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Thermal a game changer for finding Sasquatch


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Anyone seen the new "bfro" brand thermal that they are getting ready to release? It's price tag is $995 supposed to be on par with the $1800-2000 market thermals. He's suposed to be posting actual video of it soon. The big perk ive seen on the specks is that its Bluetooth and can send a feed out to multiple screens while recording.

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3 hours ago, Skinwalker13 said:

Anyone seen the new "bfro" brand thermal that they are getting ready to release? It's price tag is $995 supposed to be on par with the $1800-2000 market thermals. He's suposed to be posting actual video of it soon. The big perk ive seen on the specks is that its Bluetooth and can send a feed out to multiple screens while recording.

I haven’t seen anything on this.  
 

I wonder who it is manufactured by.

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28 minutes ago, BlackRockBigfoot said:

I haven’t seen anything on this.  
 

I wonder who it is manufactured by.

 

Looks like it's a independent guy who used to work for flir or worked very closely with flir. Guy lives in ohio.

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29 minutes ago, BlackRockBigfoot said:

I haven’t seen anything on this.  
 

I wonder who it is manufactured by.

 

Quote
A brilliant BFRO organizer in Ohio has met the challenge to design a high resolution recording thermal camera that costs under $1000. That’s an important threshold for affordability.
The cheapest thermal imagers cost $600, but the resolution of those units is 160 lines. The video quality is so poor that a person standing 100 feet away is just a blob of heat that could be a tree stump.
The better thermal cameras usually cost much more money. The most comparable FLIR unit list price is over $2000. This BFRO-branded thermal camera is BETTER (especially for Bigfoot research use) than a $2,000 FLIR.
The BFRO scope has 384 lines of resolution compared to FLIR’s 320 lines of resolution (FLIR Scout III 320). It also has impressive zoom for a thermal camera (4x).
The BFRO scope also streams live thermal video to multiple nearby smartphones, so everyone around a campfire, or sitting in a car, can view and record the live stream on their own phones.
You can also set it on a vehicle roof so people in nearby tents (20 foot range) can watch and record on their phones while in their sleeping bags ... for several hours.
I tested it and I will post some footage soon, as soon as I can record some horses at night. Horses are excellent test subjects for thermal imagers needing to be tuned to mammal temps in the cool night, because of the wide temperature gradients on their large surfaces
Damon Pfeifer in Ohio had a batch of these scopes custom made in Taiwan with the latest chip hardware (Taiwan leads the world in chip technology nowadays). He’s got a limited number of them, but there are many people who were waiting for a high quality thermal scope to fall below the $1,000 threshold. He sells the scopes for $995. If you are interested in one, please email the BFRO: ContactUs@BFRO.net
If you wonder why people would pay $1,000 for a good thermal scope, it’s not because they expect to immediately film a Bigfoot. It’s because it opens up a whole new world — the world of the woods at night. You will feel ten times braver in the woods in the dark if you have a scope like this. It’s more comforting than a gun because you can spot and identify any type of animal that’s moving toward you in the dark, even animals behind bushes. You go from being terrified of brush crunching animal sounds, to actually seeking out those sounds in a dark forest. It’s a completely different experience.
Once you take a walk at night in the dark with a good thermal scope ... you will feel naked without one. You will never want to walk in dark woods again without it.

^ from Matt Moneymaker on Facebook

1878704727_BFROThermal.thumb.jpg.92c1686c801e8914810ba6aeece10444.jpg

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That looks similar to an AGM 384.  The controls are a bit different.  I wonder if they had the chips and some of the components made in the same factory?

 

Anyway…anything to get more tools into more hands is a plus.  Eager to hear how well these things work.

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The more people can use a thermal, the more enjoyment they'll have, and the more results we should see. I'll be looking for three things from the soon-to-be-released thermal imager:

 

1) Does it have a germanium lens and what size is it. This is often the single most expensive component of a thermal imager.

2) What is the thermal sensor? Amongst other things this tells us the pixel size.

3) What is the native resolution. For me, this may be the most important.

 

I can understand how a cottage-industry company, with no or low advertising costs, can undercut a monolithic company. Cut the fat and give the savings to the consumer.  When a company decides to cut into the muscle too, then all bets are off for me.

 

Here's a thermal imager from a company in the UK. Pretty good specs and roughly $1,650 in US dollars. How does one cut 40% from the price of this thermal one to arrive at a $995 price point of the BFRO unit?

 

https://www.nightvisionstore.co.uk/ward-wt35-thermal-imager-monocular-c2x33812480

 

Edited by wiiawiwb
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