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  1. A body part will suffice.
    6 points
  2. So, last summer I had some personal business in NW Ohio and used Cambridge, OH as a stopover point, which is the closest town to Salt Fork State Park. I summarized my field trip findings and posted some interesting pics in a prior post linked here: Salt Fork Summer '22 Trip Summary . I made the same trip a few weeks ago in mid-January. Originally was going to do an dusk/evening hike but arrived later than expected and it was pitch black, freezing, and wet. I geared up appropriately and put on a headlamp, but decided the better part of valor was discretion and just tooled around a bit at the beginning of the Morgan's Knob Trail (the pine forest part, if anyone's been to it before). I then left the trail and drove off the beaten path on some of the gravel roads in the park to see if I might get lucky with a sighting, but no dice. Absolutely beautiful stargazing, though. The next day in the late morning I made it out for some hiking. I went to check out the area where I'd seen what I suspected was a tree structure on my prior trip and was pleased to see it was still there, unchanged (pics 2 and 3 below). More interesting than that, though, was the trio of pushed-over trees I noticed on my hike out to the tree structure (pic 1 below). They looked a bit odd b/c no other trees around them were pushed over or had fallen over, and it seemed the three were intentionally pushed over in the same direction. Not sure it's significant, but it did look interesting, and I'm curious to know what others think. Anyway, after my hike, I did a few more short walks, and then drove in a loop on some of the gravel roads in the park. Came upon a pickup truck with some bigfoot stickers on it, and stopped to have a nice chat with a fellow 'squatcher named Wayne who had driven down from PA. I gave him some tips on the known hotspots in the park, and we showed each other photos of tree structures we both had come across. His was from North Georgia and wasn't too different in appearance (kind of an asterisk shape) in the one I'd found at Salt Fork. I'd heard on a recent Bigfoot Eyewitness Radio podcast that the asterisk-shaped structures supposedly commemorate a birth.
    4 points
  3. That I have. I would take a photo of you to prove it but no one would believe me. I'd cast your boot print but that wouldn't be proof either. A recording of you speaking? Nope, not good enough. Forum members are just going to have to take my word for it that you are real. Others may have seen you and may have even filed reports but there claims would just be stories. And, for the record, I wouldn't dare try to take a hair sample. You have disappeared almost before my very eyes at times, however, so I can't rule out that you may be interdimensional and use portals. All in all? I am a Kiwakwe proponent in that I'm convinced you exist, proving it to others though?
    4 points
  4. In hindsight here i should have overlayed the swings, apologies. I'm swamped with work right now so don't have the time i'm afraid but you should get the jist here. Not the biggest of dataset by any stretch but just about big enough to give a possible insight in to the seasonality of reports in the Ozarks, from East to West. For clarity of East/West, see below. ===== 'Eastern Ozarks' are all reports within the counties of : Crawford Laclede Maries Miller Washington Carter Dent Douglas Howell Oregon Ozark Phelps Pulaski Ripley Shannon Texas Wright Butler Iron Madison Reynolds St. Francois Ste. Genevieve Wayne ===== 'Western Ozarks' are all reports within the counties of : Barry Barton Camden Cedar Christian Dade Dallas Greene Hickory Jasper Lawrence McDonald Newton Polk St. Clair Stone Taney Vernon Webster ===== There is a singular chart/graphic here and hopefully two animated gifs with the east > west seasonal overlays. I created this for a research group down there that were working the area, good people.
    3 points
  5. It has parents? There goes my spore theory.
    2 points
  6. 2 points
  7. And how would you know who is a fraud and who isn't?
    2 points
  8. Of the top of my head for those that I'm most familiar with? Olympic Project et al, NAWAC et al, members Norseman, wiiawiwb, MIB, BC Witness BlackRockBigfoot, Madison, NorthWind, Kiwakwe, along with several others. I also know many personally that are not members of the BFF who I've either contacted or are associated with: a LEO and a former LEO, a couple of biologists, a microbiologist, a chemist involved in DNA, a primatologist, and someone deeply involved with hair morphology with respect to DNA, and various fields of academia. I've also emailed and got responses from experts in osteology (bones) as well as the former head of the University of California system's citizen science e-DNA collection program. This isn't to say that all are proponents but the reception across the board has never been negative, and my outreach over the past 6 years includes many more.
    2 points
  9. That is something I would greatly look forward to, sir. And I couldn't be more in agreement that the data "could" be correct, and I am indeed inclined to think that it is. But I also agree that, since Dr. Hart is not the source of the data, it can present a limiting level of scientific confidence. I thank you for your patience with me and I will wait to see if your and Dr. Hart's work can further support Table 22 in the future. If it can be, then hopefully, with so much riding on the outcome, it will be accepted by professional and citizen scientists alike- whether they be Sasquatch proponents or not. I also think it was important for the Forum and its members to see this discussion and, for that reason, I am grateful our your dialogue. It's all good.
    2 points
  10. The hibernation question brings up the extremes of their reported habitat. The farther north and away from tidewater you go, the more hibernation is required. Even if we accept meat caching for winter like modern man (circa 4500 years ago to today), that would mean a semi-hibernation existence in the far north interiors. Not so the coastline. The sea provides year round sustenance.
    2 points
  11. Personal opinion here from a city slicker: I do not think Bigfoot -should it exist- would be any different in most aspects to some ape in a zoo. That is, Bigfoot doesn't hibernate. I could be completely wrong. But, when we need to add more and more unlikely things on the scale to make our theory work, then it probably doesn't work. The truth should generally fall into place as I see it pretty easily. Places that have real winter have the cold to deal with and everything that means. There are not any berries growing. Outdoor food sources are harder to come by. Snow falls. There are tracks of many other animals out there but somehow there are not many or any of Bigfoot. What are the options: 1) Bigfoot does not live in these areas (for the reasons I just listed) or 2) Bigfoot would be one of the only primates who happens to hibernate. Maybe we could even say for Bigfoot to exist in these winter spots Bigfoot would need to defy all expectations of other ape-like known animals and be able to hibernate. How likely should that expectation be?
    2 points
  12. You have to back up and consider all of the assumptions that you've made here. Yes, Ketchum assumed that their cleaning techniques were adequate to remove any human contamination - but as should be clear from Dr. Hart's analysis, that assumption is simply not true (and if it were, her team would be perhaps the only one ever in the history of genetics research to 100% filter out non-target DNA prior to analysis). You're also assuming that these mutations came from the same genome; they may not have at all. As Hart notes on p.37 of his book, the study's supposedly "whole genomes" alleged to be of the same species had wildly different numbers of bases (one of the nuclear sequences was nearly 5 times another!) Contamination from a common source (e.g., a human or even multiple humans working on the project) is certainly possible. I saw elsewhere where you distinguish between "Ketchum's interpretation" and "Ketchum's DNA." Fair enough to an extent. Her interpretation has been proven to be wrong. Her raw sequences, however, are certainly suspect - and seem to show obvious signs (both to Haskell and to me) of not having been produced in the ways that she claims they were (for example, the study doesn't mention how each sample was primed; her later claim that only universal primers were used doesn't seem to match up with the data or the typical protocols of the external labs that were used). Lastly, while these mutations may be rare right now in Genbank, we have to consider Genbank's limitations. There is a current effort (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2023/jan/29/the-human-genome-needs-updating-but-how-do-we-make-it-fair) to get data in from populations that are woefully underrepresented; it may be that these mutations (nor their co-incidence) are that rare at all in a certain human population. The above are just a few reasons why the jury must still be out on any special significance that Haskell's observation might have. Again, I agree with him that it is a fantastic question to investigate, but it cannot even begin to be answered without more (and more trustworthy) data.
    2 points
  13. We do all that work, put in all that time, then as a member and core member of this forums SSR team, i share it in a thread titled 'seasonal migration?' and you reply with that AFTER editing (i'd pay to see what you posted before editing) ? Seriously ? Beyond this, you're not even worthy of a reply.
    2 points
  14. Careful there, 7.62, you're starting to sound almost as frustrated as I am in trying to make sense out of what other people do. And those very people have the gall to keep charging money for little to nothing in return. Or whatever passes for a return is returned to a bar set so low by attendees and novices that I could throw a rock unseen into the brush and freak everyone out: "It's BIGFOOT!" That's how low the bar is set on Finding Bigfoot as well- if not lower. It's a real shame. Shame on them! But yeah, Bigfoot activity without the foliage screen but in winter with good visibility and the possibility of snow tracks? It's a win/win. Oh, and then there would be DNA possibilities- which never gets brought up on Finding Bigfoot, though I've yet to view even a single episode myself in all these years so that may or may not be true since Ms. Hollander is the scientist on the team. P.S. It's why I do my research in winter....nothing so far to report. Animal tracks galore everywhere, though. So....about that hibernation thing....
    2 points
  15. You know another thing that really bugs me is the paid expeditions that BFRO does and claims many have encounters that have rock throwing, knocking or they hear them close by . If they want to be so sure they are Really having encounters have them in the snow not during the summer months . Listen we hear knocking from the guide ! that's a Bigfoot we are sure ! or just had a rock or stick thrown ! Yup Bigfoot ! Well do it during the months the people can walk in the area and show the tracks in the snow where these guides say it was a Bigfoot .
    2 points
  16. Hey, good to see you on here again. I've been absent for quite a while. I do want to caution you on "running" with Haskell Hart's hypothesis, as you're going far further than he would with it. Kudos to him for finding something potentially salvageable in the Ketchum, et al, data - BUT there are (as he himself says) a number of possible explanations for how those mutations could all have shown up in that study's data, including explanations that have nothing to do with Sasquatch. His point, and it is an excellent one, is that it is worth looking for these mutations in future studies because they MIGHT be related to Sasquatch. I plan to look for these same markers in my upcoming study. I think that Haskell Hart raises a great question, but until there is more data from another source than the Ketchum, et al study, it is simply a worthy question to investigate, not a conclusion to assume is correct. (I've discussed with Haskell and this is also how he saw it.)
    2 points
  17. That became a huge issue here. Young thugs would steal SUVs and pickups in Anchorage, drive them around collecting party materials, then drive them out to the Knik River valley, outside the jurisdiction of the Anchorage Police Dept. and where there was no police coverage outside of the overstretched Alaska State Troopers. They would then get drunk, shoot the vehicle up, then set it on fire. This was happening to the tune of 150-180 vehicles per year......nearly one every two days. In the political backlash, it was revealed that Troopers feared confronting armed, drunken teen thugs because they feared shooting them and facing being sacrificed by the Department of Public Safety in an angry, emotional revenge pushback by parents seeking a lawsuit, which has occurred before. The Department uses any such event to pressure local government (the borough, or "county") to stand up and fund its own regional police department (or "sheriff's department, but unelected by the people). In short, it's a mess. Intensity of the problem ebbs and flows. The public remains in jeopardy.
    2 points
  18. The weather was good, with lots of daylight - it was late May and about 400 miles due north of the 49th parallel. It was reasonably likely that nobody would be on that road for a week or more. I always have a gun in the bush - a Remington 870 12 gauge that time. I had a week old baby at home and didn’t want my wife to worry and call the RCMP/SAR. I knew I was capable of getting out without burdening those resources. But also because, even though I had a mapbook and knew roughly where I was, I grossly underestimated the distance! The only real bad part was the work boots I was wearing had a hard insole. The soles of my feet were so sore I could barely walk for a couple of days after.
    1 point
  19. Nice pix and exploring, @entropy! Very pretty asterisk/structure!
    1 point
  20. If the supposed head of the creature is in fact a bear cub? A bear facing away usually shows tell tale signs of a head or ears. So that’s why I question what’s going on with the supposed adult bear. I think it’s all the same animal personally.
    1 point
  21. E Coast S of ME is loaded with drama royalty:)
    1 point
  22. Please show me just 1 bear doing this.
    1 point
  23. Nice adventuring in a hot spot. It's always interesting to meet and talk with fellow squatchers. The intertwining in pics 1 & 2 is intriguing. Pic 1 is something I see frequently in similarly treed areas here in BC, and I attribute it to a combination of wind and snow load taking out the poorly rooted specimens.
    1 point
  24. So glad you had such sterling help on tap from the 4x4 Rescue forum! It must have been such a relief when he showed up.
    1 point
  25. And yet another troll has hatched.
    1 point
  26. Well isn't this guy a real piece of work... I exist so I's ain't fraudulent (Hiflier's even seen me), and I's made no claim that can be declared likewise. You on the other hand are out the gates as a feckineejit. I take no offense, you shouldn't either, welcome to the club.
    1 point
  27. I ain't either but I'm not giving up title of best hunter to that Brigand. You ain't never seen me hunt so how would you know?
    1 point
  28. ETA. Actually, ignore that question. I don’t really care. Please continue. Might I ask why you consider me an “absolute fraud”? Have you and I ever discussed my personal approach to the subject?
    1 point
  29. A fairly serious statement. Personally, I don't consider the rest of the BFF members that I listed to be frauds either.
    1 point
  30. For those interested in using drones for BF research, I recommend that you listen to this podcast interview of Robert (Rob) Evans by Cliff Barackman. I found it interesting and learned a few things about what BFRO was and is doing with drones. I did not know who Rob Evans was before I listened to this interview. He is one of the folks who operated and supported the drones used during the Finding Bigfoot TV show and has been a long time supporter of BFRO and its drone research program. He worked for Microsoft for 22 years and while he lived in WA he conducted his own private BF research. He is now retired from MS, lives in Florida, and has his own drone company to support wildlife research. https://bigfoot-and-beyond-with-cliff-and-bobo.simplecast.com/episodes/ep-167-rob-evans-drone-squatching-0mk9sVHF While not drone related, he mentioned at ~ 35 min, that while providing software support to Universities that where doing wildlife research with a network of game cameras (software that he developed privately for identifying the type of wildlife captured by the camera using AI), that the universities had captured photographs of BF taken during animal monitoring research. However, these universities where not willing to share these photographs to avoid controversy and ridicule. I find it strange that wildlife biologists would hide photographic evidence, unless the photos were ambiguous and blobsquatches that had no evidentiary value. He provided some guidance for folks who want to enter into the drone research. His recommendations for Drones are as follows: Low Range: < $2,000 Parrot Bebop Yuneec H520 Nonetheless, Rob does not recommend the low price drones because they are too low end on performance and thermal imager is low resolution. Instead, he recommends that research teams pool their funds and go for the mid range. Mid Range: $6,500 to $10,000 depending on accessories and extra batteries purchased DJI Mavic 2 Enterprise Advance (has 640 x 512 px thermal camera) High Range: $20 to $30 K DJI Matrice 300 RTK This is the one he owns. At the end of the show, Cliff says that he does not use drones and mentions some of the negatives. - it is very stressful (safety issues and the required attention to controls, drone location, and situational awareness) - it is complex (you need FAA drone pilot license). Although some folks might get by with a non-commercial permit if their intent is just recreational and then just have to take the UAS Safety Test and register their drone. But any YouTube video posted that is using drones and is generating revenue is considered non-recreational (and thus commercial) and needs the FAA drone pilot license. (I could be wrong on this, but that was my interpretation after reading the FAA guidelines in https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_flyers ) - it is expensive and you need insurance (if you lose the unit or if you hurt people with it) I lean towards Cliff's position on avoiding more technology in the field. I rather investigate the night close to camp with a thermal imager. But, I fully understand that this technology offers great opportunities to wildlife capture. Maybe best to wait for less noisy, longer battery life, and cheaper units in 5 years.
    1 point
  31. Hello everyone! New member from Kentucky. Hope to see some interesting pics and videos of the mysterious elusive bigfoot.
    1 point
  32. I agree with snowy weather expeditions as making intuitive sense, problem is many gated roads in the Pacific NW and poor access and more liability for hypothermia, exposure if things head south with a paying crowd. I do not believe in a hibernation theory, I was chased out of an area by an aggressive tree push over, tree snap or something that is good at imitating earthquake and treefall noises. That while trying to access a pinchpoint with snow on the ground in an area with known action that I thought might produce prints after a nightly light snow. Taught me a big lesson if you are accessing steep terrain, have a team approach the pinchpoint from two differing directions or push through the fear and stick to your plan. In my case I was descending a ridge and the ambush was not going to happen the way I had figured and they had me figured out somehow and turned the tables on me. Taught me a big lesson and caused a long detour for me that day. The only thing I succeeded in capturing in the way of prints in the snow that year was black bear. Not even the black bear truly hibernate in my neck of the woods (southern appalachians) they just go through periods of cyclical torpor and forage under oak trees in the snow at times (when we have snow on my side of the mtns). @BobbyO anything of substance from the archives would be cool!
    1 point
  33. I found some pretty interesting data on the Ozarks in MO with some real interesting spring > summer numbers if my memory serves me right. It's real late here right now so i'll dig it out and post (my) tomorrow.
    1 point
  34. You're right cmknight, that is something one of the officers mentioned when we spoke that evening. The encounter wasn't confrontational, just them doing their job, checking a parked, running vehicle late at night. I was out of the truck, with my flashlight in hand when they pulled up. I'm very glad I had the equipment and comms that I needed, as it would have been a long, cold trek to the point where cell service became available, and I still would have needed to round up help to extract the truck the next day.
    1 point
  35. Hello I'm an English teacher in Texas. We are working on a writing project on discourse communities and how to find, participate, and learn from them. I've always been interested in Bigfoot and this interest was reawakened on my trip to the Pacific Northwest last year. I'm hoping to show my students how finding a place with like-minded individuals can be very rewarding. Looking forward to seeing, reading, and commenting on this forum.
    1 point
  36. I hope he gets to feeling better soon!
    1 point
  37. Good thoughts 2LLT and hiflier. In terms of a movie, I love the idea of an action/adventure/drama based on the Bigfoot experiences of Roger and Bob G. Since we don't know that we have a 'piece of it', my concern is that people will think that's gross, that the DNA is 'contaminated', or that it might be a deep-fake. Also, I don't think that very many people want one to be killed. To me, that would not be a hit movie, nor would anything that's documentary style (too many of those lately, imo). Absolutely, Bill Munns, Dr. Meldrum, eye-witnesses and others should be consulted! I really just think that it needs to be a well-funded, action/adventure/drama, feature-length movie based on the reality of what happened back then. Perhaps there could an epilogue (if that's the right word) at the end of the movie where they fictitiously capture a Bigfoot and the creature is so 4K and so realistic in the movie that viewers are astounded. Just get DiCaprio to star as Roger Patterson and it's a done deal. I like this topic!
    1 point
  38. I'm a middle aged female dealing with hormone cessation since 2015. I can stay out in 4-12 degee weather during a hot flash and not feel the cold AT ALL. It's wild! Can be out in those temps for 15-20 minutes until it passes. Definitely made me realize how animals who run warm can manage the winter temps. When I become so hot I immediately remove layers of clothing and if it's cool or cold I run outside until it passes. Cannot feel the cold in any way. Just something for you to consider.
    1 point
  39. This website has a plethora of old cryptozoology newsletters. I hope you find it useful. http://www.strangeark.com/cryptozoology-resources
    1 point
  40. I believe there needs to be a serious, ACCURATE, high-profile A-list movie made about the events leading up to and surrounding the Patterson/Gimlin film. I'm not referring to something left up to the discretion of some latte-sipping unicorn in Hollywood either (who's probably never even been off concrete), because if that were allowed to happen then it would surely be turned into a silly, modern-day horror/comedy like the "Mummy" with Brendan Frasier, which was simply goofy and inaccurate in so many ways that it forever ruined the reputation of many actual figures from history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GK5ott5ery8 (I expected a sweeping, captivating and serious adventure movie when that first came out - imagine my eventual disappointment). Along with Bob Gimlin, there are so many other people who could be tapped for knowledge to make a movie like this happen - people such as Munns, Meldrum, et al. The subject of "Bigfoot" has blown up to heights no one would have ever expected and at this point it has infused itself in our everyday culture that it's became commonplace and expected; most of the time it's an image portraying a loosely-associated profile of Patty stuck on something. Heck, as an example, even my 2016 Jeep Renegade has a hidden PATTY PROFILE in the rear glass striping from the factory!. So, IMO, it all truly started with the P&G film. I think a serious P&G movie is simply begging to be made and would be a major hit. One of the men responsible for bringing the original film to us is still alive and I think this needs to happen while he's still with us.
    1 point
  41. Until it's filmed walking.
    1 point
  42. These are from the 90's, but there are a bunch of "Track Record" newsletters at archive.com that may be worth reading through. https://web.archive.org/web/20041011000259/http://www.internationalbigfootsociety.com/html/the_track_record.php A bunch of "Track Record" encounters are in the John Green database, and highlighted on this forum in the John Green SSR section. You can go to https://bigfootforums.com/forum/160-john-greens-sightings-database/ and enter the search term track.php to find them.
    1 point
  43. I would strongly encourage you to access the SSR database. Admittedly, it takes a little while to understand how to enter search criteria but when you do you can customize your search. For example, I wanted to see what time of day/night produced the most sightings in my research region. That has been very helpful and what I've seen or heard over the years has fallen coincidentally occurred within those results. In your case, you might try searching sightings in your area at various altitude levels to see if there are differences by season to see if can develop a pattern. To be successful, a professional bass fisherman/woman must quickly drill down on criteria for that particular day and conditions. Termerature change, atmospheric pressure, water levels changes, color, season, time of day, shadows, and a thousand more. It may not be much different with sasquatches. Certain conditions could have them behaving a certain way. Good luck with the SSR and don't hesitate to ask us questions. We're happy to help.
    1 point
  44. Hi folks sorry for your concern. As the big male BF told me once in a dream, rumors of my extinction are very much exaggerated. Or maybe that was Mark Twain. I lost access (password) to the yahoo account that I use for the forum and due to that and a fussy password here have been unable to sign in. Just now figuring out how to get back in although logging in here was confusing and it took me several trys to get in. I did have a bad case of COVID in 2020 that took me out of field work. Have not fully recovered yet. In the mean time I have had a lot of time to think about field work in general. My encounter experience progressed from playful interaction at first and got more and more ounfriendly as time went on. I was dealing with a family group in a fairly small area who were apparently not nomadic in that they were there year round. Then clear cut logging started at the North end of their area and worked south wiping out most lanes of travel cover for them. I was present in the daytime three or more times a week. I had to have been a major problem for their food gathering and hunting. As you may remeber I cornered one against a ridgeline and advanced on it as fast as I could move through difficult down wood, trying to get it to break cover. That got me growled at and a tree broken off behind me. The final contact resulted in an infrasound attack from a very close distance. I cannot understand how I did not see the administrator of that attack because it was less than 10 feet away as evidenced by a large depression in the veggetation. It was painful, frightening, and kept me out of the woods for a couple of months. As I recovered from Covid I had a lot of time to think. The combination of my frequent presence and the clear cutting process had to put a lot of stress on that family group. I did not see or understand that I was a big part of their problem. They may have even thought I was part of the clear cut crew. I stopped seeing any footprints after a few months and stopped having any contact. Anyway I feel a lot of guilt for my part in disrupting their life and being part of the forces that made them move. The final concern I have about continuing with field work in some form is that along with the infrasound event, I had several instances where I heard something moving close by and should have seen it because of lack of cover, but did not see a thing. In one case something ran past behind me and hit my pack. I was in the middle of a logging road with no cover with ten yards or so. I cannot help but shake the feeling that they are capable of masking or going invisible somehow. Are we dealing with some predator type creature? tha Anyway that is were I am with regard to field work. I do not plan on staying out of the woods but my primary purpose for being there will be for some other reason. Maybe that is the best route to take anyway?
    1 point
  45. Great weather here on the Idaho/Washington border! Took my KLR for a ride out to check on my dad who is having some weird neurological issues after he got his 4th Covid shot. His homestead was the site of an infamous Bigfoot sighting a couple of years ago. He is a staunch disbeliever in BF. He is currently having some health issues, so I have been going out to his place daily to let his bird dog, Norm, get some exercise. Dad is in pretty bad shape and looking to re-home Norm. He's a 4 year old English Setter professionally trained by a guy in Cheney, WA that has trained a few national champion dogs. Over $3k in training invested in Norm. Sweet dog, but very active and not a good fit for an 80 yr old man who can no longer bird hunt. Weird weather out here. 40's and sunny during the day, then nasty cold and weather overnight. I want to get into the woods and looks for tracks, but still lots of snow in the mountains.
    1 point
  46. Spot on, FLIR has had major issues for repair service since they have been sold to Teledyne. The best companies are Pulsar and AGM at this time regarding ease of use, resolution and storage factors. The majority of AGM units can be bus-powered off a power bank for 5 hours ( on-board memory ) for overnight use. I highly recommend Pulsar for a higher grade unit, they are sturdy and have great sensitivity along with accurate battery life at 8 or 16 hour use. The customer support is great also, no complaints from my experience.
    1 point
  47. With a bit of research one can run down maps of cave locations, like this one for example. Although it's from 1963, one would think that most of the caves, unless entrances have been barred off, are still around: Washington Caves.pdf Local grottos of the National Spelunker's Society may have info but one needs to become a member and most locations are still fairly guarded. Search the USGS in your respective state or its mining cave locations which should reward one with active and inactive caves and mines to research. My advice? never go in one because any bat colonies present are extremely sensitive intrusion and the cave could be cross contaminated should a visitor be wearing clothes that are contaminated with, say, White Nose Virus which has already killed untold millions of bats. One can see where this idea is going? Everyone claims that the Sasquatch knows its own back yard like the back of its hand so I think it safe to say it knows where ALL the caves, bear dens, rock shelters, rock overhangs, and other such places to hunker down in extreme weather conditions. Add in that larger creatures can withstand cold better than small ones and I see no concerns with the Sasquatch riding out stretches of brutal winter conditions. On the flip side, this same idea works for the sometimes brutally hot stretches of summer weather as well. And then there's avoiding hunters and other Humans in order to have protection for the young. Many national parks do not have caves per say, but around 35 or more do. The total number is in the high 3,000's and they are closely monitored by the NPS for all kinds of science data including paleoarcheology and eDNA. So does the NPS know if Sasquatches use their caves or not? Dunno.......ask 'em.
    1 point
  48. Where do you see a bear snout? It exhibits prognathism like an ape. The mouth is protruding. The nose is dished more like an ape instead of a human. There is no hair around the eyes. The skull is cone shaped. There are no visible protruding ears like a Bear. That in no way, shape or form looks like a Bear. This explains a lot with the Jacobs photo. Prove that it’s a Sasquatch in a Bear suit?🤔🤷‍♂️
    1 point
  49. By the 5th, 6th, or 7th time wouldn’t you think maybe you get a camera ? This guy seems to be a Bigfoot magnet. Why no PGF level film to match these frequent flyer Bigfoot encounter claims?
    1 point
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