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Risks And Dangers Of The Trade

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Guest LittleFeat

Good one guys, yep, know your gear before you head out.

That was one of the things i forgot to mention was coming across newbs trying to figure out their new walmart or probass gear as its getting dark. Car lights on, the radio or genny going. chatting up a storm that would scare away everything with in 10 miles. Keeping a huge fire going enough to light up their entire camp. Then trying to lure one in with wood knocking and call blasting 10 feet inside the tree line of their brightly lit campsite.

Making noise might actually attract them, but they most likely already know you're there. Once you're settled in at camp(not sleeping), I agree with keeping the fire small, if you must have one. It's going to be hard to see anything in the dark if you've been staring at a fire. You'll be surprised at how well you can see in the dark when there's no light source.

If your that scared of them or the forest in the dark why go out for fudge sakes? :angry:

Just do daytrips, sorry some venting, my bad dry.gif

Fear of the dark is a natural thing, but repeated trips at night without actually staying overnight will most likely ease the fear. Once you've gotten to that point, you can take a stab at an overnight car camping outing. Then if you so desire, up the ante to a short hike (during the day) and set up an overnight camp in a more remote location, yet still fairly close to your vehicle. Acclimation to the dark is the most important thing.

Great points tracker.

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Guest tracker

Hey good word use littlefeat

Acclimation is one of my favorite words. :D

Yea sometimes they will come closer to a discrete fire and a low chatter. The way i figure it is from being in the bush looking in. the bigger the commotion and fire the more people there usually are and higher the risk. But then again i heard two people make as much noise as a platoon. Even researchers keep yapping until they figure something is around. thats if they can hear them over there own chatter. I guess they wait until they smell something or someones doing the zap jig dance. Meanwhile the big buggers been watching for an hour or so waiting for them to quiet down before approaching.

Why not keep it quiet like it's all ready late so they come in sooner?

Ah what do i know anyways, sometimes they will start screaming just to drown out the intruders racket. dry.gif

Edited by tracker

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Guest LittleFeat

I don't like to act like I'm sneaking around, because that could make them a little skittish. I try to keep a set routine so that I become predictable to them. I'm always amazed at how much the woods come alive when the animals get used to seeing me around. That's just what I do though.

Many people swear by other methods, including making a lot of noise or whatever and that's all good, because we all need to try different approaches to understand their behavior. Heck, it's darn near impossible to keep a bunch of friends quiet around a camp fire!

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Guest TooRisky

The first and foremost in my mind is those **** "Pink Monkey's"... Out there poking my nose into all kinds of deep forest area's scouting, I may just stir up some pot growers or worse those **** Meth labs and the zombies that run them... And some ask me why I am armed... LOL

Other than that there is nothing in the forest that I fear, respect greatly yes, but do not fear...

Edited by TooRisky

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MagniAesir

The first and foremost in my mind is those **** "Pink Monkey's"... Out there poking my nose into all kinds of deep forest area's scouting, I may just stir up some pot growers or worse those **** Meth labs and the zombies that run them... And some ask me why I am armed... LOL

Other than that there is nothing in the forest that I fear, respect greatly yes, but do not fear...

This thread shows a lot of undesirable type of things in the PNW

http://www.ifish.net/board/showthread.php?t=148441

very cool read though

Not BF related

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Guest TooRisky

This thread shows a lot of undesirable type of things in the PNW

http://www.ifish.net...ad.php?t=148441

very cool read though

Not BF related

Yeah it is an unfortunate truth that the drug Meth has taken over a lot of lives destroying most of them... They have thought to take old campers out to the woods and make that crap, thinking no one will trip upon them. Now I have not found any active Meth lab camps but have found 2 sites where they were the year before, so it is a real danger and a shame...

Not only do these labs kill people daily with that crap they make, they destroy the environment with the harsh chemicals, and unfortunately they are usually near water so they pollute the lakes and streams also...

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Guest fenris

I don't like to act like I'm sneaking around, because that could make them a little skittish. I try to keep a set routine so that I become predictable to them. I'm always amazed at how much the woods come alive when the animals get used to seeing me around. That's just what I do though.

Many people swear by other methods, including making a lot of noise or whatever and that's all good, because we all need to try different approaches to understand their behavior. Heck, it's darn near impossible to keep a bunch of friends quiet around a camp fire!

In warmer weather I set out the jungle hammock and "hang out" reading a book with music playing but not so loudly, just enough to be heard.

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MagniAesir

I work with some of the chemicals used in making meth, and I can't understand why someone would intentionally put it into their body

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Huntster
BFF Donor
Know who you go out with and the maturity level you can live with in them.

No doubt. I've learned that the hard way. I've been shot twice by hunting partners, and just a bit over a year ago lost a lot of gear in a forest fire started by yet another hunting partner.

I tend to prefer solitude more and more. Even though being by oneself is dangerous, I've found others to be even more dangerous..........

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Guest

Wilderness Medicine Institute offers short-term first aid classes that are very informative. Many factors change when you're an hour away from the nearest help. Don't feel like you need to take a month long Wilderness EMT course, the basic Wilderness First Aid course will prepare you for 95% of the situations we would most like find ourselves (probably closer to 99%).

http://www.nols.edu/wmi/

On another note:

Remember the rule of 3s. 3 hours without shelter (meaning you'll get hypothermic and die if you don't have shelter), 3 days without water (bring a bit of water or a way to sterilize it), 3 weeks without food (meaning, don't worry about bringing food, it's the least of your worries). That's to put things in perspective. You don't need to bring meals into the woods for a day trip. A couple energy bars is probably enough to keep you from "starving" over the period of time you'll be lost.

Leave a note with where you're going

10-essentials (pick what works for you and know how to use it). If you have good gear and know how to use it, trust it. Just because you think you came in one way doesn't mean your compass is wrong. Your compass is right and your gut feeling is wrong. Practice makes perfect. After you're lost is not the time to learn how to use your gear.

If you get lost, stay where you are. Searchers will be looking for a needle in a haystack if you don't leave a note about where you're going. If that needle in the haystack moves around while they're looking for it, or jumps into a different haystack altogether you cripple the searchers chances of finding you. Make it easier for searchers. Don't move around unless there is danger where you are.

Yelling is futile, take a whistle and fire starting material, take bright colored material to tie to a tree branch. Signaling can become key.

Positive attitude

Stay where you are

Shelter

Don't move around

Signal

Stay where you are; make yourself as comfortable as can be, you'll be found in less than 72 hours.

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Huntster
BFF Donor
Remember the rule of 3s. 3 hours without shelter (meaning you'll get hypothermic and die if you don't have shelter), 3 days without water (bring a bit of water or a way to sterilize it), 3 weeks without food (meaning, don't worry about bringing food, it's the least of your worries).

I'd like to add to that:

You can survive:

3 Seconds without Thinking (meaning a wrong decision can kill you in seconds)

3 Hours without Shelter

3 Days without Water

3 Weeks without Food

3 Months without Hope (meaning that after about 3 months without being "saved", many give up hope, and make decisions that cost them their lives).

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Guest

Meth Labs are one thing, but more frequently depending on your climate, marijuana growing operations pose a significant risk as well. Moonshiners used to be the big one... but are much smaller now I think.

For those Squatching near the border... in the Arizona hills, Texas, again a lot of cartel activity.

Tis not the animal activity I generally am concerned with...its the humans!!!

PS: No running with scissors either!

Edited by Squatchdetective

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Bigtex

Great thread and posts here........as a life long hiker, I always tell people the most dangerous thing you will ever do out hiking is your next step! Watch your footing! I fell yesterday, and was extremely lucky I didn't do any serious damage to myself. I was REALLY paying attention too.

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Guest tracker

The 3's rule. I imagine a person would be pretty weak in the third week without food or 3 days without water.

tracker's army survival tips.

Learn whats edible in the woods where you hike, even bugs. For the warmer season deep ventures bring a sheet of thin plastic to catch the morning dew laid out over a hole with a tiny rock in the middle so it will drip into your canteen underneath. That mouth full or two a day will keep you alive. And the sheet will fold up nice into a pocket.

Ok what about tips for when people become scared? They react differently and they forget the basics. Like a 3am visiter thats right outside your tent or something starts hunting or shadowing you? Or the human element, people messing with you or your campsite in the off season? What would you do it may or may not be dangerous, hmm?

Edited by tracker

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