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How Fast Can Bigfoot Run?


Guest Tontar
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Guest BFSleuth

Now you have my dander up to try and find it. Just did a 1.0 search and didn't see anything other than an apparent BF that did figure 8's through two groups of troops on a night training mission. Would love to be able to read that report or listen to the blog radio.

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BFF Patron

Check the revised post..... :keeporder:

Yep, that's the one, speed is implied on follow-up questioning by investigator..... remember this was swampy

slop and not a race track too.

Edited by bipedalist
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Guest BFSleuth

Thanks! Reading the follow up report about the speed as it circled the troops, in the woods, is something to think about.

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Well if a scared or determined black bear can hit 40 mph, let's just say I think a BF could put it too shame and probably run circles around it while it is moving..... this is consistent with a Georgia military unit set of maneuvers when soldiers stated the BF circled them at an un-Godly speed.

Bigfoot or a cheetah, 100 meters, who ya got?

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Guest Figboot

Most reports that stipulate leg observations seem to indicate a proportionally shorter leg length than human males which would affect a high running speed negatively. Add to that their pure bulk weight and the terrain they're running on and I think we have exaggerated speed estimates. Has anyone watched Usain Bolt run in person? The camera doesn't do it justice and human athletes are actually very quick for bipedal mammals. At a guess I still think BF is capable of 30-35mph at short bursts, especially on all fours, but not 40mph plus.

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BFF Patron

Bigfoot or a cheetah, 100 meters, who ya got?

Standing start, BF w/ the BF leaping the cat like a white-tail shot out of a cannon during the win leading to a lane violation and disqualification :o (prepping for the Olympics here).

Edited by bipedalist
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Guest Tontar

I'd put any of my dogs, even my 7 month old puppy, against a BF any day, and put all my money on the start, the peak speeds, and the finish placement.

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  • 1 month later...
Guest BFSleuth

The TBRC is researching Area X. Forum discussion threads:

From the sighting and observations of respected forum members they observed a large and a small BF running up a 30% grade of rocks and vegetation, covering about 50 yards in 3-5 seconds.

Based on this the estimated speed is 20.5 - 34 mph, up a 30% grade. That would equate to the speed of a human sprinter covering 100 yards in as slow as 10 seconds or as fast as 6 seconds... up a very steep hill. A 10 second 100 yard dash is about the same as a good high school sprinter on flat ground. A 6 second 100 yard dash is about 2 seconds faster than the fastest human on flat ground.

So how fast can they run on flat ground? Faster than a bear? The witnesses said bears aren't even in the same league.

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oh my............hikers take heed!!!!!

Oh and they can jump over car hoods!!

Edited by Sunflower
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Guest poignant

Taking the ostrich as the upper limit in non-hopping, known bipedal running speed (65 kmh or 40 mph) and Usain Bolt as the upper limit in human speed (45 kmh or 28 mph).

Guess I'll start with this range then. Bigfoot, 45 - 65 kmh.

As an aside, speed is strongly correlated to the the femur-tibia ratio. A shorter femur allows a shorter stroke and greater stride. Then there's things like potential-kinetic energy being in phase, rebound energy, etc etc.

BFSleuth:

I did the math and here goes.

Assuming, a 200 kg sasquatch running with a 27 m elevation gain in 4 seconds, the amount of power generated is in excess of 13,300 W.

Per mass, elite human athletes generate about 6 W / kg

The beast is generating well over 66 W/kg, making them over ten times stronger than the strongest of us !

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Guest BFSleuth

Your analysis of the power output is interesting, and correlates with the strength of chimpanzees to human. This reminds me of the Bronx zoo test of man vs chimpanzee, pulling a cord to lift a weight. The human athlete managed to pull 200 lbs with one arm. Two chimps were tested at 850 lbs and 1250 lbs.

One other interesting side note of that particular sighting is the observation of how effortless and graceful the movement was, much more fluid than any other wild animal in full flight. This reinforces other witness sighting reports I've read.

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Guest poignant

Ten times the power, without even trying.

Converting to non-metric:

A 440 lb sasquatch running up 89 ft elevation in 4 seconds, generates in excess of 18 HP.

Elite human athletes do about 2 HP in short bursts.

Muscle and skeletal anatomy have a lot to do with why chimps can generate much greater forces, pound for pound. But guess most of us already knew that.

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Guest BFSleuth

A newer theory of why other primates can generate more power than HSS is that for HSS we seem to have "power inhibitors" built into our nervous system, possibly to prevent overloading our more delicate tendon and skeletal structure. This inhibition can be overcome in short bursts from electric shock or adrenaline surge (like women in a state of stress that can lift a car off their husband). It seems that other primates may not have this inhibition in their nervous system and can apply maximum power any time they want.

Any way you slice it, other primates are immensely strong and can perform some amazing leaps and acrobatics. Reports of BF also note some pretty amazing leaps, jumps, and running ability.

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Guest poignant

A newer theory of why other primates can generate more power than HSS is that for HSS we seem to have "power inhibitors" built into our nervous system, possibly to prevent overloading our more delicate tendon and skeletal structure. This inhibition can be overcome in short bursts from electric shock or adrenaline surge (like women in a state of stress that can lift a car off their husband). It seems that other primates may not have this inhibition in their nervous system and can apply maximum power any time they want.

Any way you slice it, other primates are immensely strong and can perform some amazing leaps and acrobatics. Reports of BF also note some pretty amazing leaps, jumps, and running ability.

Agreed. Innervation and neurological control are just one part of the strength equation. I wonder if anyone has come across experiments to stimulate/shock a muscle group into full contraction and measuring the difference in load-liftable.

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