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Skinwalker13
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On 4/23/2021 at 8:02 AM, NatFoot said:

 

I'm at decent elevation in the area and I'm not sure there was too much freeze damage from what I can tell.

 

Hope your site faired the same.

 

It was bizarre though!

 

Also snowed heavy yesterday - big flakes but was melting as soon as it hit the ground. Was very pretty.

Yeah it was the same here, after talking to the land owner they didnt have any freeze warnings or frost on the ground in the mornings the days I was worried about. With any luck the berries will do much better this year than last. That late freeze in 2019 in central WV wiped out most of the berries that year and last year was in recovery. Fingers crossed for a good year this year were going to try and get out there at the peak.

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Skinwalker13
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As we usually try to do with all our fieldwork results, we took this year's casts in for peer review and had several researchers including cliff barrakman and Tom Shay take a look and get their opinions. The general consensus on the 2 tracks is that they are infact genuine and copies have been requested for their own collections and to be sent to Meldurm.

received_938312863581656.jpeg

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BlackRockBigfoot
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48 minutes ago, Skinwalker13 said:

As we usually try to do with all our fieldwork results, we took this year's casts in for peer review and had several researchers including cliff barrakman and Tom Shay take a look and get their opinions. The general consensus on the 2 tracks is that they are infact genuine and copies have been requested for their own collections and to be sent to Meldurm.

received_938312863581656.jpeg

That’s an awesome cast.

 

Great job!

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Believer57
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@Skinwalker13

 

Are there 5 or 6 toes on that foot?

 

I saw on a 2020 documentary on Southern Sasquatches (Texas to Florida) that when the population is thin, it leads to inbreeding which can cause the number of toes to change. Any thoughts?

 

Cheers!

 

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Skinwalker13
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@Believer57There were only 5 toes, the outside edge along the edge of the foot is over pour. If you scroll back a page or 2 you'll see the outline I made on one of the other images.

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ShadowBorn
Moderator
On 5/4/2021 at 2:34 PM, Skinwalker13 said:

As we usually try to do with all our fieldwork results, we took this year's casts in for peer review and had several researchers including cliff barrakman and Tom Shay take a look and get their opinions. The general consensus on the 2 tracks is that they are infact genuine and copies have been requested for their own collections and to be sent to Meldurm.

received_938312863581656.jpeg

You can see some bone structure in that track.  Kind of seems like this creature did not have any padding on it's foot. Those toe's are very spayed out and that's where you can start to see that boney feature of this track. Was this the only track or were there a line of tracks. Is there more pictures . @skinwalker13 You have always come through with some great evidence. Keep up the great work out in the field and stay safe.

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Skinwalker13
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@ShadowBorn thanks! 

If you go back a page theres a video that has the other tracks in it briefly. They were in an area where new grass was being sown so there was a thick layer of hay down. My research partner Ron took photos of them but they are really nondescript in 2d format. The first track was just the edge of a foot and the 2 outer toes, second track was the one we cast, then 4 more that went through the hay and back into the forest. Our assumption was that it came down to grab some ground cherries. Several were missing from one area and the vines were all there, right along the track way. 

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WSA
Posted (edited)

Question: What you describe as ground cherries ...are you referring to the small, low growing  yellow-orange fruit I see in the video? That looks like a plant we see over in the fields in the Shenandoah Valley...not sure what you call it...not the Chinese lantern-type fruit thingy.  Trying to research the other one.

Edited by WSA
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Skinwalker13
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On 5/8/2021 at 8:55 AM, WSA said:

Question: What you describe as ground cherries ...are you referring to the small, low growing  yellow-orange fruit I see in the video? That looks like a plant we see over in the fields in the Shenandoah Valley...not sure what you call it...not the Chinese lantern-type fruit thingy.  Trying to research the other one.

Yes! Those are called ground cherries. The are great for jam, jellies, tarts, and wine making. Also a valuable source of nearly year round occuring natural sugars. 

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I had a vague idea that they were in the nightshade family...which tomatoes are too, of course...and that might have sent me down a path of confusion about them. I suppose the little lantern shroud falls off of them late in the season. Thanks for the clarification. You see these a lot in fields that have been cut over or hayed.  

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