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  1. Love the old buildings and equipment, @BlackRockBigfoot. Although BC has fur trading and gold mining history going back 200+ years, not much survives in the wet coastal area where I live and explore; there is much more of what you show in the drier interior plateau. Monday, the 11th, was our Thanksgiving holiday here in Canada, and since my family did our big dinner on the Sunday, I was free to do a day trip. I chose the Mystery Valley/Eagle Creek region due to it's distance off pavement and number of reports of sightings and footprint finds over the last few decades. The start of the gravel FSR is about 45 minutes from my home, and it's about 40 km on the main logging road to reach the Mystery Valley turn off. Once I was headed up that road, I explored every branch line off it, most of which were deactivated, with cross ditching to prevent the whole trail getting washed away in our fall and winter monsoons. I saw no big game sign, and no sasquatch evidence, but did manage to bag a nice plump grouse for a future dinner. After crossing Mystery Pass into the Eagle Creek drainage, I turned upstream on the east side of the creek to a bridge about 5 km in, then headed downstream on the west side, hoping to reach Chehalis Lake on that side, but eventually reached a washout that was a bit too challenging to attempt, so I backtracked to the east side and reached the lake that way. The weather was great all day, and I sat for an hour in a camp chair during my lunch stop, with a great view of most of the creek valley below me. There were a few campers still at the north beach, where Eagle Creek feeds the lake, and lots of human and dog tracks all over the beach, so no chance of locating extra large tracks on the pebbly beach. Near dusk, I headed back towards Mystery Pass, exploring one more side branch before dark, then it was back onto the main FSR, and a bumpy 40 km back to pavement and then home.
    5 points
  2. I've decided my old Ford F150 squatch-mobile is tired and wants to find a new home. We've had a lot of adventures together. It's time to put 'er out to pasture. But I've found something that I think will suit me well in my mid-life crisis. It's being built as we speak. A few tweaks here and there perhaps, but who knows, maybe we'll have some fun together!
    5 points
  3. Here in BC all the commercial trucks using the resource roads (logging, mining, oil) must have radios that use 32 special channels in the land mobile band. Each road uses it's own dedicated channel, which is posted at km 0, and drivers must call out distance markers and direction as they pass them; i.e. "Harrison East, 2km up" or "Thurston, 5km down" For this reason, I had a commercial radio installed in my H3, and it's very comforting to know where the big rigs are. These radios (mine's an Icom) are about 10 times as powerful as CBs, and about 3 times as expensive, but well worth it in my opinion. The range is excellent, even in our very mountainous Province. We also have a dedicated frequency for the 4x4 clubs programmed into these radios, so our trail chatter doesn't interfere with the commercial users. There is a license required to use these units, but no exam, just a $40/year fee.
    5 points
  4. Found an old homestead site today. Tons of cool machinery.
    4 points
  5. Found this today while scouting for more firewood on the Newport property. Looks twisted. But old. Just curious.
    3 points
  6. No, just a Sport S. I only have so much cash. But, it will be paid off in full upon arrival. The only way to live. I hate debt.
    3 points
  7. Norseman makes me so jealous! The elk herds I grew up hunting over in Idaho have been decimated by wolves and severe weather. Since I'm a Washington resident, buying a license and tags in Idaho is around $800. I still try to get out in the woods with my dad and brother but just don't carry a rifle. I went out in the woods yesterday just to enjoy the weather and nature. Saw a few tracks, but never saw or heard a single elk, deer, bear, or even a dang grouse. Sad. Saw tons of hunting camps being set up, though. All filled with vehicles with plates from the county South of us, which is infamous for slob hunters and white trash. Almost got ran off the road by one of them hauling butt in an F250 towing a trailer full of UTVs on a single lane dirt road with blind corners. I was on my CB calling out mile markers and no response, then that idiot comes flying around a corner on my side of the road and flips me off. Still, it was a beautiful day! I started a new position in my company last Monday and now finally get weekends off, work swing shift, and am loving it. Lost ten pounds the first week just getting normal sleep and being active.
    3 points
  8. Hi Guys , We are opening a Sasquatch gift store in Forks Washington on Halloween and have a few position open .. if anyone knows anyone interested in being a manger, podcaster, screen printing please let me know Ken@SasquatchTheLegend.com or stop by we are here everyday getting it ready to open 80 N. Forks Ave Forks WA 98331 Thanks For any HELP https://sasquatchthelegend.com/pages/job-opening
    2 points
  9. From the Bigfoot Times (www.bigfoottimes.net) for October 2021, main article. Enjoy. The monthly newsletter is the best bang for your Bigfoot bucks. Bob Titmus & The P-G Film I told my colleague, Cliff Barackman, that over the long Labor Day weekend I would have a bit more time to dig into my physical files to look for information he was seeking. Cliff needs little introduction to the Bigfoot community as his hands are full with his Bigfoot museum in Boring, Oregon plus his work on a reboot of Finding Bigfoot in addition to his excellent podcast, Bigfoot & Beyond With Cliff And Bobo. Mr. Barackman went out to Bossburg, Washington recently to do some research on who made castings of the “cripplefoot” from 1969 and I was able to get him a newspaper article that seemed to infer that René Dahinden made a set (a right and left foot) of castings, which were later shown in the newspaper, the Rossland Miner, dated December 1969. The paper stated, “The molds were brought here by René Dahinden and a young companion who were seeking information.” I can’t imagine anyone else being responsible for making these “molds” [footprint castings]. Decades ago René did tell me that he got original castings from Bossburg from a “lady who had them in her attic,” but I never asked too much more about that comment. Presumably, someone else made castings. As I dug some more in the Washington newspaper section of my physical files I stumbled on a newspaper article, “Sasquatch Hunter Says Tracks Phony,” by Win Anderson, writing for the Tacoma, Washington News-Tribune for February 18, 1972. For clarifications purposes, the phony tracks mentioned in the headline were from Eatonville, Washington and not to be misconstrued as the tracks from the P-G filmsite. The article was about our old friend in the hunt, the absolutely legendary Bob Titmus, who passed away at age 79 in 1997. He was a different breed of Bigfooter. He sought no publicity and most of his outings looking for Bigfoot were by himself. I was lucky, indeed, to have met him in the field in late October 1987 in Bluff Creek and the dog he is pictured with here may have been the same one that was with him on that historic occasion. Bob Titmus did one thing that punched his own ticket to Bigfoot immortality and that was going to the P-G filmsite shortly after the film was shot to make plaster castings of the trackway left behind by Patty. Remarkably, what never found its way to any Bigfoot book was what he told the News-Tribune in 1972, something that was news to me upon reading what he told the reporter. In part it read: “Pictures won’t help. The Roger Patterson films [Editor: emphasis by me. “Films” as in plural. Bob was certain he not only saw the P-G film but a separate film of the tracks was presented as well], the only genuine movies showing a Sasquatch I know of, have only served to add to the mystery around the subject. People think it was faked.” Mr. Anderson, the reporter, went on: “Titmus immediately left the preview [Vancouver, British Columbia] of the late Patterson’s movie in Canada, flew to northern California area where the film was made, retraced Patterson’s footsteps in country Titmus was already familiar with, and discovered positive supportive evidence including Patterson’s and the Sasquatch’s footsteps.” He continued, “Titmus has studied Sasquatch tracks for so long in the area that he refers to individual animals by nickname. The one Patterson filmed, he calls ‘the old lady.’” Therein lies a wealth of information about Bob Titmus and his direct link to the the physical evidence associated with the P-G film: the footprints left behind. The film was shot on October 20th and toward the tail end of the month Bob was on site to investigate the matter. Had the trackway been faked as an avid Bigfoot investigator and taxidermist, Bob Titmus likely would have made that determination early on. Instead, he found “…positive supporting evidence.” In a letter to John Green about his trip to the filmsite he would write, “Firstly, I think that a taxidermist will see and retain far more detail, while watching an animal, and is probably far more qualified to recognize anything unnatural, than the average person.” So after watching the original P-G film in Vancouver Bob was pretty certain the footage captured a real animal as opposed to just a costumed man. We also learn for the first time that Bob Titmus - a man of modest means - was so impressed by the films (creature and the trackway) that he “flew” down to California immediately to conduct his own on site inspection. I was always under the impression that he drove, but he makes it clear to the reporter that he “flew.” The matter was that urgent. His colleagues, John Green and Rene´ Dahinden, were also present at the Vancouver showing of the films but for whatever reason decided to stay home. At the time both had young families to support and they were just miles away from the filmsite, on Blue Creek Mountain, shortly before the P-G film became the blockbuster event for 1967 and forever after. It would be easy to speculate they were financially drained right after the famous movie was made and were waiting to see how the scientific community and the press would treat the matter. Bob Titmus, a bachelor, was in the perfect break-away-position to go and check the filmsite and to cast some of the most famous tracks in all of Bigfooting history. In fact, one of the footprints he cast displayed a prominent mid-tarsal break and was photographed and left undisturbed by someone who arrived before him: Lyle Laverty. Laverty arrived on Monday, October 23rd, when the trackway was fresh. Moreover, if Bigfoot is found tomorrow the P-G trackway castings would likely be more important and more compelling than the Laetoli footprints from the Olduvai Gorge in Africa. I say that because one has the opportunity to see the Bluff Creek track maker on film, which was never the case with the Olduvai Gorge prints. John Green finally found his way to the filmsite in June of 1968 and René shortly thereafter. René did tell me more than once that not going to the filmsite immediately after it was shot was likely his biggest blunder ever. He was in Willow Creek, California immediately after the film was shot but made a decision to go to Yakima, Washington to see the premiere showing of the original P-G film. Looking back, he told me, “I could have seen the film anytime,” and that not going to the filmsite to examine the footprints was a “blunder.” Hindsight always seems to be 20/20. Since we are closing in on the 54th anniversary of the P-G film Jamie Wayne shared a handwritten note René wrote to the late Howard Walker. In part it read: “This is the piece of wood I told you about…it is 26 inches long. I picked this up [from the P-G filmsite] in ’71 and took [it] home.” After numerous trips to the filmsite and seeing that many things are still there after fifty years, it is easy to believe that a “piece of wood” could have been on the forest floor some four years after the film was shot. Think about it for the moment, who would have the presence of mind to collect “a piece of wood” from the filmsite? Remarkably, someone did. René. The subject in the movie film either steps on that piece of wood or right next to it as it moves when you study the film. René and other Bigfooters have used that piece of wood as a scale to measure Patty, but not everyone agrees on the merits of doing a simple, one-to-one ratio as a means to measure the creature in the film. Just recently I spoke with David Murphy, another southern California Bigfooter, and he reconfirmed to me that he did in fact see a “bent” stirrup at Roger Patterson’s tack room (on the outside), nailed to the wood. Though it can’t be proven at such a late date, it was likely the stirrup from Roger’s horse, Peanuts, that fell and caused Roger to have a noticeable limp later that day. I am not a horse person but it just doesn’t seem to me that cowboys nail bent stirrups to their tack room. In Roger’s own words in an interview with the late Dr. John Napier, 1968, he would say: “We had been in this area trying to find evidence of the giant creatures called Bigfoot or Sasquatch. And we had been in there about a week and a half. We were camped on the Bluff Creek there…” A week and a half, give or take a day, would put Bob Gimlin and Roger in the area on October 9th or 10th. On the commotion that caused Peanuts to bolt Roger stated, “we both fell to the ground,” which, of course, may have been the underlying cause of the bent stirrup. When asked directly by Dr. Napier about any deceitfulness or fabrication Roger replied, “I don’t believe that there was any possibility that this was a hoax.” As a researcher of the P-G film, ever piece of puzzle seems to fit nicely into a broader picture and I have never encountered any item that would discourage that point of view. What is refreshing, indeed, is to see Bob Titmus make a statement in 1972, long before the social media pundits came into play. And his summary findings: “…discovered positive supporting evidence…”
    2 points
  10. The area around us is littered with stuff like this… old machinery and equipment, old homes quietly decaying deep in the forest. When a lot of the land here was turned into national forests, there were people living there tucked away in the hollers. Some moved away per the government’s demands. Some didn’t. We find old stills fairly often.
    2 points
  11. The legs seem disproportionally long compared to the legs of our average, scientifically confirmed, Bigfoot. However, it does have a distinctly shaped 'diaper butt' so, I give it a maybe...
    2 points
  12. @BlackRockBigfoot I was hoping that the swivel clip could slide through the molle attachments (3) but it was a hair too wide. Maybe it would work if I tried to file them down but I didn't want to go there. It does attach by squeezing the top of the HPG chest pack and clipping the GoPro swivel attachment to it. The clip is very strong and has a rubber lining on the inside. That protects whatever it clips to and helps to hold it as well. I think if you fill the chest pack to the brim it would not pinch closed and thus the clip would not work. If you need to access something from inside the chest pack, you can do so by plessing the clip open and then reclipping it on when done. Also, if I need to rapidly deploy something inside the chest pack, I'd pinch the clip open and toss the phone on the ground or in my backpack exterior pocket. The phone attachment is only used when I bushwhack so when I'm on trail the smartphone GPS is in the exterior pocket of the chest pack. I use another swivel clip to attach the GoPro to the shoulder pad. It stays put. I'm very pleased with the setup. @norseman That looks like a nice setup. Never knew something like that existed. Good find.
    2 points
  13. Gotta run to the office and will look at these later. Between the recent wood knocks at the small lake and now the footprints and trackway, I am reminded of a lyric in Don McLean's song, American Pie. "They caught the last train for the coast...." That'll be me and I'm coming your way!!
    2 points
  14. And here's my video. I have a couple more 3-4 minute long videos and one 15-minute video, but I want to try my hand at editing. This one, however, looked good to stand on it's own. Plus it's one of the two excellent print lines! Our prints didn't go deep at all, just on the surface. But, I think these were made a week ago when it was raining. It's had a week to dry out and solidify. Some of the prints were four inches deep. I don't think either of us left any prints, and neither of us are lightweights. Now it's raining again and my truck broke down, so I can't get back. Looks like I'm on the city bus until I can get it fixed and NorthWind will have to drive on our weekend jaunts out to the woods! Yes, we recognize how fortunate we are. DEFINITELY. We just happen to be blessed with living at Ground Zero for sasquatch experiences. I have started a note book, and we have thirteen research locations, ranging from sites where we've found interesting things, like twisted branches on lonely trails in the middle of nowhere, all the way up to our sighting locations. We are extremely fortunate to be where we are. , we
    2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. I've seen this one floating around the last couple days and I'm with @wiiawiwband @VAfooter . i only see one subject and when I blew it on a 64in monitor it looks like there is faint tracing or mapping visible. Plus, as @wiiawiwb stated it is DEAD center and the odds lf that in a video that didnt even notice a squatch until after when looking over the footage. (which was what I read initially). It is interesting but really hard to make out with the way the pixels get blown out with the zoom. I would love to have the original footage and run it through our software and blow up the image propperly to see the real detail.
    2 points
  17. Do you two realize that most people never see a single footprint that pristine. You have a trackway and more. The impressions seem very deep too. Comparatively speaking, how deep did your shoe/boot prints go into the substrate? What's your best guess as to how old the prints were? Many believe Patty was around 6'3" and we know her step length was 41". It makes me wonder if the 72" step-length tracks were made while running. That's Carl Lewis long-jump distance for heaven's sakes! I'd be putting trailcams along the treeline in the picture where Northwind was kneeling to try to capture them. Ones that have the longest detection range. When you're at the lake, do you have cell service there? I'm sure the answer is no but, if yes, you could put a cellular trailcam there and get pictures sent to you as it happens. On balance, your day ended up far from empty. Quite full actually...you hit the jackpot!! Way to go.
    2 points
  18. I'm not pursuaded for two reasons. The legs look longer to me than they should. Patty was massive from the waist up and her legs, to my eyes, appeared thick but short. This figure has fairly long legs compared to the torso especially if you add the portion of the lower leg not visible. In real life, things happen randomly. I find it curious the "object" just happens to be positioned right in the middle of the film. I'd have to ask my math-professor buddy how to calculate the odds of that occurring but I bet it is probably very small. I would expect something to catch a person's eye causing him/her swing the camera over, in small measure or large, to capture, then focus on the movement. No reason swing left or right here because the figure is already smack dab in the middle. It looks like a setup to me.
    2 points
  19. Sounds cool! I was there in July and chatted with an old fella who recalled a road crossing that spooked loggers near Beaver, think it was off of 101 thereabouts.
    1 point
  20. Saturday, October 16, 2021 NorthWind and myself went mushroom hunting, but had no bigfoot incidents at the Mushroom Mtn location like last year. However, WE GOT CHANTERELLES! So that's awesome. On the way back, we scouted the lake with the prints we found last week for a potential night stake out. And I literally ran into a horrifically BIG spider. It's body was an inch long. Eeek! Absolutely horrifying.
    1 point
  21. Thx, Marty. 8 ) I mentioned "our average, scientifically confirmed bigfoot" because, in my opinion, the research and the evidence (notwithstanding, the video above) precludes any possibility that such animals do not exist. There is no way to reconcile the idea that every, single 'Bigfoot' report is due to insanity, lies, or misidentification. And, since all it takes for Bigfoot to exist is one valid report, there we have it.
    1 point
  22. We're spending your money faster than Usain Bolt in the 100-meter dash!!
    1 point
  23. Lmao, that's a good post, gave me a chuckle. Yeah I agree, looks fake just because of how it was shot and looks staged
    1 point
  24. Success stories are anecdotal and I'm not aware of a scientific study, in a controlled environment, testing its affect. I think most of those who claim it really works involve turkey and birds. I'm all for using anything that creates an advantage but haven't found yet the nugget of gold I'm looking for regarding HECS and terrestrial animals. Others may have.
    1 point
  25. For a fixed height bed rack, I like the EVO bed rack. For an adjustable bed rack, I like the Road Armor unit. There are a number of tents that are good. For the traditional "pop-up book" style tents, it's hard to beat ARB for quality. But I've done a couple ROAM Adventure tents lately and they seem to have the same quality as ARB at a better price. For a hardshell tent, James Baroud is the top end, but they are very expensive and have big distribution issues here in the states. For canopies, we sell the RSi Smart Cap canopies and though we get really good reviews on them, I haven't installed one yet, so can't say from a personal viewpoint. I have messed with ARE canopies in the past and they are very nice. The only canoe mounts I've done are the Rightline foam pads.
    1 point
  26. ^^^^ If y' can't find 'em, grind 'em.
    1 point
  27. Oh, goodness, that would scare me. AND I haven't driven a stick in decades. I'd have to practice!
    1 point
  28. I don't know if you are aware of the Satras in Scotland? Info found here: page 28, bottom right https://archive.org/details/historyofancient00macluoft/page/28/mode/2up There's some other mention in there as well but it's been a long time since I've read it. I think there is even mention of the possible demise of Bigfoots in Caledonia due to a particularly bad few years of extreme cold, probably due to a comet strike or volcano eruption blocking out the sun for a while causing global freezing. If you can search the text for "satras" you should find it.
    1 point
  29. Some very interesting audio recorded here.
    1 point
  30. Nice rig! I've built a couple of them the last couple years. Very capable rigs! Add a bed rack or canopy and a roof top tent and you are set for some adventures.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Nice! I'm holding out hoping they'll offer a version without the crew cab but with a little longer bed instead. ... or this: The short wheelbase, very useful for getting turned around in tight spaces, is what attracts me. Even a relatively short wheelbase truck like my current Tacoma or previous Nissan Frontier is a pain to get turned around in some places I go sort of often. This starts life as a 4-door JL model then adds a body kit. Notice the locking storage that takes the place of the rear doors? I just need to win the lottery. Or botch 8 years worth of savings. Either will do. MIB
    1 point
  33. You don't need much more than that, it uses the traction control sensors to apply brake per wheel instead of lockers, works great! Plus its lighter without all the power windows/lock motors and the rest of it. Shoot, you can hose the interior down if you had to.
    1 point
  34. When bushwhacking, I'm always trying to keep my hands completely free to balance myself, push away branches, or grab a tree. I also want to have mapping software available to view my progress. That means using a hand to hold it. These past few years, I've fiddled around with a few methods for mounting my smartphone in a way that would allow me to view maps (GAIA, CalTopo, etc) without having to hold the phone. Several methods simply did not work. I recently tried using Snap Mounts, that use magnetic plates, and was optimistic. Ingenious, for sure, but I could not get it work to my satisfaction. I finally tried using a GoPro swivel mount, a smartphone mount made by Snap Mounts, and my chest pack. The smartphone mount fits into a GoPro magnetic swivel mount which can then be clipped onto the top of a HPG chest pack. The level of the smartphone can be adjusted because the swivel moves 360 degrees. Any comparable pack, such as an Emerson Recon, works just as well. It worked and now I'm able to read the map while walking and have my hands free to do the things they need to do when bushwhacking or just hiking. When maps are no longer necessary to have in view, I can just unclip everything and put it in the chest pack. I took a picture or two from the GoPro mounted to my backpack shoulder strap using the same swivel clip. The view I see is better then what the picture below portrays but it gives you an idea of what it looks like. I'm very pleased with the outcome. https://gopro.com/en/us/shop/mounts-accessories/magnetic-swivel-clip/ATCLP-001.html https://snapmounts.com/product/snap-phone-adapter/ Note in the picture below: The shoulder mount was not level as I am still a rookie with it. Progress is being made.
    1 point
  35. SB is right! I just got a CB because logging trucks freak me out with the way they drive. They don't just THINK they own the road, they DO own the road. I kept the installation very minimal as I will soon be selling my truck for a Jeep and will move it to that.
    1 point
  36. It's ironic that I used to get 3 or 4 days off before, but now get more done with only 2 days off. Before, I used to sleep until 2 or 3 in the afternoon. Now, I am up well before noon, so have so much more daylight to get stuff done. During the work week, I have plenty of time to do chores and even go shoot before work. Before, it was wake up, shower, and get to work. Hoping to get back in shape enough to do some deep off-trail exploring in order to discover some real BF sign and habitat.
    1 point
  37. @wiiawiwb I sincerely apologize! I realized I downvoted your comment by accident. I changed it now. I am leary of trailcams to be honest. For whatever reason, they seem to drive them away, and I have witnessed that effect first hand. My footprints were quite minimal, and I am a bigger than average fellow. But the ground is much drier now than when we had a good soaking rain a week ago, which is when I think these prints were made. Still some of them were pretty clear, and even had partial (very partial) dermal ridges. In two of them, I think, the ridges seemed to run parallel with the foot, but I cannot be certain. Here's the video I was able to cobble together even after I messed up and didn't record a lot of close ups when I thought the camera was recording.
    1 point
  38. Looks like it missed leg day at the gym
    1 point
  39. I only saw one, which appears to be looped. What am I missing? Otherwise, it looks interesting, a better than average blobsquatch. The eerie music does not help either, it always sets me on alert status. At this point I would say probably no cigar, at least until more analysis is done.
    1 point
  40. Hard to make out detail but interesting either way.
    1 point
  41. Staying in cell phone service on property back home. Have seen two cows.🙄 Almost didn't get to see my septic wife because of covid rules. She is on antibiotics and doing better.
    1 point
  42. These prints were in a trackway coming up from a water source, and look like juvie prints, 3 had some toe definition.
    1 point
  43. Date & Time - Saturday, September 25, 2021. At the lake from 11am to 2pm, plus 2 hour drive either end of the trip. Location - A new, small mountain lake in the Oregon Cascades Weather - Perfect, maybe 75°F, slight variable breeze, sunshine What Happened- NorthWind and I went to see a lake that a friend of mine had visited the week before. Her photos were gorgeous, so I wanted to see it myself, and I wanted to hike. It was way up high, at around 5000 ft up in the Cascades. Supposedly has fish, though once again my tiny backpacking pole caught nothing. There was a little camp spot half way around the lake, just ideal. Someone had dragged a few tree branches near the firepit, so I spent 10 minutes cracking them down to size, and moving the firewood to a more sheltered location. About 10 minutes later, we heard a very loud and close wood knock. It was just up the hill and down the trail where we had just been - we walked until the trail ended at a rock fall, and returned to the campsite, maybe 100 yards back. We waited for anything else, but nothing. So, we "chilled" around camp, straining our ears while we feigned ignorance. I went fishing, Mark did his video. I thought i heard very faint stick pops occasionally but nothing happened. Finally, after an hour, I put my pole away and climbed part way up the mountain towards where we guessed the sounds came from. Nothing. As I was climbing down, Mark asked if I'd heard the tree fall and sadly, I had not. It was behind him, away from me. If there was someone there, they might have quietly circled around and that would explain the stick pops. Now, whatever was making the noises was right near the trail out. Eventually we reluctantly left, and had no more incidents, just a pretty uphill hike to my truck through a truly gorgeous forest. Mark's video is up on YouTube at Sasquatch Habitat Investigation Team. I'm trying my hand at video editing for the first time and it's not going well. Here I'm standing close to the rock falls. Creepy to think the wood knocker could be behind us. Across the lake is the path in. The rock fall area, from where I took the first and last photo and the knock originated.
    1 point
  44. I know Thomas... He's a good guy. He sticks his recorder in a boot overnight and will listen to every minute of what he records. I can't do that because I have thousands of hours of recordings. I have to look at the spectrum graphs to find sounds. The foot stomps are interesting, but it sounds like a deer snort when it gets close. Thomas is on the right. That's me in the back.
    1 point
  45. Here is New York and some from surrounding states. The colors represent the SSR score of each report.
    1 point
  46. Doing some research, apparently the Grendel monster had its origins in Germanic and Scandinavian legends of trolls. These descriptions certainly match what we are used to from Bigfoot reports. Yes, it is seeming more and more likely that the historic range of these creatures was once much larger than it is today. Perhaps stretching from northern Europe across Russia and into North America.
    1 point
  47. Beowulf is one such early English medieval legend. This artistic depiction of the monster Grendel curiously resembles a Bigfoot. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grendel
    1 point
  48. I think this is a critical point to understand, and I have a theory on it: I believe that a few/several families of sasquatches lived in the middle Klamath region prior to 1955 and for the past several thousand years. Their movement patterns were likely centered on seasonal climate (particularly rain and snow), anadromous fish runs, spring green-up, and the berry crop. The first major human pressure changes came with the gold rush, but it was the timber industry that really changed things permanently, because major road building was a huge part of that, roads brought so many more people, and increasing numbers of people continue to access the area because of those roads. I believe that the homo sapien invasion of the Klamath tributaries ended the intensive use of the region by sasquatches that was the case prior to the roadbuilding. I'm also quite confident that has been the case in numerous other logged areas and the entire Puget Sound coastal ecoregion.I also believe that the overall sasquatch population has decreased dramatically in the PNW over the past 150 years as the homo sapien population in the region has exploded. I suspect that the remaining "high" sasquatch population densities are along the Coast Range in central and northern British Columbia and southeast Alaska panhandle. There are still pockets of sasquatch populations in the Rockies and more eastern parts of the continent, but I'm confident that they are dying out and/or migrating out, because these creatures simply do not want to share habitat with homo sapiens, and frankly, I can't blame them. Neither do I.
    1 point
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