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  1. BlackRockBigfoot

    BlackRockBigfoot

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  2. Incorrigible1

    Incorrigible1

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  3. wiiawiwb

    wiiawiwb

    Sésquac


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  4. PBeaton

    PBeaton

    Passionate Member


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/06/2020 in Posts

  1. 5 points
    The woods are VAST...and even people who hike them often are only seeing a tiny part of the area. Look a map of a good sized national forest. Established trails barely scratch the surface of the area. And the vast majority of people never get off the trail, let alone traverse the first natural barrier like a steep climb in elevation or water crossing. I get this all of the time. People tell me that they are in the Cataloochee area all of the time and that it is impossible that these creatures exist there because they would have seen them by now. They count pulling over on a paved road to look at the reintroduced elk as being intimately familiar with the entire region.
  2. 4 points
    We have a few contacts, and are always making more. I have business cards I hand out. I also sometimes (not too often) get leads from the YouTube Channel (and some of those folks are just flat out crazy anyway). And when I run into someone at a gas station or supermarket or wherever I am, I talk to people about it. They know me as the crazy bigfoot guy, but they always remember me, and oftentimes later will relay stories they or their friends or family had. There are other methods I use as well. Google Earth is very helpful in locating possible spots. But I am not an expert by any means. And sometimes it seems like I am trying to find patterns where there are no patterns to be found. @Madison5716 has a few contacts, too, and sometimes we go with those reports. It's all really, really fun. I have another idea for locating spots that I want to try out, but I don't care to elaborate on that right now..it may not work at all. I haven't tried it yet. And sometimes we just go explore. But I would say that 99% of the stories I hear from people were never reported to LE or the BFRO because I do ask them. If you are looking for "unreported reports", my suggestion would be to talk to people. Get a BF t-shirt or two. A sticker on your rig, maybe. People will comment on them. Bam. Converstation started. And then there are leads like the one MIB just posted. LOL, thanks, @MIB!
  3. 3 points
    @BlackRockBigfoot and @ShadowBorn i appreciate both of your POVs here. Text format can be a pain to "read in to" and is often misinterpreted. So no harm no foul on SBs end, again thanks for the input. As for the ridges, I'm going to try amd get better images, of the toe area. The smaller rock that was captured in the track 100% forced the toes to dig that deep from the step off. It measures at 11in with the ridge of the foot bent downward and toes curled, with that in mind the foot was likely 12-13in in real life. so its small for a alledged sasquatch but ive found 10-11in tracks before in this area previously. The likelyhood of someone being barefoot in the area is pretty low, as its a pretty good bit off any trails and out a creek a little ways but I cant rule out the possibility. I always err on the side of casting everything if for no other reason than to keep your skills up to snuff. Ill post up close shots of the toes shortly.
  4. 3 points
    Date & Time - Sunday, August 9, 2920, 10am - 6pm or so Location - Oregon Cascades Weather - Fantastic, 75-80°F, sunny What Happened- NorthWind and I drove around an area where we had a tip but found nothing, so we started exploring interesting features on our map. Drove a lot of new-to-us roads in the middle of nowhere. No bigfoots today, just fun in beautiful Oregon! The little lake where we ate lunch and I fished a bit. A rosd we walked down, which led to the view point. The waterfall. Maybe 20 feet tall? I climbed to the top falls, but couldn't get further. The view looking southeast. Diamond Peak is just north of this, and there's another peak to the south. The view looking northeast. There are three volcanic peaks in the distance.
  5. 3 points
    I'd bet that 98%+ of people who venture into the forest never leave the trail. I go off trail all the time and never see anyone nor any indications someone came through. Why would they? You'll see a hunter during hunting season and someone into birding. Hikers stay on the trail and backpackers generally tend to hike to a lean-to or an allowable or prescribed tent area. I've seen avid fishermen go back to secluded ponds to fish but that's pretty much it. Look at Maine. It is 90% forested, which the highest percent of any state. It has 17 million acres of forest with a population of 1.4 million people. I think a sasquatch could find lots of space to enjoy itself without ever being noticed.
  6. 3 points
    My father is like that. He claims they can't exist because he hasn't seen one (*). While he truly is surrounded by National Forest land on all sides, and he is in a good spot, aside from a couple days a year in deer season, he doesn't go into the woods. He takes pride in killing his deer the first time he goes out and ridicules others (like me) who take longer as "wasting time". Despite all of the potential, he doesn't actually have the exposure he thinks he does. It has proven impossible to get him to see that. (*) He does have a story ... he told me of seeing something that looked just like a sasquatch would look "if they existed." (truly, what do you do with that level of deliberate blindness?) Knowing him as I do, I guarantee if they were proved to exist tomorrow, he'd be an expert, has known about them all his life. Some people .. y' just gotta give up on. 'til 2 years ago, I had never seen a marten. I caught one on trail camera about 3-4 years ago, and possibly another. Then one day I saw two, separately, over a mile apart. It's just a matter of being in the right place at the right time. Sometimes the odds of that are not what we expect them to be. MIB
  7. 2 points
    Cannot explain wiiawb (any hint on what this handle means) experience but a twisted tree broken off 6 feet off the ground can be explained. Imagine a big wind tearing through the canopy creating a pushing force on the top of the tree. You would think at some point it would just push it over but what if the tree had deep well anchored roots in a dry ground. If he force is strong enough something will eventually give. If it is not the ground then it will be the trees flex point which would explain the break 5-10 ft off the ground. Now imagine if the flex point, which is getting the brunt of the force, has an uneven density or perhaps an old limb so it is not evenly strong. The weaker side would break first and the tree would twist in to the break creating a twisted tree broken 6-10 ft off the ground.
  8. 2 points
    Skeptics wonder how BF could be there in any numbers but not be seen in the forests. Those that know the history of World War II know that a German Army infiltrated the Ardens Forest in great numbers including dozens of tanks without being detected by the Allies before the Germans launched into what became the Battle of the Bulge. Madisons forest pictures could literally be hiding an army of BF.
  9. 2 points
    These are neat options. Thank you all for the links and information. The only concern I have, is that this is like getting a little pregnant with going the RV route. The features these campers provide have so many gadgets, electronics, kitchen sink and even toilet that they are like a mini RV. Too complex and too much maintenance for just going out camping (for now, maybe later I will bite). I recall that one of the BFRO trip leaders in CA bought one of these (I think from the company that MIB posted) and put it on a Tacoma. He told me that he will never camp in a tent again after he was touched by a BF through the tent wall. That really freaked him out and he felt safer inside a hard shell camper at night. Everybody has their own personal rationale to make this investment.
  10. 2 points
    I've seen videos of the young lady who uses that camper. She's a very interesting person.
  11. 2 points
    Took my future son n law Bear hunting today. Saw one smallish one. Huckleberries and salmon berries are ripe! Cool only 55 degrees.
  12. 2 points
    I am a member of the Taxidermy.net forum and there is a film company that is doing a documentary on Ken Walker, who is a world famous taxidermist, bigfoot enthusiast and one time member on here. It is about him, sasquatch and the sasquatch reproduction he made for the World Taxidermy Show a year or two ago. It looks interesting. It's called Big Fur and will be offered in many forms on it's website. Just thought it might interest some over here.
  13. 2 points
    I was mushroom hunting a couple of years ago in an area that was pretty remote. Single muddy road into the area about two miles off the "main" gravel road and 15 miles from the nearest town. I drove down the muddy road to where it dead-ended at a nice little clearing that someone had camped in a few times; campfire spot built and some leftover firewood. I parked there, then started searching up the draw that was heavily wooded and contained a little creek. I was all alone, except for my great dane/lab mix and there were no trails, other than game trails. I'd been there about 45 minutes, my eyes glued to the ground looking for Morel mushrooms when I got the sense that something was watching me. My dog also seemed to be looking into the brush, but didn't growl. I was so convinced I was being watched that I actually took pictures of the dense brush where my dog was looking just in case... I searched an area of about 50 yards wide along the small stream and went up in the dense woods about 500 yards. About 15 minutes after feeling like I was being watched, I was along the stream bed and spotted a boot print in the mud along the stream. It was a smaller print from a hiking boot and was super fresh. Like within 20 minutes fresh with water still seeping into it. The direction of travel indicated the person had come from the ridge top, down into the draw where I was searching for mushroom, then crossed the stream and back up the other side of the draw, all while I was less than 200 yards away and never heard or saw them. It was weird to encounter someone that far into the woods, with no trails or roads, that was completely off-trail, and able to elude my detection. But, apparently my dog was aware of them, but he was a big friendly guy and rarely ever barked at anyone.
  14. 2 points
    Do women have more BF encounters? If so, I am breaking out the Chanel #5. I am sure @Madison5716 wouldn't mind if I wore that in her little truck. LOL
  15. 2 points
    I could not agree more. When I hear about expeditions covering an area. I Just think about the vast coverings the dark forests contain. I hike ,camp and fish in such areas. I have no idea what dwells there Unequivocalby. I like to explore and travel off the beaten path. I see lots of interesting life. Unfortunately no man apes. Just because I don't see them or believe in them does not mean that I am correct.
  16. 2 points
    Some more pics. Sorry for the typos above. Posting from my phone. Hopefully this give some perspective on how dense MI forests can be.
  17. 2 points
    Took a trip theu Wisconsin and up thru the MI UP these past few days. No BF activity but wasn’t really looking for it either. all of these pics are from the UP of MI.
  18. 2 points
    No experience at all. My favorite area requires backpacking in. I've done it as a round trip day hike but it's pretty brutal. Climb 1700 feet in 3.5 miles, then back down 500 feet in a mile. Trail is pretty rough, big loose rocks, some places stairsteps in the rocks, plus it traps runoff so it continually gets carved deeper. There is another way in, not as steep, but a mile farther and more exposure to direct sun .. hotter. There is no chicken out option. If you're not well on your way back to the trailhead 2 hours before dark, you are committed to staying. The trail is bad enough that a twisted or even broken ankle in the dark is a real good possibility. If you buy the ticket, you have to ride the train. I've had two fairly terrifying experiences in there. We had bipedal visitors the very first night I was ever there, at least 3 of them, and I got introduced to infrasound. It sucks. And the last night I spent there, last summer, started pretty cool with an hour or so of light wood knocks coming from 30 feet or so away in the dark while I laid in my sleeping bag and bivy. It stopped being cool when "whatever it was" decided to leave. It was the most chilling, "alien", crazy sound I've heard in over 50 years in the woods. I thought I knew what was knocking, now I'm not sure. 7-1/2 miles back to the trailhead, in the dark, on a barely maintained trail .. nope, the die was cast, we had to stay and ride it out. Fortunately nothing further happened. MIB
  19. 1 point
    Yeah, I keep forgetting the suppliers are disrupted as well. I do think things will get better eventually. My biggest fear is that somewhere around 3 November things will really hit the skids. And that is as far as I am going with that line of discussion, anything further will have to be in the Tar Pit. So in my mind, I am looking at a deadline of late October or very early November. Not to mention that I have heard from different sources that when PSA announces new stock, they sell out within 30 minutes or so. I suspect this is the case with most other dealers as well, especially for lower priced items. Even Gun Broker does not seem to have as much stock recently as they used to have, say 2-3 years ago.
  20. 1 point
    Two things. One is that huge market. Lot of people who never have owned guns are buying guns because of the political situation ... Antifa, BLM, riots, etc., plus COVID, fear of people looting to steal food. My daughter and her BF bought pistol when I was down visiting them ... never had the slightest interest before. There are many many MANY thousands like them. Second is COVID, not merely fear driving the market, but also requirements placed on the arms manufacturers for distance between employees which is impossible to do with their current production lines. In other words, wildy increased demand combined with reduced supply. Some personal data points. There's rifle I want. The company is out of upstate New York with their sales crew in Montana and a new plant in Alabama. All were shut down because the New York facility was shut down for COVID-19 (state mandate) and it supplies parts for guns assembled in all of their plants. Now they're up and running but with a huge backlog of orders. I'm in line to get my rifle some time in November or early December. :( Another ... as the COVID-19 stuff was starting but hadn't gone full panic, I bought a new .22 target pistol. Same background check as any other firearm. That day I was 42nd in line and my background check (NICS ... FBI data) was finished in 40 minutes. About 3 weeks ago I bought a rifle. There were 4200-odd people in line ahead of me. They told me the "instant" checks were taking 7-10 days. I was lucky, I guess, I only had to wait for 5 days for an "instant" check to finish. Those data points demonstrate the incredibly high level of demand along with the reduced level of supply. That's just the guns. Go try to find ammo. Bwah hah hah ... it's bad. But it's not just guns and ammo. Try to buy camping gear. Tents. Backpacks. Sleeping bags. Or a canoe or kayak. One of the local stores has taken out a number of shelf units and moved the remaining ones farther apart so it doesn't look so empty. Think I know where those $600/week unemployment payments are going ... straight to anything even vaguely "survivalist-y". Don't panic, stay the course. One of these days, the credit card, etc bills are going to come due and those people who bought and hoarded thinking they'd make a windfall profit are going to have to start selling at a loss rather than for the vast profit they imagined. MIB
  21. 1 point
    Alaska is definitely the land of bears, all three North American species. I couldn't possibly even remember how many black and brown bears I've seen in 44 years here, but I've never seen a polar bear in the wild (I avoid the Arctic Ocean coastal plain, because it's just not my cup of tea up there). I kicked up two grizzlies at close range less than two months ago, and I'm going bear hunting again tomorrow for 4 days. But despite that, I can't seem to get a shot at a mature brown bear boar during an open season in an open area. They are legally well protected. In that same time I've seen two wolverines and two martens, but not once in Alaska seen anything that I could call a sasquatch footprint, and this is a land of mud well conducive for leaving prints. I can only surmise that they don't exist in southcentral Alaska, unless at extremely low densities in the most remote coastal areas. Even then, with the amount of snow along the coast here, they would almost certainly have to hibernate like bears due to the absolute dearth of food for months. Southeast Alaska is very different than up here, though, and at the extreme southern end of the Alexander Archipelago there are no brown bears to compete with or protect from as well. And, sure enough, that's where Alaskan reports and tradition are highest.
  22. 1 point
    "Avid hunter" here, for going on 60 years, though I don't hunt as much now, as all my old buddies have either given it up due to health, or passed on. :-( In that time, I've seen 5 cougar/puma/mtn lions, 5 grizzlies, 1 pine marten, 0 wolverine, and 1 Sasquatch. That kind of puts their rarity in perspective for me.
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    I can easily create an upward movement of air ( reverse call blasting ). No foo-foo.
  25. 1 point
    Pretty expensive stuff, NorthWind. It may be not be necessary unless Bigfoot has an unusual olfactory palette in which case it would only respond to top shelf fragrances. HOWEVER! A female may view it as a threat to her designs on a nice hunky Bigfoot male so she may not take too kindly to someone stepping into her territory wearing one of the best flowery smellers money can buy. So if you're gonna get pummeled, I'd definitely go with the cheap stuff.....uh.....again....except for in Madison's truck.
  26. 1 point
    A Dakota fire pit should resolve the smoke issue. Easy to make. Many of videos show two very large holes. When I've done it in the past, I make them much smaller. I didn't want to give away my location, so the fire was small for that reason. In the past few years, I want a sasquatch to find me so I want it so see the smoke wafting through the trees.
  27. 1 point
    While in campsite research mode, use campfire smoke to signal human presence. I use propane for cooking and build a small fire ( when allowed ). I build '360 degree fires'.............wherever I sit, the smoke follows me so I should have a good pattern of olfactory signaling. Humans have been watching fires since we saw lightning hit trees. We watch fire and they watch us watching fire. I do not call blast or wood knock. Just basic air guitar.
  28. 1 point
    Is that Hills Creek Reservoir in the background? Up that direction, go up Larison Creek (south west near the dam on Hills Creek) and head for the 5850 road. Somewhere up there, you can look sorta north or northwest and there's a couple caves or overhangs visible near a ridge top. (I was only there once, more or less lost ... "you're not lost unless you're out of gas and lost" ... so it's a little vague.) If you get farther up that road, you come to Noonday Saddle. Off to the left, back down towards the Middle Fork, there's a craggy knob down in the center of a hole. That one intrigues me for no apparent reason. I think it is called Bearbones Mtn but that's a guess.
  29. 1 point
    In a remote area I can hear a vehicle approaching from several miles away on rough logging roads. . If I can, so can BF, especially if you have narrowed down an active area and drive into it to park. When my research area was active, I had the feeling I was being watched nearly all the time. A couple of times when I slammed the drivers door to hike, I could hear a responding wood knock. The door apparently signaled them I was there. It was not trail head that was used by anyone else. Of course in other areas where I never found any indication of activity, I rarely had the feeling I was being watched. Not sure if that was a chicken and egg relationship or not. Certainly after a footprint find, I expect BF to be in the area watching me. My first footprint find was so fresh that I must have nearly seen the BF that made it. Little bits of rock were falling of the edges of the print. I have wondered how close the BF was and if it was watching me. I played the trumpet as a young person but fell and knocked out my front teeth, ending my trumpet playing career. I wish I could go out and do that now.
  30. 1 point
    I stand corrected, thank you!
  31. 1 point
    They could run their own web site on their own server using apache and save big. I have always had a problem with BRFO charging people to go on their expeditions with out providing meals as host to these expeditions. They have turned bigfooting into a enterprise. Who is to say that some of the things that happen on these expeditions may not be man made to further the income of future expeditions. I do not want to get into say that they might be hoaxing. Since I know by hearing others speak highly about how they teach those who go on these expeditions the fundamentals of bigfooting. As well as I see this as a baby sitting service to those who have maybe never stepped into the woods. Maybe for those who should have no business being out there in the first place. As far as the BFRO as a whole they are a great place who started the this research in the first place. They have one of the biggest data resources available on the internet. Historical data base of known sightings. where we all can go and look up up known sightings in different parts of the states. If MM did create this to be an enterprise then he did a great job and kudo's to him for doing what he did. It must have taken allot of team work to put this together. So to being a pioneer on the internet in setting up such a project as this . We should all be greatfull for being the first in this field. Not just anyone can come up with such an idea as this in that era. A big Kudo's.
  32. 1 point
    August 1 - We also found another toilet.
  33. 1 point
    Date & Time - Saturday, August 1, 2020 from 10am - 7pm Location - Willamette National Forest, Diamond Peak Wilderness Weather - 90°F, pretty but hot What Happened- NorthWind and I followed up on a report given to him. We went to the location, poked around a bit, but didn't find anything so we just went exploring in the area. Found an overlook and wow, it was amazing! Here's Diamond Peak. Here's the amazing view! I think it was almost 6k feet.
  34. 1 point
    Oof. We need to up our game. "Join our professional outings in search of Earth's most mysterious creature! Each guide is a certified member of the worldrenowned BFF! Please make sure to visit our mobile gift shop at the conclusion of your trip!"
  35. 1 point
    That might be me. My plan, next time I get "pushed", if there is a next time, is to just sit down. From sitting, you can neither attack nor flee, so you reduce the appearance of threat and you demonstrate willingness / capacity to manage your fear. Both of those indicate lower risk to the BF. Realistically, you're not going to outrun them if they decide you're prey, you'll just die tired. Seems to me you might as well try to play the cards some other way. MIB
  36. 1 point
    If there are permits that should be secured and aren't, shame on them, but that's a completely different issue. The same goes for a curfew. These are micro-issues which don't detract from the overarching idea that the BFRO provides an opportunity for someone to get out on an actual BF expedition. I'm confident that no promises are made that definitive results will occur on the expedition. People pay exorbitant prices for all sorts of entertainment. SuperBowl tickets, hot air-balloon rides, and many others come to mind. In the hunting world, people incur enormous costs (in the 5-figures?) to go on a guided brown-bear hunt on Kodiak Island. I'm confident no guide service guarantees a brown bear will be had at the end of the hunt yet people spend oodles of dollars for the opportunity to go on such a hunt. A sasquatch expedition is a hunt of another type except it might cost the $500 fee plus some new clothing and equipment (tent). Minuscule by comparison. I think all of this is great. It gets people out in the outdoors, gets them into a new world called sasquatching, and everyone has a good time. As I said before, it's a win-win arrangement that everyone gladly enters into.
  37. 1 point
    Man the amount of times they banned me from there ! lol
  38. 1 point
    Um, those are found in the Paranormal section. Bigfoot whisperers. Or not. YMMV
  39. 1 point
  40. 1 point
    Let's say someone has developed an interest in sasquatching. They see things on TV and want to participate but, never having led an outdoor life, they ask themselves -- where do I start? None of my friends of family are believers. I think a BFRO expedition would be an awesome way to segue into that world. How is it any different than paying a photographer to teach you how to use a manual camera, a ski instructor showing you how to downhill ski, an artist teaching how to paint, or even an attorney for advice? We all have to begin somewhere and if no one in your life has any experience with sasquatching, you pay for it. I call that a smart thing to do. People have to recognize, and accept, that they don't know what they don't know. If it's a painting, and you do it on your own and fail, you've wasted some materials. If you venture into the woods, trying to be emulate the bigfooting you saw on TV, and fail, you could end up on the ugly side of a SAR rescue. In the end, they may develop friendships which allow them to go sasquatching again and again as a member of BFRO or a local group of similarly-interested people. Friendships develop and flourish. That, to me, is a very small deposit to make for a large payoff in the future.
  41. 1 point
    Everytime there are gun pics on the front page slider, our traffic goes down... here is WV, a stream by Black Water Falls, the water actually looks black but it's the tannic acid from the trees that turns the water dark.
  42. 1 point
    That makes no sense unless they thought that bigfoot research included shooting BF. Just the concept that guns are only for hunting is not constitutional. Someone should have explained to the AST that the constitution supports gun ownership to protect citizens against a stupid overreaching government.
  43. 1 point
    Wow, I'd say you are amply protected. What a great collection. Kudos. I really like the customized coating on the slide of your Glock 29(SF?). Very nice. I find that I can't bring a long gun with me because they don't backpack easily or comfortably. If only I had the Wild West Guns Co-Pilot things might change!! https://www.wildwestguns.com/custom-guns/ak-co-pilot/
  44. 1 point
    I've been in LE for about 14 years now and I've never had any "training" in how to deal with BF reports. My co-workers that know about my interests think I'm crazy and that I might as well be out looking for Spider-man. It's a fictional character, nothing more. There is a retired Alaska State Trooper who was (is?) a BFRO investigator and got into before he retired from AST. I've heard other troopers say "His cheese slipped off his cracker." When referring to his interest in BF. It is NOT taken seriously by LE here.
  45. 1 point
    I'm going on a short 2-day tent camping trip in Idaho with my girlfriend next week in a pretty remote area. Our main focus will be on taking the UTV on some trips to huckleberry patches and digging for garnets. Lots of bears in the area and a few wolves. Not going to be a "Bigfoot Expedition" per se. I don't have a thermal camera, or even a video camera with night vision, yet, so not sure how effective we would be going out at night. But at least we will be out in the wilderness and aware of our surroundings and looking for evidence. Better than nothing, I suppose. Area we'll be in:
  46. 1 point
    Sounds like a plan NW.........hey gigantor, hope you are safe & well,! These woods around here, like most places, turn into something different at night, lotta stuff I wouldn't want her messing with, other wolves, packs of Coyotes, hogs, maybe even a hungry hairyman, can't take a chance of loosing my best gal:)
  47. 1 point
    A great example of boots to the ground research. Without testing the water, assumptions can be made. It is the minerals in the water. Depending on location, artesian water can pack a lot of electrolytes. More assumptions: Sasquatch use the artesian water to buffer their blood pH to alkaline and 'normal' mid range and try to avoid acidic pH. Other animals are fond of mineral licks. No jokes about Olympia beer and Artesians allowed in this thread.
  48. 1 point
    Still pretty hot & dry....hope you guys aren't sick of seeing the Sotol snacks, but the easiest way to follow the Hairyman's movements this time of year, plus they are eating it pretty good. First pick shows one of their trails, and the discarded Sotol leaves as they drop them along the way.....Hansel & Gretel dropped bread crumbs, the Hairyman drops Sotol leaves, in the South anyway:)
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    Before the publicly available low cost FLIR, people such as Michael Green of Squeaky fame used to use Aiptek video cams hooked/wired to small thermal devices set to record movement detection (which the old aipteks allowed), quite sure that is how he captured the Squeaky thermal video in the back of a mini-van set up with open hatch as he departed the campsite in a false camp-type scenario. I have not investigated thermal movement options to trigger recording but sounds like something to pursue especially on a multinight hotspot. Great pictures Explorer, and good luck in the pursuit. It never ceases to amaze me the extent of beetle damage in the west it is quite disheartening and I am battling similar invasive pests in the east attacking our Eastern and Carolina Hemlocks.
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