Jump to content

Book Reviews: Barton Nunnelly Trilogy


VAfooter
 Share

Recommended Posts

Admin

OK, not really a trilogy in fact, but three books by Bart that all relate to the same subject matter....

 

1. Mysterious Kentucky, Vol 1: The History, Mystery and Unexplained of the Bluegrass State

 

Published in 2007, with two updates, this short book (less than 250 pages) provides a very interesting overview of weird creatures in Kentucky. Starting out with gigantic skeletons found, moving across the spectrum of water, sky, and land creatures, and finishing with Edgar Cayce, the book jumps into the mysteries of Kentucky with both feet. The biggest section of the book is reserved for Bigfoot and like creatures. There is a lot of information on the author's experiences during his childhood and as an adult. There are several cases provided that comes from the Kentucky Bigfoot site that Bart runs. While there a number of cases presented that I am familiar with, there were a large number that I had not heard before. He did include Jan Thompson's accounts of Dogman and the LBL incident. From UFOs to water monsters to little people to MIB to Bigfoot/Dogmen, this book has it all. Interesting stuff and well worth your time if you like this type of material.

 

 

2. Mysterious Kentucky, Vol 2: The Dark and Bloody Ground

 

Published in 2007, with one update, this short book (less than 350 pages) provides more companion material to Volume 1. This is in essence, an expanded version of the first volume. There is some overlap between the two, but this one has more and new accounts of weird stuff in Kentucky. Organized much like Volume 1, this book also delves into some hauntings and paranormal activities as well. Much of what I said for Volume 1 applies to this book as well. Mr. Nunnelly has lived a far more exciting life than I, for which I am very grateful! Another great book if this sort of stuff is your cup of tea.

 

 

3.The Inhumanoids: Real Encounters with Beings that can't Exist!

 

Published in 2011, with one update, this book runs almost 450 pages. Bart covers the spectrum and history of upright, bipedal (mostly) beings from Fairies to Giants to the Demonic, from the beginning of time to the present, and from around the world. Much of the material covered is hard to believe being that it is so incredible. Even if you do not find it believable, you will find it captivating reading. Again, there is some overlap with the first two books, but not overly so. The author definitely provides more of his own personal thoughts on the nature of these beings than in Volumes 1 and 2. Of special note, there is a good chapter on MIB and their ilk. All in all, a handy reference guide to weird, upright creatures from around the world. At the end, he pulls it all together and provides an encompassing explanation that you may or may not agree with. Nick Redfern and Linda Godfrey provide the Introductions.

 

 

There is a moderate amount of "woo" in these books, especially in The Inhumanoids, which is to be expected when dealing with this subject matter. One interesting case in Volume 1, which seems to have some similarity with the Maine incident located elsewhere on this site, indicates a car accident involving BF. The single occupant of the car was fatally injured and nearby residents saw that officials were preventing public access to the site, officials burying something beside the road, and washing down the road to clean off the blood. This occurred in Hart County and was described in The Locals by Thom Powell. In Volume 2, Bart relates a story from a witness that pushes the credibility line, at least for me. However, if it were true, it would explain much about BF which is currently a mystery. It deals with a young boy who was sort of "adopted", for lack of a better word, by a clan of  BF and over time came to know their ways. Not sure I buy into it, but it clears up some of the fog surrounding the topic if you do.

 

 

Pros:

 

Very interesting accounts of Kentucky weirdness

Written in a manner that will keep you turning pages.

Locations are provided for most of the accounts

Lots of reports never told before as far as I know

 

 

Cons (mostly minor nits):

 

Fair amount of duplicate information across all three books

Some editing errors, but nothing too serious

No references and source material for the most part

No TOC for The Inhumanoids

Pictures and images not in color

 

Bottom line:

 

Vols 1 and 2 are a must have if you have any interest at all in crypto creatures of KY. Inhumanoids is a great handbook and reference for a quick history and summary of upright creatures through out the ages. Bart has me convinced that if you go to Henderson County, KY, to look for cyptids, you will most likely find them.

 

All three books are Highly Recommended!

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Kentucky-Vol-Unexplained-Bluegrass/dp/154308754X/ref=sr_1_3?crid=21VI0PCJK0B6N&keywords=nunnelly&qid=1640023788&sprefix=nunnelly%2Caps%2C54&sr=8-3

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Kentucky-Vol-Bloody-Ground/dp/1544115180/ref=sr_1_1?crid=21VI0PCJK0B6N&keywords=nunnelly&qid=1640023788&sprefix=nunnelly%2Caps%2C54&sr=8-1

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Inhumanoids-Real-Encounters-Beings-Exist/dp/1545451745/ref=sr_1_2?crid=21VI0PCJK0B6N&keywords=nunnelly&qid=1640023788&sprefix=nunnelly%2Caps%2C54&sr=8-2

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, VAfooter said:

OK, not really a trilogy in fact, but three books by Bart that all relate to the same subject matter....

 

1. Mysterious Kentucky, Vol 1: The History, Mystery and Unexplained of the Bluegrass State

 

Published in 2007, with two updates, this short book (less than 250 pages) provides a very interesting overview of weird creatures in Kentucky. Starting out with gigantic skeletons found, moving across the spectrum of water, sky, and land creatures, and finishing with Edgar Cayce, the book jumps into the mysteries of Kentucky with both feet. The biggest section of the book is reserved for Bigfoot and like creatures. There is a lot of information on the author's experiences during his childhood and as an adult. There are several cases provided that comes from the Kentucky Bigfoot site that Bart runs. While there a number of cases presented that I am familiar with, there were a large number that I had not heard before. He did include Jan Thompson's accounts of Dogman and the LBL incident. From UFOs to water monsters to little people to MIB to Bigfoot/Dogmen, this book has it all. Interesting stuff and well worth your time if you like this type of material.

 

 

2. Mysterious Kentucky, Vol 2: The Dark and Bloody Ground

 

Published in 2007, with one update, this short book (less than 350 pages) provides more companion material to Volume 1. This is in essence, an expanded version of the first volume. There is some overlap between the two, but this one has more and new accounts of weird stuff in Kentucky. Organized much like Volume 1, this book also delves into some hauntings and paranormal activities as well. Much of what I said for Volume 1 applies to this book as well. Mr. Nunnelly has lived a far more exciting life than I, for which I am very grateful! Another great book if this sort of stuff is your cup of tea.

 

 

3.The Inhumanoids: Real Encounters with Beings that can't Exist!

 

Published in 2011, with one update, this book runs almost 450 pages. Bart covers the spectrum and history of upright, bipedal (mostly) beings from Fairies to Giants to the Demonic, from the beginning of time to the present, and from around the world. Much of the material covered is hard to believe being that it is so incredible. Even if you do not find it believable, you will find it captivating reading. Again, there is some overlap with the first two books, but not overly so. The author definitely provides more of his own personal thoughts on the nature of these beings than in Volumes 1 and 2. Of special note, there is a good chapter on MIB and their ilk. All in all, a handy reference guide to weird, upright creatures from around the world. At the end, he pulls it all together and provides an encompassing explanation that you may or may not agree with. Nick Redfern and Linda Godfrey provide the Introductions.

 

 

There is a moderate amount of "woo" in these books, especially in The Inhumanoids, which is to be expected when dealing with this subject matter. One interesting case in Volume 1, which seems to have some similarity with the Maine incident located elsewhere on this site, indicates a car accident involving BF. The single occupant of the car was fatally injured and nearby residents saw that officials were preventing public access to the site, officials burying something beside the road, and washing down the road to clean off the blood. This occurred in Hart County and was described in The Locals by Thom Powell. In Volume 2, Bart relates a story from a witness that pushes the credibility line, at least for me. However, if it were true, it would explain much about BF which is currently a mystery. It deals with a young boy who was sort of "adopted", for lack of a better word, by a clan of  BF and over time came to know their ways. Not sure I buy into it, but it clears up some of the fog surrounding the topic if you do.

 

 

Pros:

 

Very interesting accounts of Kentucky weirdness

Written in a manner that will keep you turning pages.

Locations are provided for most of the accounts

Lots of reports never told before as far as I know

 

 

Cons (mostly minor nits):

 

Fair amount of duplicate information across all three books

Some editing errors, but nothing too serious

No references and source material for the most part

No TOC for The Inhumanoids

Pictures and images not in color

 

Bottom line:

 

Vols 1 and 2 are a must have if you have any interest at all in crypto creatures of KY. Inhumanoids is a great handbook and reference for a quick history and summary of upright creatures through out the ages. Bart has me convinced that if you go to Henderson County, KY, to look for cyptids, you will most likely find them.

 

All three books are Highly Recommended!

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Kentucky-Vol-Unexplained-Bluegrass/dp/154308754X/ref=sr_1_3?crid=21VI0PCJK0B6N&keywords=nunnelly&qid=1640023788&sprefix=nunnelly%2Caps%2C54&sr=8-3

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Kentucky-Vol-Bloody-Ground/dp/1544115180/ref=sr_1_1?crid=21VI0PCJK0B6N&keywords=nunnelly&qid=1640023788&sprefix=nunnelly%2Caps%2C54&sr=8-1

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Inhumanoids-Real-Encounters-Beings-Exist/dp/1545451745/ref=sr_1_2?crid=21VI0PCJK0B6N&keywords=nunnelly&qid=1640023788&sprefix=nunnelly%2Caps%2C54&sr=8-2

Barton is a great man, a great author, and a great researcher.  His accounts of growing up in the area of the Spottsville Monster are riveting.  He has been a great source of information on strange phenomena in that part of the country, and he is always glad to lend his expertise when asked.  
 

The Inhumanoids is experiencing a bit of a resurgence right now, which is great since Barton is being introduced to a whole new generation of people.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Admin
33 minutes ago, BlackRockBigfoot said:

Barton is a great man, a great author, and a great researcher.

 

Yes he is. He is probably the biggest expert (if there is such a thing) on the Beast of LBL. And from what I can gather, he believes Roger's account totally, which to me, says a lot. The Inhumanoids is excellent, but also some very creepy stuff. It could possibly change one's view of the world and what is "real" and what is not.

 

Like I said, he has lived a life that is much more exciting than mine. And I do not mind a bit. No way I would have wanted to share some of his experiences.

 

I should have mentioned that I read the paper book versions and not the Kindle e-books.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, VAfooter said:

 

Yes he is. He is probably the biggest expert (if there is such a thing) on the Beast of LBL. And from what I can gather, he believes Roger's account totally, which to me, says a lot. The Inhumanoids is excellent, but also some very creepy stuff. It could possibly change one's view of the world and what is "real" and what is not.

 

Like I said, he has lived a life that is much more exciting than mine. And I do not mind a bit. No way I would have wanted to share some of his experiences.

 

I should have mentioned that I read the paper book versions and not the Kindle e-books.

He and I are of different opinions on some of this stuff, but even given his experience he will always approach different opinions respectfully and with an open mind.  
 

I don’t have anything but nice things to say about Barton.  
 

I haven’t heard about what his current views on Roger are or if those views have changed over time.  
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Admin

From what I know, he pretty much thinks that Roger's account is spot on. Or at least as far as anyone who was not there can tell. Bart believes that Roger is telling the truth and that his account is the definitive one. I do not think that his attitude towards Roger has changed since all of this came out this spring. I do think he has had a number of private conversations with Roger and therefore probably knows some stuff that is not yet public, if it ever will be. At least that is what I have picked up from a few PRT shows  with him that I have heard.

 

Anyway these are good books to have if you are interested in this sort of stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...