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Cotter

Orangutan Learns To 'speak'. Could Bf Language Just Be A Mimic?

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Guest

That theory of mimicry of Chinese miners/workers being suggested, does anyone know of anyone conversant in, or familiar enough with Mandarin or other Asian dialects who has listened to the recorded "chatter"?  Perhaps someone knowledgeable in the many dialects might recognize something that does sound like real words, mimicked or understood by the chatterer. That would be too cool, if someone did recognize their home or native tongue being voiced by an undocumented creature, maybe saying things like, "Work Harder!"  "Find the Gold!"  "Bring Water!" or other probable common shouted communications amongst men.

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BobbyO
SSR Team

I speak Thai and have an understanding of Laotian and Khmer but this stuff bares little to no resemblance of that, although of course that's SE Asian and more crucially, only my opinion.

To someone else they might say it sounds similar.

But again I point to "samurai chatter" and the origins of that term, which is of course Japanese.

I classified a WA report recently that specifically described a form of "what can best be described as mumbled Japanese".

No mention of the word "samurai" but to that person, he specifically used "Japanese" as a descriptive of what he was hearing.

Of course and no disrespect to anyone, but recognising any foreign/alien language correctly requires experience in that language and if you don't have that experience then it's fair to say that you may not be best qualified to identify what it is.

But people can describe it, and there are numerous reports that point to this "language" being spoken sounding like an Asian language, or something close to it.

I don't think these things when people are reporting this chatter, are mimicking anything or anyone.

I think they are using a form of "language" or something that we would classify to be a form of language, to communicate with each other.

The great apes don't do that, they mimic humans as is seen in that video. Great apes don't use a form of language to communicate neither even though we have now discovered they're capable of it.

This is what I believe makes them different, there are Sasquatch reports that people describe them "talking" when it seems they're not aware they're being listened to and witnesses have thought that it was coming from more than one individual.

If that is the case then it's fair to assume they are communicating.

Of course though it could be that they are aware of the human and are mimicking previous observations of humans in that instance for whatever reason.

I doubt it'd be to attempt contact personally if that was the case, but I think it's more realistic to think that these things are communicating with each other using a form of what we interpret as a language.

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MIB

Perhaps the perception of familiarity of language is an auditory version of pareidolia.    Just as we try to match visual inputs to known patterns, we try to match audio inputs to known patterns.  If they are close but not exact, perhaps it's our minds filling in the blanks that makes it seem familiar.

 

MIB

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Guest DWA

Could be mimic, sure.  One thing you can guarantee about wild animals:  they see, and hear, a lot more of us than we do of them.

 

But this is a question we won't even begin to answer until after scientific confirmation.

 

Shoot, with all the questions there will be, "Finding Bigfoot" will only start taking off when they "find" bigfoot.

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BobbyO
SSR Team

Perhaps the perception of familiarity of language is an auditory version of pareidolia.    Just as we try to match visual inputs to known patterns, we try to match audio inputs to known patterns.  If they are close but not exact, perhaps it's our minds filling in the blanks that makes it seem familiar.

 

MIB

Absolutely, but it does have a certain degree of merit when different people describe it similarly to others, IE this Asian type of language and the Japanese/Samurai style which gets described on numerous occasions then "speech" has been reported.

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Cotter

Is it really possible that a BF could be so influenced by humans as to routinely mimic our speech?

 

That's kind of my question. 

 

@SouthernYahoo - The BF in the Sierra sounds possibly are initiating the 'conversation' based on previous observations of humans as it may take a long time for the mimicing to be learned.

 

I dunno either way, I saw the link, and thought it would be a fun discussion.

 

@Neanderfoot - Don't think of it as much as modern language, but more along the lines of primitive/the advent of language.

 

The folks in the movie "The God's must be crazy" don't really sound like they're talking in a 'human' language what with all the pops, clicks, and whistles.

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Guest DWA

MIB's point about "auditory pareidolia" is important.  We do tend to fill in a lot of blanks.  Here's a researcher doing it.

 

http://www.bfro.net/GDB/show_report.asp?id=47026

 

"It started with loud crashing, limb breaks and intimidating behavior."  Well, no.  The latter isn't happening (that we know of at least) unless we know that an animal is doing it with a more or less blatant intent to intimidate.  Which generally involves seeing the animal.  Describe what the witness saw and heard; don't fill in blanks.

 

"I imitated the Ohio - Moaning Howl for him and he said that was exactly the sound he heard."  Um, OK, so he heard some yahoo yelling in the woods?  Very likely, if he heard a sound a human made.  Was the Ohio recording - which I can assure you isn't a person - played for him?  Imitating something you heard may be necessary, but one must remember it is filling in blanks, and nothing close to a conclusion can be drawn from it.

 

Researchers familiar with "samurai chatter" can inadvertently fill in blanks and guide a witness, even without intending to.

Edited by DWA

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Cotter

The sounds coming from a miming camp would be a din to anything.

 

I can't imagine ANY sounds coming from a miming camp!

 

LOL!  I know you just mispelled 'mining', but I couldn't pass up the opportunity!

 

:-)

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Guest DWA

Well, now, I dunno.  I once heard the sound of one hand clapping coming from a miming camp.

Edited by DWA

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southernyahoo

I've heard one interesting recording that was from a nightvision video that showed a figure moving an ice chest on a picnic table. I think MK Davis had done some analysis of the vid if you all remember. The audio actually did sound like some of my coworkers (whom are vietnamese decent) speaking broken english. Part of how it sounded to me could have been through suggestion or just my brain trying to make sense of words that may not have gone together like they were percieved.  

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Guest ChasingRabbits

If BFs were to adopt the word "Fire" into their language because they hear people say "fire", they see a fire and begin to associate the word "fire" with the actual fire in order for  the word "Fire" to mean fire (as we mean it to be.)  Otherwise, the word can have a totally different meaning in BF language.

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Catmandoo

Remember, "a mime is a terrible thing to waste" and in the movie "Silent Movie", there was only one spoken word. I digress.

The point made by MIB about 'auditory pareidolia' is very valid. When I heard 'samurai chatter', I was walking up a river bed. Each time I heard a burst of chatter, I stopped and aimed my ears towards the sounds and 'worked' hard to try to pick up familiar words. There was a little windage at the time and white noise from flowing water.

Is the 'samurai chatter' regional?

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sheri

What did the orang say cotter ? I don't hear words or vowels. I just hear sounds.

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Cotter

It's important to realize that this 'tan wasn't speaking like a human (communicating), but rather was exhibiting signs of early language.  Hence the 'speak' in quotes.

 

 

 â€œLip-smacking†is the scientific term to describe how humans move their lips when they talk. While scientists previously thought this was a phenomenon unique to humans, it looks like our not-so-distant neighbors, the orangutan have also been observed lip-smacking as well."

 

"Research published in the journal Public Library of Science ONE, reveals that orangutans can not only learn new calls, but these calls bare a striking similarity to human words. This development lends itself to the possibility that orangutans are learning to speak in the same way our human ancestors did."

 

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/orangutans-may-hold-the-key-to-human-language/

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Guest

Gorillas are way more advanced than Orangs, already have sign language, and words, and make-up words and put sentences together at a 5-8 year old level. Orangs are just a bunch of monkeys. :wild:

 

Remember, there is the Sierra recordings, and there is also a "word-interpretation" of the Sierra recordings: 'You Got Good Will?''= Haaaw Haaww, =Why he repeating? etc...

 

Obviously they are no longer exposed to Chinese language, would be English for over 100 years.

Edited by Wag

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