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100 Bigfoot Nights


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Guest JenJen of Oldstones

Regarding the night vision scope, the author says, "I remembered we had a night vision scope and binoculars in the garage with Dean's old military gear." I think somewhere else in the book she mentions that her husband (Dean) was an experienced hunter. Aren't night vision scopes sold for hunting?

 

Do army surplus stores carry military-issue night vision scopes?

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The cutting edge stuff ... night vision and thermal imaging ... is generally not available.   Equipment based on older tech is available.   You can probably get it at a surplus store ... a well stocked store would have it.  You can definitely get it online.   Generally the newer the gear is, the more cost-prohibitive it gets. 

 

MIB 

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the NV scope she describes sounds like a 1st or 2nd gen passive device, what was called a Starlight Scope when I was in the army.  The were bulky and by today's standards not great but at the time (late 70s) were still pretty cosmic stuff.  With a Starlight rifle scope mounted on an M-16 and with minimal ambient light (they flared out if there was too much light, something she describes happening to her but that she didn't know the cause of at the time, which lends some credibility for me), it was no problem hitting a human sized target out to 100 yards (the farthest I tried it) at night.   There were some snipers that really handed the enemy their rear end with these things during the Vietnam war...

 

1st & 2nd gen NV stuff is available to the civilian market and to LE via DOD surplus.  My department has some.   Russian 1st & 2nd gen stuff is pretty common and can be bought at many sporting goods stores... 

 

If this gal can scratch up the cost & buys or some benefactor supplies her with some high end commercially available thermal recording stuff, she could really rock the BF world...

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Yes, NV is readily available on the commercial market. The newer, better stuff (US and Israeli) costs a lot more. The top of the line cutting edge stuff is still not available to the public of course. I grabbed a pair of 1st gen Russian binoculars almost 20 years ago through a catalog and mail order. A lot depends on whether it depends on whether it is passive or active gear, light intensifier or thermal imager. The best units I found on the market right now are Gen 3 models. It will also make your wallet (or purse) a bit lighter as well. Overstock.com has over 100 models available. Opticsplanet.com has reviews on over 1600 models...

 

Yeah, NV units are out there.

 

Of course if you are active duty and have an interest in BF, you may just be able to lay your hands on something a little better to help you out in the field over the weekend. Just try not to break it though....

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With a 1st gen Starlight unit, it allowed the used to easily identify another soldier by his face at 25 yds to maybe 50 yds on a moonless night and allowed the user to easily see a human from 100-200 yards if the conditions were favorable.  It wasn't necessarily a clear view as they in truth vulnerable to flaring out if it was put on a light source, and as the author pointed out, required constant focusing & re-focusing and even then the field of view was often squirrelly (the word pixilated didn't exist back then but it was the same general effect).  If you were looking at brush moving with the wind it created all sorts of visual anomalies while it was raining or snowing they were close to useless.  But...

 

A Starlight would allow her to see boogers at night within the distances she reports.  In my experience the results she has reported would be accurate, good to very good but nearly but not quite perfect focus under favorable conditions.

 

The more I read & re-read the book I'm leaning harder toward it happening as she has reported.  I just can't make the leap to the supernatural things she is seeing & interpreting as such, and I have long thought "dogmen" are a differently shaped standard issue BF, but we each have to make such assessments based on our best personal judgment .

 

One thing's for sure, I will be impatiently waiting for she & her family to share more of their experiences, audio, and video, as they come up.  I hope they can get their hands on some higher end video recording equipment.  If you drop in on this forum, good luck and be safe, both you & your family...

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NDT, why do you call them "monkees"?

 

Interesting angle. Some people believe that Peter Tork could personally be behind up to 70% of the phenomenon.

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"Tantrum"

To me? It sounds real close to my redbone hounds "chop" and "bawls". I got rid of my dogs, but here is a blue tick:

Edited by norseman
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I agree, norse....it (tantrum) sounded much like one of the raccoon dogs I used to work with....the quality (lack thereof) of the recording "changes" the timbre of the "vocal",....to the degree that it required attentive listening....but my first thought was..... raccoon dog. 

 

edited to correct abbreviation of racoon

Edited by HairyWildMan
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"Tantrum"

To me? It sounds real close to my redbone hounds "chop" and "bawls". I got rid of my dogs, but here is a blue tick:

 

 

redbone was the first thing I thought...   as a hog hunter, i've heard a bunch of bay dogs..

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I'm hearing canid.  Coyote amplified by an arroyo or drainage catch basin maybe?

 

Just an aside, and a pet peeve: U.S. locomotives have not had "whistles" on them in about 65 years.

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On the Tantrum, I'd agree that it is canid-like. I haven't been able to play with the sounds but I've heard recordings before that when slowed down just a tad they were very much like this. Some of the coyote outbreaks also sounded like they were shifted in playback speed, but in the other direction. They sounded a little fast and high pitched with it's rapid yapping.

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I heard something like a hound dog in the tantrum, maybe a cougar growl in another, coyotes for sure and it sounded like a rabbit being killed in one of them. Rabbits make horrible, chilling noises when being killed. By the way the train across the lake still has a whistle.

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Guest JenJen of Oldstones

I thought "tantrum" sounded like a wounded or dying dog, so I'm really glad that you're all saying it's a normal / healthy dog in the vocalizations.

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Interesting angle. Some people believe that Peter Tork could personally be behind up to 70% of the phenomenon.

 

yes, tork could be in on it. 

 

davy jones death in 2012 cleared him of all suspicions since sightings have continued , however cutting edge research  still occurs here http://www.monkees.net/

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