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I believe that if you go into sasquatch habitat with a group of people hoping for contact, make it a group of children. Preferably some very naughty kids. The kind you wouldn’t mind disappearing.

 

Hey, I’m a bear baiter. We think this way. I wouldn’t really do it. Intentionally, any way.

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There seem to be a lot of witness accounts indicating that BF are interested in watching children.    I hope the interest is benign but if not bratty kids would be good bait.    I think the BF that was messing with me at times was an older juvenile.   Throwing stuff at me etc.     In one case it came running up and hit my backpack with something like a small rock.    I whirled around and could not see anything.   I wonder if that is actually encouraged when the adults of the group have assessed you as not being a threat.    If a juvenile learns stealth approach and how to avoid being seen,   that is a good skill set for a species that wishes to stay out of sight.     

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On ‎10‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 9:10 AM, NatFoot said:

Waiting on that novel, hiflier!!

 

:)

 

In the works. Started it a couple of days ago,

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On 10/12/2018 at 12:07 PM, SWWASAS said:

There seem to be a lot of witness accounts indicating that BF are interested in watching children.    I hope the interest is benign but if not bratty kids would be good bait.    I think the BF that was messing with me at times was an older juvenile.   Throwing stuff at me etc.     In one case it came running up and hit my backpack with something like a small rock.    I whirled around and could not see anything.   I wonder if that is actually encouraged when the adults of the group have assessed you as not being a threat.    If a juvenile learns stealth approach and how to avoid being seen,   that is a good skill set for a species that wishes to stay out of sight.     

 

The other explanation is "counting coup" young and old, it is a revered skill or accomplishment.  Not age related. 

 

I was a victim, not a thrown item but a held item touched me or one of them touched me in sneaking in behind.  

 

Sasquatch 1 : Bipedalist 0

 

http://aktalakota.stjo.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=8666

 

Though not in Lakota territory but Cherokee/Shawnee/Catawba interface there is not a direct correlation here. 

 

The best estimate is that it felt like a stick was dragged across the nylon hood I had cinched up over my head that night (could have been fingernails) to protect from mosquitoes which fits with the description of the Plains indian tribes. 

Edited by bipedalist
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Very interesting bipedalist.   .    One can expect that some things observed by BF in the Native American culture may be emulated in the BF culture.     My example of pack contact and another in which a stick/rock glyph was placed on a stump within eyesight of me certainly sounds like "counting Coup" activity.       I disagree with Meldrum about BF having culture.    There is more to culture than baskets and arrowheads.   Activity such as language,  possible oral history,   "counting coup" , making glyphs,  and rock throwing without intent of harm seem to imply a culture and some sort of code of ethics to me.   I think their restraint with humans shows intelligence at work.     The many times I have pestered them but walked away unharmed would not have happened if I had done the same with grizzly bears.     Without restraint on their part, missing humans would trigger massive searches and subsequent retribution should dismembered humans be found.   

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Missing humans? Not true. Read the 411 books....apparently no one cares when the odd person goes missing in our national parks.

 

I have to ask...if they aren't just regular apes/hominids....and they aren't paranormal/ETs....what exactly do we think they are?

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National parks are one thing but we just went through days of search for a missing hiker on Mt Hood who turned dead.     He   got turned around and went up the mountain instead of down when within about 1.5 miles of Timberline Lodge.   

    Dozens of volunteers out every day.    National parks are a small territory compared with the rest of the back country.  Those that do not think the Federal Government covers up just need to look at the difference in searches conducted in National Parks and State Forests.  A few weeks ago a guy was found up near Mt St Helens.    Again it was volunteers and county assets searching.     You are right that the feds do not seem interested in conducting searches.   

 

                                                                                                                                

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25 minutes ago, SWWASAS said:

National parks are one thing but we just went through days of search for a missing hiker on Mt Hood who turned dead.     He   got turned around and went up the mountain instead of down when within about 1.5 miles of Timberline Lodge.   

    Dozens of volunteers out every day.    National parks are a small territory compared with the rest of the back country.  Those that do not think the Federal Government covers up just need to look at the difference in searches conducted in National Parks and State Forests.  A few weeks ago a guy was found up near Mt St Helens.    Again it was volunteers and county assets searching.     You are right that the feds do not seem interested in conducting searches.   

 

                                                                                                                                

 

How do you go UPHILL for rescue on Mt. Hood? Why is that even something someone would contemplate? Its a conical shaped volcano!!!

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Funny but a woman came forward yesterday that got lost in the fog on the same trail same area,  and did the same thing herself.   The trail runs around the mountain, and goes up and down.   She was lost and confused in the fog and had climbed up herself on some branching trail.    The guy had climbed 3000,  completely out of the search area, and another hiker / climber found him rather than the search parties.   He had gotten cold, tried to set up camp,  fell about 30 feet, and died of hypothermia.    The woman got a peek of the lodge through a break in the fog, and realized she was going the wrong way to get there.    She was lucky to get a peek through the fog.  

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2 hours ago, NatFoot said:

I have to ask...if they aren't just regular apes/hominids....and they aren't paranormal/ETs....what exactly do we think they are?

 

I can't tell you what WE think they are because opinions vary a lot.   I think we're dealing with "people", probably not Homo sapiens sapiens, but near enough.   Slightly pre stone age so far as technology only because their physical adaptations relieve the biological pressures that give complex reasoning a survival advantage. 

 

1 hour ago, norseman said:

How do you go UPHILL for rescue on Mt. Hood? Why is that even something someone would contemplate? Its a conical shaped volcano!!!

 

I don't think it is a "contemplate" situation.    I suspect you're looking for rational behavior from people whose capacity for rational choice has been compromised by fear or hypothermia or fatigue and their instinctive reaction, rather than rational ones, are backfiring.

 

Think about the number of people in the Missing 411 books who are found uphill, sometimes WAY uphill, when safety is downhill.   Something IS going on but maybe rather than it being some external entity, maybe we have a shared problem in our lower lizard brain wiring.  Maybe it is something that is survival-positive before birth or slightly after, but after that, becomes a liability.

 

MIB

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You have a good point.   I suspect but cannot prove it without a bunch of interviews that many now assume that by climbing they will get a cell phone signal.     That may be true in some cases but in some areas it does not make any  difference.    I got disoriented one time cross country skiing during a snow storm.     When my tracks in disappeared,  I had to rely on compass readings and a map to find my way out.   Like you said, fear set in, but I had enough experience with a compass to be fairly certain I would find my vehicle.    My navigation was good enough that I came out within several hundred yards of where I parked it.    Fortunately the road was straight and the visibility had improved enough to see the truck.     With cell phone maps, we have a couple of generations now that cannot read a map and don't carry them.   They lose battery charge very fast in GPS mode, just when you need them.    And in big trees prevent GPS  signal too.     I have a Garmin Oregon GPS but stopped carrying the thing because it seemed to cause more problems with navigation than it fixed.    I simply feel more oriented when I use a topo map and compass.    

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One factor with terrain as high as Hood is hypoxia.    Unless you are native to Denver 8000 to 10000 makes most sea level humans at least moderately hypoxic.     I have a female friend who is otherwise healthier than I am and she has nearly passed out on me at 5000.    She has really low blood pressure naturally.    Moderate hypoxia will cloud your mental judgment and makes a lot of people act as if they are drunk.  That throws in illogical behavior.     

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On 10/14/2018 at 2:08 PM, SWWASAS said:

 I simply feel more oriented when I use a topo map and compass.

 

I carry both GPS and map/compass, but for the most part, both are secondary to dead-reckoning.    My chunk of the Cascades is often heavily timbered for miles with no view of the horizon, just a never-ending wall of tree trunks.   That means no opportunity to be sure of where you are.   Without that, finding a direction is only useful for not going in circles, it doesn't help you reach a specific destination.    I've spent a great deal of time with 3-D imagery via Google Earth so that I have a pretty good feel for the lay of the land, at least on a macro scale.   

 

I still find the GPS handy for locating things like trail cameras.    A lot can change in a year, different leaves, different amounts of water in creeks, new blow-down.   

 

MIB

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3 hours ago, MIB said:

 

I carry both GPS and map/compass, but for the most part, both are secondary to dead-reckoning.    My chunk of the Cascades is often heavily timbered for miles with no view of the horizon, just a never-ending wall of tree trunks.   That means no opportunity to be sure of where you are.   Without that, finding a direction is only useful for not going in circles, it doesn't help you reach a specific destination.    I've spent a great deal of time with 3-D imagery via Google Earth so that I have a pretty good feel for the lay of the land, at least on a macro scale.   

 

I still find the GPS handy for locating things like trail cameras.    A lot can change in a year, different leaves, different amounts of water in creeks, new blow-down.   

 

MIB

 

Uh, I beg to differ. If you have ever taken a basic land nav course, you would know that you can reach a specific destination with compass and map.  With a proper compass and a known stride distance you can walk within feet of a specific location.  More accurate than gps. Have you ever heard of Ranger Beads?  I once participated in a course in the military that gave you a map and compass. To pass you had to walk miles through a forest in order to find a field full of pickets. On each one of those pickets was a number. If your navigation with that compas and map took you to the wrong picket...you fail...within meters.

 

Terrain orientation will tell you where you are (if you have a map).  Find your location, shoot an azimuth and walk.  A known starting position and a compass with known or estimated distance of travel ups the likelihood of finding your position and getting you where you need to go.

 

Look, I feel like I am saying this a lot, but I’m sorry If I’m perceived as a jerk. If you are going to be in the field with these things, know your basic field craft. Otherwise, you have zero chance of finding anything, even your own fourth point of contact, google earth will not find it for you. 

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