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wiiawiwb
7 hours ago, ShadowBorn said:

Rather visualize the map in your head just carry the map with you. Water proof the map and keep it close on you so if you were to loose your pack in a panic you still have your map and a compass. If you know the features on your map then you should be able to navigate from point A to point B.

 

What happen to me out in my area was that i was walking to point A to point B. In others words I was heading west to this this small pond out in the middle of the woods between two trails.  No problem right ! Well that is not what happen to me. Instead I some how started heading east towards the swamp. The problem is that I am not sure how it even happened. If I did not have a map or my compass I would of been lost wondering those woods trying to find my way out. My GPS did not even work which made it even worst. I have been boggled by this since then.  It was scary.

 

Trail001.thumb.png.28f76ec84efcf615e71858e9904c73e1.png

 

Why anyone would hike anywhere without an actual map in their possession is beyond me.  They're far more important than a compass. To quote an old American Express slogan, "Never leave home without it". Access to purchase color-printed, local and regional USGS topo maps isn't as easy as it once was, but, anyone with a computer can print out topo maps free from home.  Customized ones too thanks to Cal Topo and others.

1 minute ago, wiiawiwb said:

 

 

 

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NatFoot
5 hours ago, JKH said:

Well, not super local! Poor old fella. Isn't anyone already checking it out?

 

I can't judge because I am not a serious BF field researcher but that statement (not yours) doesn't make sense to me.

 

You know of a BF that has a somewhat predictable habit of dumpster diving. You spend large amounts of your weekend in the woods searching. But a three hour drive is too far? 

 

Like I said, hard for me to cast stones because I don't put in nearly the effort that some here do, but if you're wanting to see a BF, get a nice picture, etc.....seems like three hours wouldn't be all that tough.

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SWWASAS
12 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

 

I actually have a local report of an old, gray sasquatch with a limp. It's been seen numbers times dumpster diving. Unfortunately, it's also a 3-hour drive from where I am. I would love to do an overnight and check this one out!

 

 

 

That situation would seem to be a great opportunity if you could befriend the aging BF by feeding it.    It is obviously too old or sick to hunt and is resorting to dumpter diving.      I don't see where feeding a BF in that situation would be in any way detrimental and may extend the life of the creature. 

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Huntster

I was conducting some research with this forums SSR database yesterday. My hunch was correct: ALL the winter reports (Dec-March) in the Sierra Nevada range are west of the range in the foothills. I also noticed a winter hot zone along Hwy 108 through Sonora Pass near Pinecrest and Cold Springs. A series of reports in 1963 was aggressively investigated by the Tuolumne County Sheriff's Department. The reports can be read on the BFRO site.

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Madison5716

 

You know, I'm gonna see what other bigfoot researchers I can find who live in that area.  I'll let you know.  

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Sorry to hear you may need further treatment, but sending wishes for good health. The elder seems like a delicate situation and after thought, I question the value of possibly disturbing its routine for no good reason. I'm sure you know ethical folks who would be caring in their approach, if any. Take care and glad you're doing well.

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Wolfjewel
2 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

It would be a six hour drive there and back total, and however long we stayed there, plus food and gas and miscellaneous, like paying my neighbor to walk the dog three times at $5 each time. 

Madison, I wish I lived near you. I’d walk your dog for free, and pack you and your companions several lunches and snacks to take like fresh banana bread. What I’m really saying is I support your efforts to lead a productive life (work, family, squatching) while dealing with cancer treatments, that are well known to sap your energy. All the best to ya’!

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wiiawiwb

Madison, you're doing a phenomenal job. How you do all the things you do is amazing including being a fantastic mom. All of us would be there to help you if we could. Keep the faith.

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23 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

 

Don't know if anyone local is checking it out.  It came from a friend, who is a counselor, and the client was okay with passing on the story, but nothing else (aka contact info) because of confidentiality issues.  

 

 

I'm a single mom working a part time job with a disabled, mentally ill teenager, multiple animals to care for, a 21 year old truck, who just had a double mastectomy surgery 3 weeks ago for cancer on August 28th, and I'm looking at chemotherapy and/or radiation in the coming weeks. And it wouldn't be a three hour drive.  It would be a six hour drive there and back total, and however long we stayed there, plus food and gas and miscellaneous, like paying my neighbor to walk the dog three times at $5 each time.  I do my best. There's some obstacles to overcome.

 

I just happen to be lucky enough to live in the middle of Bigfoot Central and get to drive an hour and find things.  It's kinda awesome.

 

 

 

 

I wish that I could.  

I just got tired reading all of that  :D

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wiiawiwb
On 9/18/2020 at 9:52 PM, Madison5716 said:

I just happen to be lucky enough to live in the middle of Bigfoot Central and get to drive an hour and find things.  It's kinda awesome.

 

 

It is very awesome!  Being in an area so rich with opportunity allows you to try out new locations more easily.  Similar to drilling for oil...if I miss it on this spot, I can just try again and hit oil over there. 

 

As the number of spots you've been to increases, are there one or two you consider your honey holes? The place you've tucked away in your memory that you'll go that because it has your highest confidence level?

 

I know I do and I work my two spots pretty hard.  Others may prefer to find new locations based on sighting reports or because they've studied the region and know these particular spots offer food, water, and cover better than other areas.

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5 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

As the number of spots you've been to increases, are there one or two you consider your honey holes? The place you've tucked away in your memory that you'll go that because it has your highest confidence level?

 

Speaking for myself, definitely.   However, the best of the best failed this year.   Dunno why, but it was **empty**.  

 

MIB

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