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Poll: When Would An Announcement Of e-DNA Positive For Sasquatch Be Made?


hiflier
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When Would An Announcement Of e-DNA Positive For Sasquatch Be Made?  

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  • Sésquac
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I have heard his accounts also.

Edited by hiflier
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I'll answer your last question first. No snow fall at those depths or any depth in that area. Especially considering the light winters we've been having in that time frame. 

 

It seems to me that to eliminate the whole hominoid family tree as you did above is a little premature. We don't even have DNA for all the subjects you listed. Sasquatch might as well be alien with the description you provided above. We do need a type specimen. But, until that time we are simply jumping the gun. 

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  • Sésquac
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2 minutes ago, BigTreeWalker said:

Sasquatch might as well be alien with the description you provided above. We do need a type specimen. But, until that time we are simply jumping the gun. 

 

You are right of course. Shouldn't have made such a broad sweep. I think I do need to wait then to see if the 'boys' are looking deeper into markers beyond 16S rRNA. I mean, who else is going to if they don't? Thanks BTW.

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56 minutes ago, WSA said:

Saw Derek narrating a recreation of his encounter just the other night..getting freaked out by two rocks landing virtually next to each other in his campsite, with no thrower in sight. He continues to impress me on this topic.

 

 As they ran down the trail he stopped to pull his firearm from his pack, at that moment he spotted one of the creatures.      I have known Derek a number of years and can say he is a very good man with not a hint of embellishment in his words.  

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  In researching the evolution of the brain as it pertains to throwing objects, William H. Calvin comes up again and again.  Not surprisingly, there is a large volume of neuroscience dedicated to this subject, which is well worth reading about. After all, how many American Indian cultures describe Sasquatch based on this very widespread tendency to throw objects?  "A lot", seems to be a good estimate.

 

 

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  • Sésquac
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Thank you, WSA. What was interesting was the parallel drawn between accurate, farther rock throwing and language development since both, when thought about, required timing and precision. And both got better as more neurons were added to the brain's and body's banks of collective cell involvement. An enjoyable paper all around  :)  

 

Also of note, the success of hunting by rock throwing appeared to favor an individual rock thrower as opposed to a group of rock throwers. I immediately thought of Beck's Ape Canyon story.

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It does raise all kinds of possibilities for predicting BF adaptation, doesn't it?  I don't go so far as saying that because both our species and BF apparently are proficient at hurling objects that this conclusively proves we are of the same species. Two ape species could exploit a mutation for throwing proficiency just as easy as one could, and it might just be a case coincidental co-evolution. Still, you have to admit that when you realize the number of neurons needed to fire simultaneously to throw an object at high speed, and hit a  target, you also realize that this ability we sort of take for granted in H. sapiens is (so far) proven to be unique to us and enabled by a very complex neurological structure. Not only is a complex brain required to do it,  the adaptive advantages may have contributed to enlarging our brain's complexity to begin with, by enlarging our probabilities of obtaining a calorically dense diet more often.

 

But wait, you say..."Where is the evidence of BF having the ability to hit a target with any consistency"?  I'd say it is completely able to do that by the evidence that it is able to consistently avoid hitting objects.  How many accounts have we seen where rocks or other stuff consistently landed in a small area, coming very close to the observer, but never hitting them? That takes as much skill and accuracy as consistently hitting the person. Which is why I agree with those who say if a BF wanted to hit us with a rock, it easily has that capability.  (Only one or two accounts have I read where a thrown object actually hit the observer, and then it appeared only because the object bounced in a quirky way. But hey, even Nolan Ryan had "off" days and even Sasquatch might miscalculate windage/elevation!) 

 

The next point I'm pondering is, "Is Sasquatch able to understand what a pointing gesture is/indicates"?  Does anybody know of any evidence in the sighting database that might shed light on that? If is a very important distinction when classifying ape vs. man behavior, but nothing is coming to mind for me. 

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1 hour ago, WSA said:

 

The next point I'm pondering is, "Is Sasquatch able to understand what a pointing gesture is/indicates"?  Does anybody know of any evidence in the sighting database that might shed light on that? If is a very important distinction when classifying ape vs. man behavior, but nothing is coming to mind for me. 

I don't know about a "pointing gesture", but Mr. Howdy, a male Sasquatch seen in Anderson County, Kentucky, has been reported to wave to those he encounters.  He's my avatar. 

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  • Sésquac
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1 hour ago, WSA said:

But wait, you say..."Where is the evidence of BF having the ability to hit a target with any consistency"?  I'd say it is completely able to do that by the evidence that it is able to consistently avoid hitting objects.  How many accounts have we seen where rocks or other stuff consistently landed in a small area, coming very close to the observer, but never hitting them? That takes as much skill and accuracy as consistently hitting the person.

 

I would have to disagree, WSA. The game of tossing bean bags into a hole on a wooden platform is a pretty good example. How many get one in every time no matter their age or dexterity? It is easier and more consistent to MISS than to slide one in, or even more rare, to drop one in as in 'nothin' but net'. Ant that game isn't a high velocity, high distance exercise.

 

1 hour ago, WSA said:

Which is why I agree with those who say if a BF wanted to hit us with a rock, it easily has that capability.  (Only one or two accounts have I read where a thrown object actually hit the observer, and then it appeared only because the object bounced in a quirky way. But hey, even Nolan Ryan had "off" days and even Sasquatch might miscalculate windage/elevation!)

 

"Easily having that capability" is not synonymous with precision. Only two accounts you say? They wouldn't last a morning in the minors ;) 

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7 minutes ago, hiflier said:

 

I would have to disagree, WSA. The game of tossing bean bags into a hole on a wooden platform is a pretty good example. How many get one in every time no matter their age or dexterity? It is easier and more consistent to MISS than to slide one in, or even more rare, to drop one in as in 'nothin' but net'. Ant that game isn't a high velocity, high distance exercise.

 

 

"Easily having that capability" is not synonymous with precision. Only two accounts you say? They wouldn't last a morning in the minors ;) 

 

 Practice makes perfect, especially if your hungry.      We also have to consider this,  these creatures have been spotted throwing objects at potential prey animals.   

 

 Side note:  I actually have been hit with a rock that came flying out of the woods, about the half the size of a golf ball.  I think it was in late fall 2011 back in Michigan, I had a massive lump on my head for about two days.

 

 In 2009 after my sighting I and my family examined the dead fawn that the sasquatch had been carrying around.   We noted that the very center of the skull was crushed by some kind of round blunt object ( behind the orbital sockets directly over the brain case ).  The sighting took place within a few hundred feet of a large rock pile.     Just a few events that I thought  those reading may consider. 

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  • Sésquac
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26 minutes ago, NathanFooter said:

We noted that the very center of the skull was crushed by some kind of round blunt object ( behind the orbital sockets directly over the brain case ).  The sighting took place within a few hundred feet of a large rock pile.

 

Ruling out a blow to the head by a handheld rock? Or a strong poke with a strong stick? I am not trying to negate the possibility of a rock thrown with accuracy at high velocity, NF. Just figured it better to leave other options on the table a well. Especially if someone didn't actually see the damage being done. It is why I keep asking the questions regarding the relatively widespread huckleberry damage at the  site of these nest-like structures. Because no one actually witnessed the destruction. However, the remnant ends of the plants do tell the story of the destruction even though it does not answer the question regarding the destroyer.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bluegrassfoot said:

I don't know about a "pointing gesture", but Mr. Howdy, a male Sasquatch seen in Anderson County, Kentucky, has been reported to wave to those he encounters.  He's my avatar. 

 

That would creep me out.

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