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RedHawk454

How dangerous is it to be BiGFooting alone?

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RedHawk454

I do a lot of solo dispersed and remote camping in Colorado and Wyoming year round.  My stomping grounds are the San Juan National forest near the Colorado/New mexico border off State highway 84.  I enjoy the outdoors a lot and my interest in the outdoors and Sasquatch are kindof unrelated.  When camping I am not looking for or thinking about the creature at all.  

 

I'm not a knower, but a firm believer.  One time during a 2 day camp trip with my brother and cousin  we had some audibles that got more and more aggressive each night.  The first night I heard what sounded like a banshee shrieking a few hundred feet away from me.   The second night  I was sitting near the campfire and around ~10Pm I heard something scream gibberish at me.  Like within 100'.  I thought it was a mountain lion, and it started off as sounding a like mountain lion for the first second or so and then it sounded like gibberish.  Later that night at 12:50 AM I woke up as something came into our camp sight and it sounded big.  It sounded like it was throwing debris around (logs, branches etc.).  We didn't see anything indicative of anything being in our campsite.  The grass was pretty tall too so it isnt rly the best place to look for prints..  That's all I have as far as personal encounters go but I don't necessarily to Sasquatch (all three instances could have been anything).   It was Archuleta county Colorado which has a couple class A sightings.

 

In mid May i'm planning a Saturday to the following Sunday camp trip through the PNW.  It will likely start in the Olympic National forest for 2-3 days and then I'll head south to Mt Hood National Forest and camp there for a few days and continue south and wrap it up at Crater Lake.  

 

I may do it alone, I may not.  I've read a lot of stuff on Sasquatch ranging from M411 to Tribal Bigfoot to Bigfoot Terror in the woods by WJ Sheehan and listening to Bob Gymlans videos as well as the occasion Sasquatch chronicles.  It seems the unhinged Sasquatches like to twist peoples heads off but none of those scary stories stop me from going in the woods.  There was even one encounter in Bigfoot:  Terror in the woods where some ATV'rs were doing some remote camping somewhere in Washington and one of the ATV'ers passed out on his atv for the night and his buddies didn't find him the next day.  Apparently some time later some SAR found his his glove with a hand in it pHC7b9f.gif

 

Most encounters I've read about seem to be negative and terrifying especially nighttime encounters.  

 

 

I don't want to have a camping encounter by myself as I enjoy the woods too much.  I'm totally down for some of the road sight encounter time though.   And most encounters seem to be pretty random and from what i;ve read, its usually when the Sasquatch is preoccupied with something else and it becomes slightly unaware of its surroundings..  

 

But how dangerous would it rly be to be doing some solo dispersed camping in well known Sasquatch territory?

 

I say BigFooTing alone in the title but that wouldn't be my objective.  

 

 

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Talmadge Mooseman

It does seem to be safer not to squatch and camp alone, and I'm not quite sure why, because having a single buddy would not make much of a difference if tangling with a Squatch. But two or more does seem to be a deterrent to disappearing.

 

Bigfoot aside, it is just a safe practice to not go it alone.

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Huntster

This question comes close to home to me. Here in Alaska, the standard advice is not to go out in the wilderness alone for any purpose. Highly experienced outdoorsmen often ignore that advice, but they also regularly have close calls or die, too. 

 

Mrs. Huntster used to be adamant that I had companions with me when hunting, fishing, and exploring, but starting in 2001, things started happening, and it was always me getting hurt, and always my partners doing the stupid stuff that got me hurt. I got shot in the head. I got set on fire. They shot the first game animal that showed up, and suddenly needed to go home. Their rigs broke down, and I had to drag their shit out. I was always the cook and dishwasher. Finally, my last 800 mile riverboat moose hunt was the final straw. It was one disasterous cluster-bang after the next for two weeks. 

 

Ever since then I go alone. If I’m going to die out there, so be it; it won’t be my “buddy” killing me, using me, getting me to buy their fuel because they “forgot their money”, etc. 

 

And, suddenly, I started enjoying myself again!

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MindSquatch

I personally stay out of California State Parks as your not allowed to protect yourself unless you're a ranger who is allowed to have a gun, but you are not. Seems hikers who stick to the main trails such as the PCT don't seem to have much issues with Bigfoot's. Going off trail where the Bigfoot's aren't used to seeing people coming into their area may bring about some night time and daytime agressive behavior. I've read so many reports from the Sierra's where the Bigfoot's seem to be pissed off at hikers, trail crews, campers and hunters. The Bigfoot's have a strange mindset which make them unpredictable, and it doesn't seem to matter if you're by yourself or with others. I remember a report from the Western Sierra's just north of Yosemite where a father and son went deer hunting together some years ago. The son went up a mountain side as the father stayed in camp watching his son make his way up and noticed a Bigfoot stalking his son following him from the side (the trees were short due to pass logging). His son had no idea he was being followed. Not sure what came of it as I can't seem to find that report anywhere. Not sure if the father fired a shot into the air or what. But that can't be good if a Bigfoot is stalking you when out by yourself. But the odds of something happening is low, but there's always that chance. You'll feel better if you have a couple of people with you deep in the spooky mountains camping at night.

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norseman
10 hours ago, RedHawk454 said:

I do a lot of solo dispersed and remote camping in Colorado and Wyoming year round.  My stomping grounds are the San Juan National forest near the Colorado/New mexico border off State highway 84.  I enjoy the outdoors a lot and my interest in the outdoors and Sasquatch are kindof unrelated.  When camping I am not looking for or thinking about the creature at all.  

 

I'm not a knower, but a firm believer.  One time during a 2 day camp trip with my brother and cousin  we had some audibles that got more and more aggressive each night.  The first night I heard what sounded like a banshee shrieking a few hundred feet away from me.   The second night  I was sitting near the campfire and around ~10Pm I heard something scream gibberish at me.  Like within 100'.  I thought it was a mountain lion, and it started off as sounding a like mountain lion for the first second or so and then it sounded like gibberish.  Later that night at 12:50 AM I woke up as something came into our camp sight and it sounded big.  It sounded like it was throwing debris around (logs, branches etc.).  We didn't see anything indicative of anything being in our campsite.  The grass was pretty tall too so it isnt rly the best place to look for prints..  That's all I have as far as personal encounters go but I don't necessarily to Sasquatch (all three instances could have been anything).   It was Archuleta county Colorado which has a couple class A sightings.

 

In mid May i'm planning a Saturday to the following Sunday camp trip through the PNW.  It will likely start in the Olympic National forest for 2-3 days and then I'll head south to Mt Hood National Forest and camp there for a few days and continue south and wrap it up at Crater Lake.  

 

I may do it alone, I may not.  I've read a lot of stuff on Sasquatch ranging from M411 to Tribal Bigfoot to Bigfoot Terror in the woods by WJ Sheehan and listening to Bob Gymlans videos as well as the occasion Sasquatch chronicles.  It seems the unhinged Sasquatches like to twist peoples heads off but none of those scary stories stop me from going in the woods.  There was even one encounter in Bigfoot:  Terror in the woods where some ATV'rs were doing some remote camping somewhere in Washington and one of the ATV'ers passed out on his atv for the night and his buddies didn't find him the next day.  Apparently some time later some SAR found his his glove with a hand in it pHC7b9f.gif

 

Most encounters I've read about seem to be negative and terrifying especially nighttime encounters.  

 

 

I don't want to have a camping encounter by myself as I enjoy the woods too much.  I'm totally down for some of the road sight encounter time though.   And most encounters seem to be pretty random and from what i;ve read, its usually when the Sasquatch is preoccupied with something else and it becomes slightly unaware of its surroundings..  

 

But how dangerous would it rly be to be doing some solo dispersed camping in well known Sasquatch territory?

 

I say BigFooTing alone in the title but that wouldn't be my objective.  

 

 

 

Its always a risk. Always.

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Trogluddite

There's probably no statistical difference in the risk between bigfooting alone and camping/hiking alone unless you are planning on shooting one, in which case the risk is probably the same as if you're planning on shooting a bear and miss (or only injure it).  

17 hours ago, RedHawk454 said:

Most encounters I've read about seem to be negative and terrifying especially nighttime encounters. 

Are you sure you're reading these at credible sites?  A lot of "bigfoot" sites and shows focus on entertainment, not research, and it's more entertaining to tell about a close call and incredible escape from a violent animal.  Not saying that it wouldn't be scary to have an encounter w/any large animal nearby at night if you were in a tent, but I've seen very few encounter reports that are 1) credible and 2) involve harm or a clear, present threat to harm.  

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wiiawiwb

Is it more of a risk being alone? I believe it probably is but you can manage risk by identifying the factors involved and addressing them one at a time before you ever set out. 

 

Bring a big-bore revolver or bear spray if you're not allowed to carry. Learn wilderness survival skills and practice them in controlled environments. There are wilderness survival schools out there. Learn wilderness navigation skills as it is a big boost to your confidence. You can join a SAR group and hone skills there. Always have a backup or second method for fire, water, and shelter.  Learn night sounds for your particular region. You'll be able to relax when you hear a bobcat or fox scream.  Always have a way to call in the cavalry if things go south. It can be a PLB, satellite phone, or satellite messenger.  Study the topo maps of the area you'll be in and have an exit plan ahead of time to depart a different way than you arrived. 

 

Probably most important in my opinion is to always be on alert and always monitor your surrounding 24/7.  When I'm with someone else, it is easy to get lost in conversation and miss something. When I'm alone, I'm always listening and looking. What is out of place? What should be here and isn't or what isn't here and should be? I'm looking for a moving or broken branch, leaves fluttering, or ground impressions on and off trail. I'm also listening for a subtle twig snap, water splash, footfalls, or anything that will provide information that something is out there.

 

Certain skills take a lifetime to learn but you can become more acquainted with your surroundings by studying them and constantly practicing skills.

 

Edited - My tracking skills are not very good and it is one area I plan on getting formal training. I know a Native American who provides hands on work but his classes are booked at least a year or two in advance. I better get off my duff and get into one of them. These skills once learned will help to provide better clarity of whether something has passed through the area and if so, what and when.

Edited by wiiawiwb
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RedHawk454

I've been only doing this for two years.  I've learned a lot in that time.  Mainly its important to stay dry, keep hydrated, and always have a way to exit.  Most of the time If I do go camping a lone I'm armed but If I go to Washington and Oregon I will prolly only brings a good bush knife and bear spray.  Washington has some bad gun and knife laws in regards to open carry.  Oregon has much better knife laws.  

 

I'm not afraid of going in the woods alone but I know there's risks.   The PNW I would be pretty unfamiliar with but I've studied that region a lot.  

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SWWASAS

Lately in with the cougar attacks in both Oregon and Washington,  I would think that cougars are more of a danger than BF.    Those are a matter of record.     The ones that usually go missing and are never found in Oregon and Washington, are solo women.   There have been several gone missing in what I consider BF habitat near me.    .     Cougar would be suspect for them because of their smaller stature makes attack more likely and because it is unlikely a woman would carry a weapon.   But without finding bodies, there is no evidence what really happens to them.    I have not been confronted by a BF that knew I was there,  unless I was messing with it,    but I sure have been by an aggressive cougar.   I worry about cougar more during solo field work.  

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Huntster

Cougars love women, especially those that run (jog) or ride bikes. And, frankly, they look much more delicious to me, too.

Edited by Huntster

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Huntster

This guy appears to be alone. In my opinion, he’s sending the wrong body language messages to this bear. I’m reading the bear’s language as him testing the guy. I wouldn’t play around with this bear, then go to bed there another night. I’v3 been that close to bears, both black and grizzly, but I was either safe in a tree, or I sent them packing, and I was well armed every time with a legal license and tag in my possession.

 

 

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RedHawk454
1 hour ago, Huntster said:

Cougars love women, especially those that run (jog) or ride bikes. And, frankly, they look much more delicious to me, too.

 

 

Im more afraid of cougar attacks than bear attacks.  I run in the mountains and I refuse to run in the mountains when it’s dark  out even if I have proper illumination equipment and a push knife when I do run but it’s always in the day time.

 

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SWWASAS

Is that soft on the outside with a crunchy center Hunster?     The other factor that I think is significant is that once you know what to listen for, you can hear BF moving around unless you are in camp and it has a lot of time to pick its way in in super stealth mode.      The cougar that jumped me had been following me on a mountain bike and I heard absolutely nothing before it finally jumped out in front of me.   I think if I had not been wearing a pack that covered my neck,   it might have tried to get me from behind.  

Edited by SWWASAS

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Huntster
7 minutes ago, SWWASAS said:

Is that soft on the outside with a crunchy center Hunster?.......

 

I like ‘em soft throughout and plenty juicy! 👍

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Trogluddite
22 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

You can join a SAR group

And help bring comfort to those whose loved ones are missing.  A story on this site about a missing toddler out west led me to track down a local group (which was not as easy as one would think) and join.  I've been on several searches since then and even if we don't find the missing person, the family appreciates the effort is made.

 

As to learning skills that give you confidence, at one meeting we practiced splinting.  The next month when I was hiking w/my wife in the 'Dacks, I fell and badly fractured my arm.  We splinted it and, with the moral support and help of another couple who ran into us as we we're getting ready to move, hiked out 2 miles (okay, a little less - the distance gets longer every time I tell the story). 

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