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"is Squatch Eating Our Kids" This Makes Me See Bf Differently, It's Scary!

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Great Squatchin Ny, now I have to watch it too!

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Guest SquatchinNY

At 7:10. Prepare yourself, it is really gross.

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Guest mitchw

DeltaZu #103 I've read the books and also thought that maybe BF was taking kids as dolls. in many of the cases the kids were found without socks(hard to run through the woods that way)and had been fed things like berries. We know human kids like to play with dolls, so why not BF? Paulides also points out that kidnapped kids were most often old enough to take some care of themselves.

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Guest

It's a typical response to remove articles of clothing as you go through the stages of hypothermia and therefore normal to find people in the woods with articles of clothing taken off or missing. This otherwise abnormal behaviour is absolutely normal.

When hungry, wouldn't a child eat berries? They don't yet know the dangers of what berries to eat or not eat. Why would anyone assume they were "fed" berries and didn't pick and eat them?

Here is the normal behaviour for a child lost in the woods...remove clothing due to exposure, eat berries due to hunger. No bigfoot need apply for the job of taking socks off kids or feeding them woodland plants.

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Guest UPs

^^^

Ace.....the child told them that a bear fed him berries. There was another case that a child was reportedly carried off by a bear. I do not have the book with me to provide the reference.

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Guest

I finally orderd a copy of The Missng 411 eastern USA. Im curious about the book and hope I can find out so more interesting cases and possible connections to BF.

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norseman

Personally I think the whole theory of BF as cannibal is BS and that the 411 series has done nothing but capitalize on timing, opportunity and *gullibility*, but you already knew that if you've followed my comments here, all jmho.

Then I take it you do not believe Native American accounts? Because Gilyuk certainly eats people.........

http://grandcherokee...play&thread=228

How powerful are these giants? A group of Indians came upon a small canyon in British Columbia, and were petrified when they saw a huge hairy giant and a large brown bear in an ear-shattering battle. It was a long, hard fight, but the giant finally strangled the big bear to death!

In 1963, I read a very interesting story that was published in Sports Afield Magazine, entitled “Long Hunter—Alaskan Style†by Russell Annabel. The story is about Tex Cobb, a mountain man who spent years trapping in Canada and Alaska. The last half of the article reported:

The Denna Indian people liked him, Tex Cobb. No sentiment was wasted on either side, but he and the tribesmen had a live-and-let-live understanding that was rare in those days. He stayed off their trap lines, and they stayed off his. If an Indian had salmon net in an eddy, Tex found another eddy, and vice versa. Due to the fact that the Indians trusted him, we became involved one autumn with what would be called, I suppose, an abominable snowman. I have since heard and read a great deal about the abominable snowman. I have seen photographs of those tracks in the snow on a Tibetan mountain, and to me they are simply the tracks of a man with gunnysacking or some other cloth wrapped around his feet for protection from the cold, climbing slewfooted because the slope was steep and he had no crampons. But when I was a youngster roaming the North with Tex, we had never heard much about Gilyuk, the shaggy cannibal giant sometimes called The-Big-Man-with-The-Little-Hat.

Our adventure with Gilyuk occurred while we were camped in a pretty spruce park on Yellowjacket Creek, south of Tyone Lake. We had spent the entire summer on this mountain-girt Nelchina Plateau, wandering and looking for fur sign. Maybe we were. He always had to have an excuse for enjoying the country, a commercial excuse if he could think of one. Anyway, it was now late September, the beautiful time, no mosquitoes, the land ablaze with color, the fish and the meat animals summer-fat, the caribou horde gathering, and we were footloose and free as perhaps men can never be again. This morning Tex was making coffee, and I was down at the creek cleaning a mess of grayling for breakfast, when six Indians filed in through the timber. They stood a moment solemnly regarding our four horses. To them a horse was a rarity, a mysterious animal. They called them McKinley moose, because Mckinley was the only president they had ever heard of, and the horses were as big as moose. I followed them to camp.

“Have you eaten?†Tex asked them in Denna.

They said they had eaten. Chief Stickman was with them. I had seen him once before, at Eklutna Village. A squat, square-faced man, very dark, with long hair and quick-moving obsidian eyes, he was the Denna boss of the entire area, and his reputation was bad. But now he had trouble that he couldn’t handle. He told us about it, balancing himself with the moccasined sole of the free foot against the knee of the supporting leg. I don’t know whether it was a bad habit or a medicine trick to ward off evil spirts, or both, but it was disconcerting. He had come into this area two days ago, he said, with some of his people to kill and cache caribou for winter use. But they discovered that Gilyuk, the shaggy giant, was hanging around. They had found sign yesterday. And of course everybody knew that Gilyuk wasn’t interested in caribou. Gilyuk ate men.

“What kind of sign?†Tex asked.

“We will take you to see it,†Stickman said. “It is not far.â€

After breakfast we followed the Indians upstream a couple of miles to a burned flat on which a nurse crop of aspen and birch had grown. In the center of the flat stood a ruined birch sapling. It had been about four inches through and maybe ten feet tall. Something had twisted the sapling as a man would twist a match stick. The wood had separated into individual fibers, the bark hung in tatters. Stickman and his hunters stood back, while Tex and I looked the site over. Moose often ride a sapling down to get at the tender upper twigs. So do caribou. But no moose or caribou had done this. This had been done by something with hands. It had happened yesterday, because the leaves of the sapling had not yet completely wilted. It wasn’t the work of lightning—no burns. A freak whirlwind hadn’t done it, because trees and brush a few yards distant were undamaged. The hard ground showed no tracks. We found no snagged hair in the brush. Absolutely nothing except the incredibly twisted birch sapling. It was without question the eeriest sight I ever beheld in the wilds.

Stickman said, “It is Gilyuk’s mark. We have seen it before.â€

I wish to make clear that to the Denna people Gilyuk was no legendary creature their grandfathers had told them about. He was reality, and they spoke of him as they spoke of the bears and wolves. They saw his sign, and they saw him. He was a shaggy giant who wore a little hat and ate men. “We want to ask you to camp with us until we have killed our caribou,†Stickman said. “Gilyuk doesn’t molest white men. Perhaps he will not molest us if you are in camp.†Stickman had already told us that he bivouacked on the shore of a pothole lake two hours to the eastward.

Tex said all right, we would move to his camp in the morning. As he spoke, he was still looking at the twisted sapling, his green eyes narrowed in thought. I couldn’t take my gaze off it either.

Stickman said, “Thanks Kosaki,†a strange word of respect, held over from the old Russian Cossack, and we parted company with the Indians.

Next morning I brought the horses in at daybreak. We ate, broke camp and were putting on the packs, when here came the Indians, all of them—all, that is, except Stickman. An old man told us that they were returning to their town on Tyone Lake. Stickman was dead, he said. Gilyuk had taken him. The chief had got up in the night and gone down to the lake, perhaps for water, but nobody knew. A squaw with a birch-bark torch found his red flannel underwear on the gravel beach. It had been torn off him. There may have been tracks, but the entire hunting party had swarmed over the beach, and by daylight no tracker on earth could have made sense of the jumble.

Well, until the day of his own death last July, while on a sentimental journey to a fateful spot in Cook Inlet, Tex was convinced that the cannibal giant Gilyuk killed Stickman. When asked if he believed in the existence of abominable snowmen, Tex would reply that he didn’t think there were any around Alaska nowadays, but that they had existed, at least one of them, a couple of decades back. This is good enough for me. I go along with it.

Edited by See-Te-Cah NC
To repair/enlarge text

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Guest

If there are known cases where humans have partaken in acts of cannibalism, due to some tradition or pure desperation, WHY is it so far fetched that a BF would eat people. We are not even the same species.

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Guest

In my opinion, a lot of the cases in 411 can be explained by normal circumstances, children and hikers wandering off the trail, animals dragging away people and bodies, murder and kidnap. However, native Americans attest that BF eats people and we have people still coming forward today that report attacks and aggressive behavior, we also know that they are fast, strong and smart enough to dispatch deer. So, whilst I believe that they have and will continue to 'take' humans whether for food or as some as the reports suggest for breeding purposes I also believe that the risk they pose is minor at best.

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Guest

My question is why wouldn't a squatch eat people? We aren't the same species so it isn't cannibalism. We have people who eat monkeys so why not?

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dmaker

My question is why wouldn't a squatch eat people? We aren't the same species so it isn't cannibalism. We have people who eat monkeys so why not?

Exactly. I believe Chimps have been known to steal and eat human babies. I don't think it's a huge stretch to imagine another large ape doing the same once in a while.

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georgerm

Attached is a aerial of Spence Field. A cluster of people are missing from this area. Does this mean BF considers this area their area and anyone coming uninvited will be a victim? Is this the home grounds of a tribe of BFs and not some rogue individuals?

http://www.thedailytimes.com/Local_News/story/Bigfoot-authority-takes-on-Park-disappearances-id-022024

Several people have vanished into the 800-square-mile Park without a trace. Perhaps the most famous of these was Martin, a 6-year-old boy, who disappeared in 1967 while on a family hike to Spence Field. Despite days of searching by nearly 1,000 people, there was never a trace found of the boy.

David Paulides, a California resident, came to Alcoa Tuesday to distribute copies of a new book to the media during a press conference that touted “disturbing new information†about the cases of Dennis Martin, Trenny Gibson and Thelma Pauline Melton, who all disappeared in the Smokies.

The book, “Missing 411: Eastern United States,†summarizes information from newspaper accounts and other sources to offer recaps of unexplained disappearances.

I

n the book, Paulides also raises questions about what he considers unusual elements of the stories.

In a wide-ranging presentation that skipped from questioning the presence of Green Berets during the search for Martin in 1967 to the content of letters from psychics concerning the investigation, Paulides alluded to what he considered discrepancies.

No allegations

Afterward, though, the journalists present pressed Paulides to explain the point of his presentation. “I’m not making any allegations,†he said in reply. Paulides did refer to accounts of “wild men†living in the Smokies but never directly made any allegations concerning a connection between their possible existence and the disappearances.

“If these wild men exist, then there is an illicit element going on that is not being acknowledged,†he said.

The author of such books as “The Hoopa Project: Bigfoot Encounters in California†and “Tribal Bigfoot,†Paulides is a former police officer.

Several people have vanished into the 800-square-mile Park without a trace. Perhaps the most famous of these was Martin, a 6-year-old boy, who disappeared in 1967 while on a family hike to Spence Field. Despite days of searching by nearly 1,000 people, there was never a trace found of the boy.

Other unsolved disappearances:

• Gibson, 16, disappeared Oct. 8, 1976, while she was on a Bearden High School field trip with other students.

•

Melton, 58, of Jacksonville, Fla., was hiking near Deep Creek Campground on Sept. 25, 1981, with two friends when she went missing.

post-447-0-72213700-1356832059_thumb.jpg

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MarkGlasgow

Having listened to several Paulides interviews the 'wildman' theory is one that piques my interest. Paulides was advised by Rangers that 'wildmen' we known to inhabit some of the areas of interest. These were not BF type creatures that were being referred to, but rather rogue humans who live off the land in the remotest parts of the parks. You would imagine that these guys would be prime suspects when foul play is suspected. Trying to find them on their own turf would be the difficult part.

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Guest

Im reading the MIssing 411 Eastern US right now and there are really a couple of cases that could be BF related. But most of them are just wierd/unexplainable! I don´t think the majority of cases can be explained by "hikers wandering off the trail, animals dragging away people and bodies, murder and kidnap". Im not going to get into the why I have that opinion because im about halfway through the book right now. I think you need to read it, or at least listen to some radio shows or research some of the cases online.

Thats the strangeness about the disappearances, some seem more like alien abductions than anything "logical". Im befuddled as to what is going on. The book is well worth the money for me... But that my opinion

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georgerm

BF is smart and cunning, and a BF abduction would be slick and fast. One theory is deep in the woods, BF considers some areas sacred. These areas are where BFs keep their permanent homes; possibly high on cliffs. If humans hike in and wander into these areas, then BF provides some sort of punishment that can't be directly attributed to them. This is where cluster abductions comes to light since others wander into this land of no return.

In the case of the Martin boy, BF waits for the chance to grab him without being detected. This is where cunning comes to play. This way, BF does not have to worry about small bands of humans coming after them. Just a theory...............

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