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norseman

Cooking in the field

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norseman

 

I have used a Dutch oven a lot in the woods. I also have a wood stove oven for a wall tent. And a cast iron hibachi grill too. Good stuff!

 

One of my favorites was BBQ Elk ribs in the Dutch oven.

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

You might like this guy. His outdoor cooking channel is amazing! Almazan Kitchen. It's food Porn at it's best!

 

 

Edited by Madison5716
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SWWASAS
On 7/12/2019 at 9:05 AM, norseman said:

 

I have used a Dutch oven a lot in the woods. I also have a wood stove oven for a wall tent. And a cast iron hibachi grill too. Good stuff!

 

One of my favorites was BBQ Elk ribs in the Dutch oven.

Speaking of elk I went to Ft Klatsup National Monument with relatives a couple of days ago.   They said that the Lewis and Clark expedition shot 120 some elk during their winter there.   That works out to be 8 lbs of elk a day per person.   Elk are still very common in the area.   

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norseman

Probably minus guts, head, legs, hide, etc? 4-5 lbs?

 

Very interesting!

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JKH
Posted (edited)

Surely mostly killed for hides in that time period, side benefit of the most amazing meat.

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norseman
8 minutes ago, JKH said:

Surely mostly killed for hides in that time period, side benefit of the most amazing meat.

 

It’s good stuff!

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norseman

 

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

I love elk jerky. It's the best!

 

I love mushrooms sauteed in butter with a bit of garlic and a lot of bacon. It's 100x better outdoors than inside. Add coffee and it's my favorite camping breakfast!

 

I've also just bought the Uberleben twig stove and that's fun to cook on! Gotta keep feeding the fire, but that's easy, and fun.

 

 

Edited by Madison5716
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7.62

Great stuff 

I'm addicted to Dutch oven cooking and never go car camping without mine . 

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NorthWind

I prefer moose or even bison to elk meat, but I'm not too picky. 

 

Had these recently with dinner. Grew these pearl oyster mushrooms myself. I love learning how to do new things.

 

20190605_185530-1_resized.thumb.jpg.e066cb330517996e3780ac626f2cda1a.jpg

 

Dutch oven cooking is something I would like to learn one of these days, too. 

 

And I would like to build a cedar strip canoe.

 

 

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

Oh next time we go out in n the woods, let's do it up! Make a day camp, cook some food and let the bigfoots find us instead of hiking all over the forest looking for them! As long as we can keep the cougar and the bears away. Those 50 bear poop piles might deter me a bit, but what about setting up right off the road? You know where I'm thinking! We could even stay until twilight, with just enough light to get off the mountain before full dark. That would be fun! Let's do it!  I'm a good camp cook and I have lots of cast iron cookware.. I got my ghost meter back from Tobe yesterday at Strangebrau, so we can play with that, too. Oh, and I recorded some Thom Powell and Ron Morehead for you to hear. Fun!

Edited by Madison5716
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NorthWind

Awesome, sounds good! Bears will be smelling bacon!

 

 

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MIB

IMHO cooking in the field has to be broken into 2 types.    First is car camping and camping with pack stock, second is backpacking.      There isn't much you can do at home that you can't do car camping with a bit of planning.   Backpacking is a whole different story.   Good luck lugging that dutch oven on your back.   Or food that has to stay refrigerated.   One plus to winter backpacking is you can carry some fresh food that wouldn't be ok in summer.   

 

MIB

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norseman
On 7/16/2019 at 7:30 AM, MIB said:

IMHO cooking in the field has to be broken into 2 types.    First is car camping and camping with pack stock, second is backpacking.      There isn't much you can do at home that you can't do car camping with a bit of planning.   Backpacking is a whole different story.   Good luck lugging that dutch oven on your back.   Or food that has to stay refrigerated.   One plus to winter backpacking is you can carry some fresh food that wouldn't be ok in summer.   

 

MIB

 

There are short cuts if you are willing to try.

 

A hot flat rock or a bed of coals can take the place of a Dutch oven fer meat. Canned meat will keep indefinitely as well. So will smoked meats. Or pack a weapon and create yer own supply of fresh meat. Grouse are like the most quick and easy Pac NW meat source there is. Start a fire and rotisserie with green sticks. Mtn men packed a small cast iron fry pan and got by. I would not suggest buying and using aluminum cook ware to save weight.

 

Ive done the REI style modern back packer route. Backpacker gas stove, and freeze dried pouches. Mountain house, backpacker pantry, etc. It’s ok in a pinch but I personally prefer cooking over an open fire.

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NorthWind

Lots of grouse here in Oregon, that's for sure, and I have a name for 'em..."Themsgoodeatin"

 

Up in Canada we used to just hit them with the truck while driving and step out and collect up dinner. Not the smartest things in the woods, but boy, can they give you a scare when you flush 'em when you are not expecting it. But roast grouse with some good wild mushrooms and perhaps a little wine in the sauce is top notch mealtime. I'll take those over nasty fish like salmon or trout any day. Wild mushrooms are also easy to pack around as they can be dried and weigh almost nothing.

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