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Bigfoot as Carnivore-Blues Washington State


bipedalist
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Blue Mtns Cougar Study = Washington State

 

According to this mountain lion study in Washington state Blue Mountains re: elk calf mortality, there were four unknown carnivore kills (and several lost collars?), wonder what the chances are that our BF friends may have had a role in calf mortality?  Interesting that bear and bobcat were ascribed as culprits too.  We all know historically that BF has been in the Blues.  Discuss but please stay away from the politics of herd management as that is not the intent of the thread. 

 

Feel free to link to other predation by carnivore literature in the Pacific Northwest agencies if you know of any and how it may relate to our elder big hairy brothers.

 

https://www.fieldandstream.com/conservation/cougars-decimate-washington-elk-calves/

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Perhaps, the question has been answered. 

Bears seem more plausible than bobcats. 

We all don't know Large man apes are in the area.

Thanks for sharing. 

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6 hours ago, bipedalist said:

........Discuss but please stay away from the politics of herd management as that is not the intent of the thread. 

 

Feel free to link to other predation by carnivore literature in the Pacific Northwest agencies if you know of any and how it may relate to our elder big hairy brothers.........

 

Actually, game management politics have been the driving force behind ungulate mortality studies. In Alaska, these studies have produced a plethora of game behavior revelations, and I love reading them. In particular, the difference in predation patterns between bears and wolves on moose and caribou are key for me. Bears are the big killers of calves in the spring, and wolves are the primary killers of adult ungulates, primarily in winter when bears are asleep and deep snow gives a pack of wolves the tactical advantage. 

 

Smaller predators like coyotes, lynx, etc take ungulate calves in Alaska, but mortality studies have proven that the overwhelming numbers are taken by bears.

 

Predation by sasquatches is a subject fraught by speculation. There have been many witness reports of sasquatches chasing deer or carrying dead deer, but I think sasquatch/elk interactions are less common. Of all the aspects of sasquatch predation that interests me most, the possibility of sasquatches caching meat (especially for winter) is the most interesting possibility because it could help explain both food availability and the horrible smell associated with sasquatches.

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Well.
 

I’m running a feeding station for Moose, Elk, Deer and Turkeys. It’s a smorgasbord board out there. And I make my rounds hoping to cut some Squatch tracks. Zip, zero, nada. Dunno. I’ve cut some Cougar, Coyote and Bobcat tracks. That’s it. 
 

Either they are not here, not hungry or they hide their tracks well.

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11 hours ago, bipedalist said:

Blue Mtns Cougar Study = Washington State

 

According to this mountain lion study in Washington state Blue Mountains re: elk calf mortality, there were four unknown carnivore kills (and several lost collars?), wonder what the chances are that our BF friends may have had a role in calf mortality?  Interesting that bear and bobcat were ascribed as culprits too.  We all know historically that BF has been in the Blues.  Discuss but please stay away from the politics of herd management as that is not the intent of the thread. 

 

Feel free to link to other predation by carnivore literature in the Pacific Northwest agencies if you know of any and how it may relate to our elder big hairy brothers.

 

https://www.fieldandstream.com/conservation/cougars-decimate-washington-elk-calves/


Agree with the general consensus,  bear is the most likely culprit.   
 

BF are so rare in the US, (IMO), that no one study caught 4 cases of BF predatory nature.     Could be wrong though.   

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Unknown predator simply means the remains were too far decomposed in order to determine a specific predator.

 

Likely not the researchers looking at a dead calf and saying that the claw and/or teeth marks don't match any known predator.

 

Based on previous accounts of Sasquatch and it's ability to detect electronics, I highly doubt one would target an elk calf wearing a collar.  

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