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RedHawk454

How dangerous is it to be BiGFooting alone?

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Catmandoo

^^^^^ I think that it is 'organ donor' from the shoulders down. The rest are easy to get to or do they call it 'harvest'. Their friends say that they died doing what they love............face plant into terrain?

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Incorrigible1

Right up there with those intrepid (?) braver souls than me that lace helium weather balloons to lawn chairs.

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Catmandoo

^^^^ The 1st was "Lawn chair Larry".  What do you think the flight deck was like when the passenger jet called the tower to report a lawn chair?  He did not get the fame he expected and committed suicide.

Edited by Catmandoo
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wiiawiwb

Everyone should agree that going out into nature, particularly alone, has some element of danger. As has been pointed out in this thread, people die in a myriad of ways. Falling off cliffs, predation from animals, exposure, illegal human activities,  drowning, and many more.  The Missing 411 books present cases where authorities have investigated the disappearance using CSI protocols and their efforts have not produced evidence to explain the disappearance.

 

The Missing 411 cases have already exhausted the time, energy, and resources of conventional law enforcement and SAR efforts.  They've been thoroughly investigated and no rationale explanation exists for the disappearances. Something obviously happened to these people in these cases but no one can explain how or what . Could some of these people have intentionally gone missing? Let's not forget authorities and family members have already been down this road to no avail. Undoubtedly, there may be some but that is nothing more than a guess as to who and how many.

 

Intentionally going missing is not what happened in the case I've used as an example.  In the end, we're left to collectively scratch our heads and say there are some things out there beyond our knowledge and defy rational explanation.  If a disappearance can happen to one person while out hunting in a party of six, leaving not a single shred of evidence, it can happen more easily to one person out alone or even with another.  Praemonitus, praemunitus...To be forewarned is to be forearmed.

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SWWASAS
15 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

^^^^ SWWASAS. I have a few questions about your flying. What color is your plane? I am just curious about visibility.  What do you wear as in warmth?

 

As a side bar here, I have been wondering about the wing-suit guy who disappeared in the Mount Si area on Jan. 3, 2013. His wing-suit was brown and green. His parachute was blue. He was supposed to jump out of a helicopter at 6,500 feet. First week of January, lightly dressed, with snow and rain. His group had a designated landing area. Neither the pilot nor the observers on the ground actually saw Kurt Ruppert Jr. exit the helicopter nor his path thereafter. They had modified wing-suits  for triple free-fall time. 

Human remains were found in the Mt.Si area on Jun 6, 2015. The remains are from an unknown hiker with death about the mid 90's. Around 20 years to find skeletal remains.

 

Squirrel suit gliders are an interesting study. The "Wing Suit Community" has earned the nickname "Organ Donor Community".

My aircraft is white.     The airplane is high wing so the downward visibility is about as good as it gets.     It has a heater so winter flying is not a problem.     Why do you ask? 

15 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

^^^^^ I think that it is 'organ donor' from the shoulders down. The rest are easy to get to or do they call it 'harvest'. Their friends say that they died doing what they love............face plant into terrain?

When I was an ambulance attendant picked up a person whose parachute did not open.    I think most of his major bones were broken in at least one place.    It was sort of like picking up a dummy shaped sack full of bones.    Very limp.   He was of course very dead.   

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Catmandoo
1 hour ago, SWWASAS said:

My aircraft is white.     The airplane is high wing so the downward visibility is about as good as it gets.     It has a heater so winter flying is not a problem.     Why do you ask? 

 

Visibility  of the plane while on the ground. I was wondering  if it is red or yellow for high vis. Years ago, I was in Prince William Sound, Alaska, for Herring. I was able to ride in a spotting plane, a Cessna 180 with floats. It was painted black. I challenged the owner/operator on the paint scheme. His answer was 'just watch'. It would snow at night. At sunrise, his plane was the first to dump snow off of the wings, unaided. Clever, but if he ever went down, the aircraft would have been difficult to impossible to find. That Cessna 180 was nice.  During a flight, I asked him how many G's his plane could take.  Wrong question. He rolled it into a dive. Question answered.

 

For flying clothes, I was curious if you have a special aviator 'onesie' that is warm, waterproof, windproof and different from the clothing the rest of us find at sporting goods stores.

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SWWASAS
20 minutes ago, Catmandoo said:

 

Visibility  of the plane while on the ground. I was wondering  if it is red or yellow for high vis. Years ago, I was in Prince William Sound, Alaska, for Herring. I was able to ride in a spotting plane, a Cessna 180 with floats. It was painted black. I challenged the owner/operator on the paint scheme. His answer was 'just watch'. It would snow at night. At sunrise, his plane was the first to dump snow off of the wings, unaided. Clever, but if he ever went down, the aircraft would have been difficult to impossible to find. That Cessna 180 was nice.  During a flight, I asked him how many G's his plane could take.  Wrong question. He rolled it into a dive. Question answered.

 

For flying clothes, I was curious if you have a special aviator 'onesie' that is warm, waterproof, windproof and different from the clothing the rest of us find at sporting goods stores.

The heater is quite capable in the PNW.     Might not be in Minnesota in the winter.     However when you fly light aircraft over mountains you need to have survival gear that allows you to survive night time temperatures should you survive going down.   Straining airplanes though the trees is not a good thing.  Fortunately my aircraft has a good survival history when people have gone into the trees.     There is a steel cage that surrounds the pilot and passenger which the wings and motor attaches to.      Makes for good protection going through trees that would rip apart all aluminum aircraft.  

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Huntster
3 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

.........When I was an ambulance attendant picked up a person whose parachute did not open.    I think most of his major bones were broken in at least one place.    It was sort of like picking up a dummy shaped sack full of bones.    Very limp.   He was of course very dead.   

 

“Very dead” sounds definitive.........

 

 

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RedHawk454
2 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

The heater is quite capable in the PNW.     Might not be in Minnesota in the winter.     However when you fly light aircraft over mountains you need to have survival gear that allows you to survive night time temperatures should you survive going down.   Straining airplanes though the trees is not a good thing.  Fortunately my aircraft has a good survival history when people have gone into the trees.     There is a steel cage that surrounds the pilot and passenger which the wings and motor attaches to.      Makes for good protection going through trees that would rip apart all aluminum aircraft.  

 

What kindof plane do you fly?

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Explorer

This lady went backpacking/camping alone in Maine's AT and died.

 

https://www.pressherald.com/2016/05/25/report-geraldine-largay-kept-journal-during-weeks-lost-in-maine-woods/

 

It is a sad story; she was not properly prepared or trained (no compass, GPS, or PLD).  She did have a conventional cell phone, but that does not help in the wilderness (specially one without GPS and maps).

 

There is no Bigfoot in this story, but if you read the article to the end, you will find that during the time that she went missing and until they found her body  (over 2 years later) there were all sorts of speculations including the "BF took her" idea.

 

Wonder if her body and notes were not found, whether this would be another of the 411 cases of mysterious disappearances?

 

She died inside her tent about 2 miles away from the Appalachian Trail.  

 

LargayMissingMap.0516

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wiiawiwb

Probably so.  Also in Maine, Robert Smith went missing back in 1997 and they never found a trace of evidence of him. His case is very much akin to the Messick case in the Adirondacks I referenced a few posts above. Both men were elderly, had a disability, a rifle/shotgun, were lifelong hunters, others knew where they were, etcetera.  How do hundreds of search and rescue not find a long gun, an article of clothing,  their two-way radio? How do bloodhounds fail to pick up their scent?

 

What happened to these people? I don't know but it's as though they were quickly and cleanly lifted up from where they were to the sky above along with their clothing, guns, equipment, and all.  It's the only explanation I can offer that begins to fit some of the puzzle pieces together.  If anyone has another explanation for these two cases, I'd like to hear it.

Edited by wiiawiwb

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Bigjeepman
On 12/28/2018 at 5:42 AM, wiiawiwb said:

Everyone should agree that going out into nature, particularly alone, has some element of danger. As has been pointed out in this thread, people die in a myriad of ways. Falling off cliffs, predation from animals, exposure, illegal human activities,  drowning, and many more.  The Missing 411 books present cases where authorities have investigated the disappearance using CSI protocols and their efforts have not produced evidence to explain the disappearance.

 

The Missing 411 cases have already exhausted the time, energy, and resources of conventional law enforcement and SAR efforts.  They've been thoroughly investigated and no rationale explanation exists for the disappearances. Something obviously happened to these people in these cases but no one can explain how or what . Could some of these people have intentionally gone missing? Let's not forget authorities and family members have already been down this road to no avail. Undoubtedly, there may be some but that is nothing more than a guess as to who and how many.

 

Intentionally going missing is not what happened in the case I've used as an example.  In the end, we're left to collectively scratch our heads and say there are some things out there beyond our knowledge and defy rational explanation.  If a disappearance can happen to one person while out hunting in a party of six, leaving not a single shred of evidence, it can happen more easily to one person out alone or even with another.  Praemonitus, praemunitus...To be forewarned is to be forearmed.

I had never heard about the missing people in national parks until the other day, I watched a show called vanished.  The guy who wrote 411 had some strange reports of people just vanishing.  The number of people who go missing and are never found was huge. 

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