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Thermal Imagers In Bigfoot Country


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On 8/25/2019 at 9:32 AM, SWWASAS said:

I have never heard of anyone pounding a stake in the ground where they have taken a video or a picture.     If that was done, I might have more faith in the results of the reenactment.    The exact camera location is critical to determine anything from sight angles.      

 

True.

Cheap tent stakes do not take up a lot of room and don't weigh much. Difficult to put into the ground in rocky areas.

Marking camera location, foot prints, trackways or other locations of interest is not difficult.  The slotted heads receive the hooked tab on the end of a tape measure or signage to distinguish event locations or send special messages.

There are about 3 colors of tent stakes available. Color coding can help delineate left-right tracks in a trackway / large  and small tracks in close proximity.

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Edited by Catmandoo
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2 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

True.

Cheap tent stakes do not take up a lot of room and don't weigh much. Difficult to put into the ground in rocky areas.

Marking camera location, foot prints, trackways or other locations of interest is not difficult.  The slotted heads receive the hooked tab on the end of a tape measure or signage to distinguish event locations or send special messages.

There are about 3 colors of tent stakes available. Color coding can help delineate left-right tracks in a trackway / large  and small tracks in close proximity.

 

 

Stakes are an excellent idea especially the neon ones. I use reflecting tacks and/or tape. The tacks are easy and very small and I'm usually next to a tree to begin with.  If not, the tape is used to attach to weeds, a branch or around a rock. That way I can find the location at night if I have to mark it better for another day.

 

Reflecting Tacks

 

Reflecting tape

 

 

 

 

 

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You have been to the mountain and see the light!   Surely you should be worshiped by your own kind!    Solo is is very difficult to measure much without some sort of stake!  Meldrum in a casting seminar presented the science behind documentation of tracks.      Most peoples footprint pictures rarely have anything in them but their own boots.     Take pictures from 4 different directions to get the context and lay of the land where the tracks were put down.    Then measure like crazy before you disturb the tracks.   Stride,  footprint width and length.  Use measuring devices you can see the markings in the pictures.   Numbers like you have can define each print in a trackway.    A metal tape measure normally does not have the markings visible due to reflection.    Cloth or fiberglass tape is more visible.    When you have done everything you can think of as far as documentation, cast the prints.    Casting often destroys them completely or covers up details.    My first footprint find lasted a whole 20 minutes before it was destroyed by a group of 4 hikers.    Guard it until documentation is complete. 

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Ladies and Gentlemen, if I may be so offensive to inform you, photography of any variety simply isn't going to pass muster. Unless it's chemical film showing a 9' tall male ripping a tree out of the ground and hurling it a hundred yards or so, it's just another meaningless video. Of course, it can provide something to argue about with the peanut gallery, but there's already plenty of that. If the night vision aids one in shooting a sasquatch or tracking one back to its lair, that's scientific progress. 

 

Of course, I'd love to have a good quality night vision setup, especially on a rifle scope, but sasquatchery is just the beginning of the reasons why, and unless I shoot the thing, it's just sasquatch tourism...........which works for me, but I have plenty of toys on my list way ahead of night vision equipment. Alaska prohibits hunting with such technology, so I have little need for it.

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6 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

If not, the tape is used to attach to weeds, a branch or around a rock.

 

Forestry Supplies has about 9 colors in vinyl flagging tape and 5 colors in bio-degradeable tape.  I carry a lot of red and some yellow. Red has a dual purpose. If you find yourself in trouble while in the boondocks, leave a trail of red tape. Season, ground cover and weather permitting, the red 'line' is easier to see than a red dot.

Flagging tape is available in pink so girls can mark their way in the manner they see fit. They see things differently.

 

3 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

 Cloth or fiberglass tape is more visible.

 

Also, a metal tape is not compliant to terrain and slope and the case falls over.

 

1 hour ago, Huntster said:

Ladies and Gentlemen, if I may be so offensive to inform you, photography of any variety simply isn't going to pass muster. Unless it's chemical film showing a 9' tall male ripping a tree out of the ground and hurling it a hundred yards or so, it's just another meaningless video.

 

Go ahead and try to hurt my feeling. I have one remaining and it is difficult to get to. There is a lot of Kodakery to be had.   How about Kodak Vision3 500T ( 500 ASA tungsten ), add a #85 filter for daylight exposure and the ASA is about 320. I say about because light in a forest is complicated and dealing with the shift in color temperature under the canopy may eat up a few stops ( choose your flavor; F stop or T stop ). Shoot 24 frames per second for digital processing. Audio would be possible. The result is a film record and a digital version = meaningful film footage.  Kodak Vision3 500T is available in 16mm and Super8.

 

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5 hours ago, Huntster said:

Ladies and Gentlemen, if I may be so offensive to inform you, photography of any variety simply isn't going to pass muster. Unless it's chemical film showing a 9' tall male ripping a tree out of the ground and hurling it a hundred yards or so, it's just another meaningless video. Of course, it can provide something to argue about with the peanut gallery, but there's already plenty of that. If the night vision aids one in shooting a sasquatch or tracking one back to its lair, that's scientific progress. 

 

Of course, I'd love to have a good quality night vision setup, especially on a rifle scope, but sasquatchery is just the beginning of the reasons why, and unless I shoot the thing, it's just sasquatch tourism...........which works for me, but I have plenty of toys on my list way ahead of night vision equipment. Alaska prohibits hunting with such technology, so I have little need for it.

 

It will pass muster with me which is all it needs to do. If I "get it", I'll never show the "got it" thermal it to anyone except family and friends. My endeavor places no importance whatsoever to proving it to anyone other than me.  It never has.

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8 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

It will pass muster with me which is all it needs to do.........

 

I bet it doesn't. You'll want a good daytime sighting. I know I would. A thermal device might help me find a great location, and it might even help me follow a creature for a ways, but I want to see details that a thermal image won't provide. Moreover, even a single daytime image would just be a beginning. I guess I'm naturally greedy. I'd want more. An example would be my grizzly bear observations in the wilds. Each one has been a treasure, and I always yearn for more of them.

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I agree that a day-time sighting is what we all seek for several reasons, not the least is what does the darn thing look like.  I'll settle for a thermal of an upright bipedal at night in a remote area where a human has no business being.

 

The other thing a thermal at night helps with is whether there is noise commensurate with the action being viewed through the thermal.  If the upright bipedal really is a human and you approach it using a thermal,  the blackness-of-night retreat is going to be noisy unless a flashlight is used . That will be easily seen and confirm it was a human.  Where I go, there is a lot of deadfall, tree litter, and underbrush that will make noise. On the other hand, I would expect a sasquatch to be relatively quiet, if not silent, in its retreat.

 

 

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7 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

I agree that a day-time sighting is what we all seek for several reasons, not the least is what does the darn thing look like.  I'll settle for a thermal of an upright bipedal at night in a remote area where a human has no business being.

 

The other thing a thermal at night helps with is whether there is noise commensurate with the action being viewed through the thermal.  If the upright bipedal really is a human and you approach it using a thermal,  the blackness-of-night retreat is going to be noisy unless a flashlight is used . That will be easily seen and confirm it was a human.  Where I go, there is a lot of deadfall, tree litter, and underbrush that will make noise. On the other hand, I would expect a sasquatch to be relatively quiet, if not silent, in its retreat.

 

I agree on the day sighting photo.    The artists renditions are all over the place on what an adult BF looks like.    I would feel more comfortable if another good day photo or video corroborated the P/G film.    If two pictures taken 50  years apart show basically the same thing we are looking at the same species or the same master costume maker.  The longer the interval between pictures the less likely it is a talented costume maker still making them.     30 year old costume maker in 1967 would be over 80 now.    If we can believe the artists renditions are accurate,  we must have more than one species.    

 

I disagree about the withdrawal of a BF being quieter than human.    I based that on my encounter in which two adult BF were unaware that I was present.    The best representation of how one of them sounded approaching me through the woods was the scene in the original Jurassic Park movie in which the T Rex was approaching in the woods.    They do not slip into the quiet mode unless they know a human is present and they want to move with stealth.   If discovered or  if they think a human is not present they have no reason to be quiet.    If you try to flush one, by approaching they make noise, moving.   In another encounter when I was trying to get one to break cover, I not only heard it moving away,  but it finally growled when it got tired of the game.    They are a very large biped moving through the down wood and make an incredible amount of noise breaking things and producing heavy thuds at each footfall.   I wish to heavens that my recorder got into record mode and you all would know what I am saying.    Numerous reports of BF trying to escort humans out of an area or paralleling humans on a trail mention they produce a lot of noise when they choose to.  

Edited by SWWASAS
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