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Biped Or All Fours?


Guest mizzousquatchn
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For those who saw one walking on all fours, how were the legs and arms used? Did they knuckle walk like a chimp or gorilla and how did the bend their legs?

What I observed was on an extremely steep incline... side-hill and uphill... but when it got up on more level terrain, it stood up on two legs and walked...

Pithecus... cool name... your parents must have loved gladiator movies... but then, who don't? There's something for everyone in them things...

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With the many descriptions given of the arms of the Bigfoot/Sasquatch being much longer than those of a human, I see no problem with them being able to move on all fours or bipedal as the need arises.

Dr. Meldrum is not the only person to have studied the Sasquatch foot anatomy and function.

http://www.bigfootencounters.com/biology/buckley.htm

Mike (watch1)

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I found a trackway a few years ago and the tracks were 48 inches heel to toe and the tracks measured 16x6 inches. The toe area of the tracks was deeper than the heel and it was suggested at the time that it might be a 4x4 Bigfoot trackway. If so it might suggest that what ever left the tracks was walking on its toes or on the ball of the foot. I walked the 200 or so yard trackway and did not see any indication that it was a quadruped. If it was a human, it was a remarkable stride over a long distance.

http://picasaweb.google.com/indiefoot/4x4#

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did they leave tracks?

Yes they do Parnassus, but they tend to resemble bear tracks once the mid-tarsal break comes into play. I followed a trackway once for over 200 feet that then turned into what looked like bear tracks. Only the front half of the foot is touching the ground when in 4X4 mode.

The first one I saw in 4X4 mode, actually came up about even with the bottom of the window on my Chevy Blazer with the top of it's back, it was also nearly half the length of it. The smaller ones tend to resemble chimps in 4X4 mode, as one of our researchers had a close encounter with one from about 10 feet away. First time I ever heard that researcher cuss from the shock of getting that close.

I was the first to bring this forward into the mainstream Bigfoot Community well over 4 years ago, and was unmercilessly bashed for daring to claim Bigfoot went into 4X4 mode. My how the times have changed and folks are now onboard with it. I'm really glad to see that some folks have been more open to what Bigfoot does.

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This is the juvenile in 4X4 mode that was sketched by Biggjimm, the MABRC Western Oklahoma State Director for Squatchfinder, the MABRC Researcher who had the close (10 feet) encounter. Hopefully it illustrates somewhat about how 4X4 mode looks.

nLihS-434edc50.jpg

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The thumb is splayed out, if you turn it sideways, they put it out to the side to help steady themselves. The knuckles are more than twice the size of a human hand. Here is roughly what it would look like.

post-26-089648600 1283743965_thumb.jpg

Freeman's famous Low Creek Knuckle Print from July 1982 is a good example of the way it looks when they are in 4X4 mode, with the thumb splayed out away from the hand and knuckles.

post-26-097514700 1283744060_thumb.jpg

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I wonder if/how their hip joint is different from ours, to enable them to move on all fours easily, yet still allow them to walk completely upright.

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Guest ShadowPrime

Not clear on the question, maybe...

I mean, humans are bidpeds. But, we can clearly crawl, go on all fours, etc, etc, in particular circumstances. I am sure early man, when bipedal, did all of that when hunting, trying to sneak about, etc.

BUT... I think that is quite different from quadrapedal locomotion being a regular, normal, part of how a creature gets around.

So is the question the latter - that is, do folks think BF goes "non-bipedal" often, regularly, "normally"?

Shadow

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They will hunt in 4X4 mode to give them extra speed in short distances...

If you mean they can go even faster in 4x4 mode than bipedally, and if their bone structure is similar to ours, how is that even possible?

pgf.jpg

If I'm not mistaken, there are reports of bigfoot running as fast as a horse, and even keeping pace with a car, while running upright, but they can go even faster than that in 4x4 mode?

I fail to grasp why they would have a need for additional speed while in 4x4 mode if they can already pace a horse/car.

RayG

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Guest Lesmore

Great questions!

Ok... yes...

Why I think they do it: It greatly aids in locomotion... like going from 2wd to 4wd...

Why I think they do it: Many reports of them doing so... Oh yeah... and I witnessed it for myself... that too...

Do they have a low range in their transfer case when they switch to 4WD ?

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If you mean they can go even faster in 4x4 mode than bipedally, and if their bone structure is similar to ours, how is that even possible?

pgf.jpg

If I'm not mistaken, there are reports of bigfoot running as fast as a horse, and even keeping pace with a car, while running upright, but they can go even faster than that in 4x4 mode?

I fail to grasp why they would have a need for additional speed while in 4x4 mode if they can already pace a horse/car.

RayG

The reports of Bigfoot running in bipedal mode almost always goes back to straight-line running, no serious turning, no running through the trees, no dodging obstacles. Chasing a deer that will make multiple abrupt turns to get away, would be hard to do in bipedal mode, as trying to change direction at high speed would be near impossible. By being in 4X4 mode, it give the Bigfoot extra mobility and stability to make those turns. Look at a cheetah chasing down an impala, the cheetah can attain high speeds for short distances, and even then, when the impala changes direction, the cheetah will have to adjust it's own direction, slowing down in the process and then trying to attain that speed again. The Bigfoot can change direction better, go lower under tree limbs in the forest that would otherwise slow it down, and allow it to maintain a lower profile when moving in for the kill. Going across an open farm field would also be beneficial to go in 4X4 mode to avoid detection.

As for their bone structure possibly being the same as ours, we can only assume that until a body is put on the slab for dissection and verify that it is.

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Do they have a low range in their transfer case when they switch to 4WD ?

I dunno... I tried to check and almost ended up engaged... not doin' that again...

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Look at a cheetah chasing down an impala, the cheetah can attain high speeds for short distances, and even then, when the impala changes direction, the cheetah will have to adjust it's own direction, slowing down in the process and then trying to attain that speed again.

But a cheetah looks nothing like a sasquatch.

As for their bone structure possibly being the same as ours, we can only assume that until a body is put on the slab for dissection and verify that it is.

In the meantime, if the PGF shows an actual bigfoot, I see no similar body structure to a cheetah or any other 4x4 critter.

RayG

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