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Madison5716

Who To Learn From

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Madison5716

I follow a couple dozen bigfooters, well known and unknown but to a few dozen, on YouTube, and I follow links to dozens more (some legit, some bogus). I am gradually putting together a Bigfoot library of interesting books. I have my opinions as experiences, but I crave more information.

 

Which Bigfooters do you like, and why? 

 

Which books are worth reading?

 

Which researchers should be avoided, and why?

 

In the absence of a mentor, who could I learn from? Who have you learned from? 

 

 

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Twist

So little is known of bigfoot I’m often wary of anyone that claims to know for certain anything. 

 

The best people, imo, to learn from are knowledgeable hunters and out doors-man and what I try to take away from them is basic knowledge of the wilderness.  

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Huntster

I would say that reading everything John Green, Grover Krantz, and Jeff Meldrum have written on the subject is the basic foundation. Then study Paul Freeman's activities. 

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norseman

I ignore most conventional wisdom. Tree breaks, whoops, tree knocks, etc.

 

Hunters use three basic methods to lure animals into a ambush. Sex, food or sparring. The basics. Other methods are spot and stalk, hounds and trapping. I think calls targeting food hold great promise.

 

If your hunting Elk during the bugle (breeding season) you can either call like a rival bull looking to steal cows or call like a lovesick cow. Sex and sparring.

 

If your calling in a Bear your using a rabbit in distress call. A promise of a tasty snack of food. Or you could use bait like jelly donuts or zagnut bars.

 

Also mapping out potential black bear food sources may also prove fruitful. And being aware of locations of prior sighting could be too.

 

Lastly I just run substrates that hold tracks. Beaches, muddy roads, crick bottoms, etc.

 

 

 

 

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Arvedis
Posted (edited)

Most of what is out there is wheel spinning. I haven't seen any researchers able to engage quickly enough to learn anything from. Only the hunters seem to be able to do that like area x and the Killing Bigfoot guys. But they don't document often. Check out whatever podcasts from those folks and also the now defunct coonbo and bear exploits. I don't think they are making it all up. There is a reason why all of the above are located in the South and Southwest. They have a nasty BF version that makes it easier to provoke into a response.

 

If anyone else has a high activity area to be part of, see what that is all about. Otherwise you are looking at very little gain for your efforts.

Edited by Arvedis

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norseman
1 hour ago, Arvedis said:

Most of what is out there is wheel spinning. I haven't seen any researchers able to engage quickly enough to learn anything from. Only the hunters seem to be able to do that like area x and the Killing Bigfoot guys. But they don't document often. Check out whatever podcasts from those folks and also the now defunct coonbo and bear exploits. I don't think they are making it all up. There is a reason why all of the above are located in the South and Southwest. They have a nasty BF version that makes it easier to provoke into a response.

 

If anyone else has a high activity area to be part of, see what that is all about. Otherwise you are looking at very little gain for your efforts.

 

Something easy to provoke is easy to shoot.... for example a Grizzly Bear.

 

Years ago it all seemed promising. Now it seems they have the same problem we have? 

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Arvedis
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, norseman said:

 

Something easy to provoke is easy to shoot.... for example a Grizzly Bear.

 

Years ago it all seemed promising. Now it seems they have the same problem we have? 

 

I'm not in the field hunting them so I can't say for certain.  I go by what others report and the highest density that makes it through the "is this worth my time" filter is from the pro kill folks.  I wouldn't even call them groups anymore. Lots of independent operators.  Nothing wildly exotic happens beyond what we already know about.  The only mystery for me lingers from years back by the GCBRO.  Not sure who took the shot but they apparently got some flesh samples from it and had it tested (but did not reveal the method collection or anything else about it).  Mike Wooley said it was "ape" and that is about as scientific as it got.  They have not revealed anything but perhaps there is no data to share. Just another sample leading to nothing.

Edited by Arvedis

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Kiwakwe

I liked Robert Morgan's Bigfoot Observer's Field Manual: A practical and easy-to-follow step-by-step guide to your very own face-to-face encounter with a legend. It lays out a simple, sensible method that I found appealing, probably because it's basically what I do anyway. Guaranteed? Nope, but outside of happenstance it might be the best bet to be out there and quietly, but not obviously, paying attention.

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wiiawiwb

I think there are certain skills sets to be learned.  One would be learning to cast a footprint and being sure you have the materials needed to do so. Another skill set is how to potentially attract a sasquatch. A lot of good stuff above.

 

Another is how to temporarily live in the outdoors whether it is overnight or for an extended period. That involves making and maintaining a camp and thinking about what you'll do for camp security. Finally, learning what you'll do at night if you decide to do night ops. Move about at night or have a predetermined spot that you go to sit and listen.

 

When I first did an expedition, it involved a group of guys. I always felt that I'd get better results with just myself or one or two others. Low profile and low imprint but you can share duties.

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MIB
22 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

I follow a couple dozen bigfooters, well known and unknown but to a few dozen, on YouTube, and I follow links to dozens more (some legit, some bogus). I am gradually putting together a Bigfoot library of interesting books. I have my opinions as experiences, but I crave more information.

 

I don't have much interest in any of the youtube bigfooters EXCEPT a seemingly new guy, howtohunt.com, is putting up some stories that ring as reasonable.

 

22 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

Which Bigfooters do you like, and why? 

 

I am skeptical of all of them for one reason or another.   I think there's something to be learned from most but you have to learn to back-filter their personal biases out to get to the value.   I'm not going to name names, some of the folks are personal friends and I'd have to bash them pretty hard to explain what to take away from each.

 

22 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

Which books are worth reading?

 

I think I can answer that safely.    There are 4 I suggest starting with.  In no particular order,

 

1) The Locals by Thom Powell

2) Enoch by Autumn Williams

3) Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science by Jeff Meldrum

4) Abominable Snowmen: Legend Come to Live by Ivan Sanderson

 

I think understanding each point of view is necessary to understand why we don't have proof yet.   In addition, Sanderson gives a more worldwide view as well as an older view.  

 

Once you're grounded via those 4, then there's a ton more reading to do.  

 

What I do not find useful are more "bigfoot crossed the road ahead of me" accounts.   There is nothing further to learn form those other than building a map of sightings in time / space to perhaps help focus on locations that increase the probability of having a (or another) sighting.

 

22 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

Which researchers should be avoided, and why?

 

The hoaxers on the sasquatch detective hall of shame.   I would avoid anyone making absolute statements about what they are sure of.  I would watch out for anyone posing as a sasquatch authority.  

 

22 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

In the absence of a mentor, who could I learn from? Who have you learned from?

 

I learned much from my research partner of past days .. who will remain nameless.    I question much of what I learned .. needs to be verified and has not been.    I think that's a solid theme.   Get the ideas others are willing to share but don't accept them without doing your own verification.   Too many people want to be spoon fed ... they need to examine what's in the spoon when that happens.    Rather than looking to someone else for your truth, find others willing to go in search of truth with you.    Have not met you or Northwind but I believe that working together you are potentially ahead of the talking heads you are looking for.   Have faith in yourself / yourselves.  In the end, as I found with my research partner, I'm all I've truly got, the rest is fleeting.

 

MIB

 

 

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Arvedis
12 minutes ago, MIB said:

 Enoch by Autumn Williams

 

I wouldn't have expected that to make the list. So much controversy!:superstition:

 

I don't think it was ever fully vetted if the "novel" reflected actual knowledge or if it was intended as fiction from whatever source. We know that Thom Powell's The Locals is based on actual events. Maybe not to the letter but based on what went down in Honobia at some point.

 

Not so sure the full scale of Enoch can hold up to scrutiny. But it would be a good thing if investigation could reveal more clues one way or the other. Unfortunately, Autumn Williams does not appear active in Bigfootery any longer. Hopefully, criticism of her book did not drive her away, or contribute to that decision.

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hiflier
Posted (edited)

GOTTA toss John Green's "Sasquatch: The Apes Among Us" into the mix. A must read.

 

May as well quite shamelessly add my own book in there too: "The Sasquatch Hunter's Field Manual". Only available through myself. PM me if interested.

Edited by hiflier
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The Truth
On 7/2/2019 at 2:28 PM, Madison5716 said:

I follow a couple dozen bigfooters, well known and unknown but to a few dozen, on YouTube, and I follow links to dozens more (some legit, some bogus). I am gradually putting together a Bigfoot library of interesting books. I have my opinions as experiences, but I crave more information.

 

Which Bigfooters do you like, and why? 

 

Which books are worth reading?

 

Which researchers should be avoided, and why?

 

In the absence of a mentor, who could I learn from? Who have you learned from? 

 

 

Answers to your questions in order:
Which Bigfooters do you like, and why? 

John Green, Rene Daninden (deceased), Derek Randles, Tyler Huggins, Charlie Raymond, Thomas Steenburg, Cliff Barackman because they are all level headed and objective. 

 

Which books are worth reading?

Sasquatch the Apes Among Us (Green), Big Footprints (Krantz), Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science (Meldrum)

 

Which researchers should be avoided, and why?

Matthew Johnson: seems like he makes things up and may be delusional

Mike Paterson (aka Sasquatch Ontario): he's getting hoaxed by the cottage owner but won't accept it and he's for sure delusional

Scott Carpenter: suffers from pareidolia

Timbergiant Bigfoot: same as Johnson and Carpenter

Tim Fasano: delusional

Tom Biscardi: a known hoaxer

 

In the absence of a mentor, who could I learn from? Who have you learned from? 

From reading books and watching old documentaries you can learn a lot. My list of bigfooters I like answers who I've learned from. 

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

What a great selection of answers. Thank you, everyone!

 

Yeah, boots on the ground - getting out there with NorthWind and his friend - is truly the best learning curve there is. Nevertheless, it helps to know WHAT you're looking FOR, else you're just wandering in the forest (itself a fine goal, and a favorite). 

 

A next step I'd like to take would be short overnight expeditions with nearby researchers, other folks who regularly get OUT there. Get their views, exchange information. There's two I'd like to talk with and pick their brains, one near Portland and one in NorCal. I'd also love to find something awesome and invite Ciff down to check it out and hear his thoughts (I don't think I made it thru an episode of Finding Bigfoot, lol, but the guy is interesting). NorthWind and I got to hear him speak earlier this year, and it was good stuff. I'm supposed to be meeting up with Autumn Williams for coffee, she's local, but our schedules haven't worked out.

 

I hate summer, and my truck is dead, so I'm looking for quality time fillers! Need to order some books, looks like. I have the Meldrum book and the Robert Morgan book. Both are excellent.

Edited by Madison5716
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Huntster
19 minutes ago, Madison5716 said:

..........Yeah, boots on the ground - getting out there with NorthWind and his friend - is truly the best learning curve there is. Nevertheless, it helps to know WHAT you're looking FOR, else you're just wandering in the forest (itself a fine goal, and a favorite)........

 

I consider Paul Freeman to be the best sasquatch tracker in modern times. Why? 

 

* He focused on one area. Granted, he was an outdoor worker in that area, so he was essentially paid to be there, but the point is that (unlike so many before and after him) he didn't run all around the PNW from Alaska to Los Angeles chasing reports. He knew these things lived in the Blue Mountains, and that's where he focused.

* He kept records and found patterns. His map of footprints, dates, and directions is an excellent example. In the end, this work led him to a quality sighting and filming.

* His focus and persistence led him to a quality sighting and filming. How many people can claim that? Even Patterson and Gimlin were looked at suspiciously by many in the area as lucky cowboys to have come there from Washington and gotten the film. Not Freeman. he knew where to be and when, and it paid off.

* Even Meldrum was suspiciously surprised when he stopped to meet Freeman unexpectedly and was brought out to see fresh prints that Freeman had found that very morning. Freeman found prints regularly. He was good at it.

* The last Freeman interview is telling. He pretty much said that he really didn't care what others said and thought about him. He was in it simply for the thrill of seeing these creatures, and he didn't care if the pointy heads ever accepted their existence.

* All told, Paul Freeman claimed four sightings and countless footprint finds

 

 

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