, considering their population density, don't cause a lot of problems. Every few years there will be a panic about devil worshipers and animal sacrifices when a few cats get found eviscerated in the suburbs before it's determined to be the yodel-dogs, but that's about it.

 

A couple quick ice-fishing related coyote stories:

 

I was out in December, early ice, only one there at a quiet spot. I was set up in about 6-7 feet of water about 75 yards out. Around dusk I packed up and was dragging my sled of gear to shore. About half way back, I looked behind me as I always do to see if I've left anything or if anything fell off the sled, and there was already a coyote nosing around my fishing holes for old bait. I just carried on.

 

One March a few friends and I were doing our annual campout on the ice. I got up early Sunday morning, got the tea on and a line down the hole when a pack of coyotes started going crazy fairly near by. You can tell when they are just singing, but this time they were very excited about something.  I looked out the tent flap and three or four hundred yards away someone's medium-small fuzzy house dog was out in the middle of the lake, with a coyote staring him down. I didn't look for long, as I had fishing to do and I already knew how the story would end. The dog was never going to reach the shore.

 

 

Edited by Eastern Slopes
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Huntster
2 hours ago, Eastern Slopes said:

......A couple quick ice-fishing related coyote stories.........

 

If I'm going to be camped on the ice for a few days/nights, I'll take the first filleted fish carcass out 150 yards from camp and wire it to the ice. I'll look out at it every time I exit the tents........

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/22/2020 at 8:21 PM, NatFoot said:

 

Where in the NE do we have coywolves?

 

Or is that just a fancy way to say coyote that may have wolf genes from 500 years ago?

No it's cross of a yote and wolf 

 

Saw a dead one  up close  in the back of a pickup  . It wasn't a coyote and it was shot in CT

I've seen and shot coyotes ,it wasn't a coyote . 

 

It was huge 

Edited by 7.62
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
NatFoot
On 10/17/2020 at 3:40 PM, vinchyfoot said:

Moneymaker makes stuff up on twitterdaily. Not to be taken seriously

Here in the northeast, we have coyotes, coydogs and coywolves, they pack together in the late winter and they are shades of the same thing based on genetic drift, they are in the woods and suburbs and getting used to people.

 

Thanks all. I wasn't being sarcastic. I was generally curious.

Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...