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Lure one in or wait?


wiiawiwb
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The proverbial chicken-or-the-egg question is one we all have to deal with. Can we lure them in or do they arrive only on their terms? I honestly don't know but part of the fun of being out in the field is guessing.  

 

My latest attempt will be to try to make the campsite impossible to ignore.  It's hard to believe (for me), as I tend to be a traditionalist, but I'm actually considering using a FRED emergency device. In a way, it feels awkward (even cheesy) but if it catches the eye of a curious sasquatch, maybe it can produce. The FRED emergency device was designed for those who break down on the road. It is a warning device that sends out red strobe, or circling, lights designed to alert oncoming cars . You can't miss it.

 

My hopes are it attracts the attention of a sasquatch across one of the ponds I frequent. Maybe it decides to come in a bit closer to investigate knowing humans are over across the pond and it is safe on their side. The thermal should be able to capture its movements.

 

I'll give it a try and report back.

 

 

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25 minutes ago, wiiawiwb said:

The proverbial chicken-or-the-egg question is one we all have to deal with. Can we lure them in or do they arrive only on their terms? I honestly don't know but part of the fun of being out in the field is guessing.  

 

My latest attempt will be to try to make the campsite impossible to ignore.  It's hard to believe (for me), as I tend to be a traditionalist, but I'm actually considering using a FRED emergency device. In a way, it feels awkward (even cheesy) but if it catches the eye of a curious sasquatch, maybe it can produce. The FRED emergency device was designed for those who break down on the road. It is a warning device that sends out red strobe, or circling, lights designed to alert oncoming cars . You can't miss it.

 

My hopes are it attracts the attention of a sasquatch across one of the ponds I frequent. Maybe it decides to come in a bit closer to investigate knowing humans are over across the pond and it is safe on their side. The thermal should be able to capture its movements.

 

I'll give it a try and report back.

 

 

I am all for mixing it up.  You won’t know until you try.  
 

I would try it one night in camp.  The next time I would set it up somewhere where you could keep an eye on it from a distance away.  
 

It could be that this device gives off such a unique light (far different than a flashlight, lantern, or campfire) that it would prove irresistible…curiosity would be overwhelming.  
 

 

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Mixing it up is a good plan, I think. I will try out my crow call more, and if I can get my hands on a dog whistle, I will try that, too. I also want to set up a bluetooth speaker near a "decoy tent", and play the sounds of an infant cooing, and / or crying and see what kind of a response I get, if any. 

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16 hours ago, NorthWind said:

Mixing it up is a good plan, I think. I will try out my crow call more, and if I can get my hands on a dog whistle, I will try that, too. I also want to set up a bluetooth speaker near a "decoy tent", and play the sounds of an infant cooing, and / or crying and see what kind of a response I get, if any. 

Get an owl call, you'll have a blast with it!

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18 hours ago, NorthWind said:

I will try out my crow call more

 

Do you have audio of Ravens?  Do you have audio of snoring?  

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I think anything you do that gets them curious is good.    Draws them in.     Our problem is that they are so much better at approaching undetected, that even if we can draw them in,  they stay just out of our sight.   I think when my area was active I was watched most of the time.  When they know exactly where you are it is easy for them to avoid being seen.    My hope was always to be unpredictable and have them blunder into me as they did on my first encounter.    My best advice is to listen for low frequency sounds.  They are pretty good at avoiding breaking brush and snapping things when in slow approach mode out of curiousity,  but they are so heavy that you can just hear their heavy soft footfalls when they get close enough.    When something that is the same color as most tree bark peeks around at you it is difficult to see that unless you see some motion associated with the peeking.     I suppose if you work with a partner you could practice picking up the nearly inaudible sounds of them moving.     Take turns dropping a large rock onto the soft forest floor.     Keep dropping it from a lower and lower height to train your ears to pick it up.   It took me several years to pick up on the low frequency sound.   It is possible, and I do not have any evidence to support it, that we might be able to detect through body feel,  infrasound that they broadcast.     On one digital recording,  I recorded single arriving pressure waves.    Never heard it but suppose in the right situatiom might feel it in the body.    Of course the source of the sound could have been a distant sonic boom or thunderstorm too.  In the West US there are a lot of military restricted areas where people bust the sound barrier.    

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On 7/21/2021 at 6:27 PM, wiiawiwb said:

Can we lure them in or do they arrive only on their terms?

 

Semantics .. shades of gray.   I think we can attract their attention, lure in that sense, but they make a conscious choice about how, and whether, to react.   When it comes to bigfoot, we compel nothing.     It is safer for us that way.    Critters that have been lured in can become aggressive when they find themselves frustrated, surprised, etc unable to actually obtain the bait that drew them in.    I don't want to deal with that especially in the context of bigfoot.

 

MIB

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My first few sightings have all been at camp. The first sighting was with glow stick hung over a two track six to eight feet in the air. It was baited with can salmon holes poked into it. So it was in a way lured in.  But in my opinion is just setting up camp in a hot zone.  Then wait for what ever may happen. But like we all know it does not happen all the time.

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13 minutes ago, ShadowBorn said:

But in my opinion is just setting up camp in a hot zone.  Then wait for what ever may happen.

 

I think that is the best answer we have.    We truly don't know what triggers a visit vs what prevents one.    When we do a particular thing, we actually do quite a number of other things with it.   We don't know that it was the thing we focused on doing rather than one of those side things, seemingly irrelevant things, that was the actual difference maker.  We may also do the thing that really mattered in some other context and get results but not know why.   We have relatively little data to draw from and we're making some big leaps .. unwarranted leaps .. based on that data.    ... IMHO of course!  :)

 

I think setting up camp in the hottest spot we know gives us the best chance of other things going right ... if it's as good a spot as we think it is.

 

MIB

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2 hours ago, ShadowBorn said:

My first few sightings have all been at camp. The first sighting was with glow stick hung over a two track six to eight feet in the air. It was baited with can salmon holes poked into it. So it was in a way lured in.  But in my opinion is just setting up camp in a hot zone.  Then wait for what ever may happen. But like we all know it does not happen all the time.

What happened that first time at camp? Did you see the Sasquatch clearly? Or just a shadow? Did it interact with the glow stick or salmon can?

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