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Do any of you camp out in potential hot spots?...


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hiflier
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I think the interesting keyword here is "potential" which leaves an awful lot of room for answering the question with "yes."

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On 8/7/2020 at 2:59 PM, hiflier said:

I think the interesting keyword here is "potential" which leaves an awful lot of room for answering the question with "yes."

 

Good point.   It might be telling to reword the question ... do you deliberately camp where you expect to have "activity?"

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hiflier
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Yes, exactly. Maine is low on sightings but I camp on the easternmost coast not far from the report years ago regarding the Meddybemps Howler http://www.bigfootencounters.com/stories/meddybemps.htm. Where I camp is also located in a state park across a main road from a large wildlife refuge so I ALWAYS go prepared for the unexpected. Starting this Thursday I will be there for two weeks. 

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wiiawiwb
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I have a half dozen places I go to but there are two I would consider my current hot spots.  One of the is very creepy and both of my fellow sasquatching friends who've stayed there with me feel the same. I can't put my finger on it always but it feels like something is watching you. Always. I'm always on high alert when in this area.

 

I know two people who have had a sighting/encounter in this area.  Both were with another person when it happened. I wasn't with them but have known them long enough to believe what they say.  One was so scared by the incident he stayed out of the woods for several years. I no longer see either of them because one movd to another region of the country while the other moved abroad.

 

I'm planning to go there in the next week or two with a buddy and poke around several other ponds a mile or so beyond this one. We'll return and stay overnight at the creepy place.

 

If you want to have a sighting or encounter, you have to put yourself in the place(s) you think give you the best opportunity for one.

 

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There is nowhere within probably 200 miles of me that doesn't have SOME possibility of bigfoot, often low, but never zero.    For me, there's a difference between camping where a thing might happen and picking a place to camp in hopes something will happen.     I seek out places where things seemingly are most likely to happen.    It can be a bit scary but nothing ventured, nothing gained.    Hopefully in time, something ventured, connection made.    There is a time to take off my researcher hat and become an experiencer, a participant.

 

MIB

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georgerm

A couple of weeks ago, I camped out under the stars in a turn of the century hot spot. It was discovered by several miners who hiked into this remote canyon in pursuit of gold during the 1800s. The spot is up the Sixes River in southern Oregon where the south fork branches off. The night I camped out was quite calm with no bigfoot screams. This area would be worthwhile to explore by hiking about 10 miles into a roadless area where the miners dug tunnels. One miner was killed by a bigfoot that scared the rest of miners back to the town of Port Orford.

 

Below is my sighting prior to 1980 near Crater Lake, Oregon, while sleeping under the stars.

 

 

sketch_2_bigfoot_001.thumb.jpg.6eef239d9a0094ca200ee9bc113e6a1e.jpg. This report is in the early history of Coos County. A group of hardy tough hikers could access this area while I maintain a base camp with good communications since being over 70, puts me out of rugged hikes.

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A juvy in your opinion?

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wiiawiwb
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On 7/24/2020 at 8:19 PM, MIB said:

 

No experience at all.  :)   :)   :)  

 

My favorite area requires backpacking in.   I've done it as a round trip day hike but it's pretty brutal.    Climb 1700 feet in 3.5 miles, then back down 500 feet in a mile.   Trail is pretty rough, big loose rocks,  some places stairsteps in the rocks, plus it traps runoff so it continually gets carved deeper.    There is another way in, not as steep, but a mile farther and more exposure to direct sun .. hotter.   

 

There is no chicken out option.   If you're not well on your way back to the trailhead 2 hours before dark, you are committed to staying.   The trail is bad enough that a twisted or even broken ankle in the dark is a real good possibility.   If you buy the ticket, you have to ride the train.   I've had two fairly terrifying experiences in there.   We had bipedal visitors the very first night I was ever there, at least 3 of them, and I got introduced to infrasound.   It sucks.   And the last night I spent there, last summer, started pretty cool with an hour or so of light wood knocks coming from 30 feet or so away in the dark while I laid in my sleeping bag and bivy.   It stopped being cool when "whatever it was" decided to leave.   It was the most chilling, "alien", crazy sound I've heard in over 50 years in the woods.   I thought I knew what was knocking, now I'm not sure.    7-1/2 miles back to the trailhead, in the dark, on a barely maintained trail .. nope, the die was cast, we had to stay and ride it out.   Fortunately nothing further happened.

 

MIB

 

 

What a great location and quite the harrowing adventure. Do you ever see other hikers or backpackers around when hiking into your location?

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I see a lot of people in there up 'til mid summer, then slowly fewer.   By the time the BFs arrive, there might be 1-2 small groups of swimmers day-hiking in, maybe a local couple camping at one of the 5 central lakes, but it's no surprise not to see anyone else, too.   The BFs generally seem to show up near the last week of August.   People are gone at the end of Labor Day weekend.   There's a small overlap but not much.  

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1 hour ago, MIB said:

I see a lot of people in there up 'til mid summer, then slowly fewer.   By the time the BFs arrive, there might be 1-2 small groups of swimmers day-hiking in, maybe a local couple camping at one of the 5 central lakes, but it's no surprise not to see anyone else, too.   The BFs generally seem to show up near the last week of August.   People are gone at the end of Labor Day weekend.   There's a small overlap but not much.  

 

Have you told the second story before? I'd like to read/hear more.

 

Honestly, not sure if I have the stones for what you described that far out.

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georgerm
21 hours ago, NatFoot said:

A juvy in your opinion?

 

 

The head was large and cone shaped and may have been a young adult male wondering what we were doing in his territory. I had no fear since bigfoot had only been lightly  reported in the news paper at the time before the Patterson event happened so I passed it off as fiction. This creature had me puzzled for years since the visual image remained clear. I passed it off as a bear until several years passed when my sighting began to fit the bigfoot description. When I learned about reports of solo campers  that may have been hauled off for the dinner of a starving old bigfoot, I felt lucky. The second I looked away to wake up Bill, the creature vanished. The Bauman report of a Canadian that was kidnapped by a male bigfoot is an example.  

 

When it began to stare at me, I'm still puzzled as to what caused me to wake from a sound sleep only to find my self staring at some motionless creature that had it eyes on me. I suppose this would be telepathic communication caused by staring. Many of us have sensed someone staring at us when we turn to make eye contact or visa versa. It has been reported that bigfoot freezes when a person glances at it and then it ducks down when the person looks away. The bigfoot must watch eye movement and knows when to move and hide when a human is glancing around the area

 

 

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3 hours ago, NatFoot said:

Have you told the second story before? I'd like to read/hear more.

 

Which?   I mean, I think so, but maybe in another thread?  

 

3 hours ago, NatFoot said:

Honestly, not sure if I have the stones for what you described that far out.

 

Once you're out there, 5 miles or more from the truck, and it's getting dark, you're committed.   Not a question of "stones" anymore.   The dangers walking out in the dark are greater than the dangers staying put.   Gotta suck it up and hang on for daylight.    Many of my overnighters out there are with a good friend who introduced me to the area.   That makes it a lot better.   This year's trip will likely include his son.   You can read a little about one of their experiences in BFRO report 24892 .. this is the father and son from that report.    That was before I knew them.  

 

I won't lie, some nights I wonder (real hard) if I've made the wrong choice, but so far I've made it back.   

 

MIB

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@MIB

 

That story didn't have you leaned up against a boulder all night with a revolver in hand and brief sightings, right?

 

Sounds similar to that story.

 

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wiiawiwb
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It's interesting how, in some cases, people have sightings or encounters very close to their vehicle. They never ventured into the woods more than 100 yards. I know people who have been successful having such experiences and prefer to choose locations that are remote yet accessible by vehicle. I've been with them a half dozen times before and they choose their locations carefully and do night ops away from camp. 

 

My preference is to get far away from vehicles which should decrease the likelihood of human interference. It does complicates thing because it limits what you can have access to as you have to carry it in.  As MIB mentioned, being 5 miles from your vehicle changes the dynamic as hoofing back to the car at night can be long and treacherous.  In some cases, it's just not doable given the condition of the hike and the obstacles one must traverse to get there.

 

My friends, who chose to do vehicle-access expeditions, have had several sightings/encounters and I'm still waiting for my first. I still prefer to put myself out there away from humanity as I think it provides the best odds of having a sighting or encounter. That said, it's difficult to argue with their success.

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