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DaleyWoodbeater

Do the police take squatch reports seriously?

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norseman
On 7/24/2020 at 5:56 PM, BC witness said:

@7.62

The sneaking is going on in the S to N direction these days, with non-US refugees trying to cross into Canada from the US, and US citizens, who claim to be heading to Alaska, winding up in Canadian locations far off the direct route to Alaska, presumably because of our much lower covid infection rate, which is the whole reason the border is closed to casual travel right now!


BC bud gets smuggled the other way too. Boats down the Columbia, Chip trucks and mules with backpacks!

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BC witness

True, norseman, I'd forgotten about one of our major cash crops. The border through the Fraser Valley, near my home, is very heavily monitored with electronics. Under the current closure, many families with relatives on both sides are meeting along Zero Ave., sitting in lawn chairs on opposite sides of the small roadside ditch. As long as they stay on their respective sides they are not hassled, but border agents from both countries are making themselves very visible along that rural corridor.

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Skinwalker13

IMO there are a few who do. We get calls from our local and state PD from time to time informing us of a sighting that was called in. Wheather they believe it or nlt they at least take us seriously enough to give us a shout and let us know specific location. 

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BeansBaxter78

I've been in LE for about 14 years now and I've never had any "training" in how to deal with BF reports. My co-workers that know about my interests think I'm crazy and that I might as well be out looking for Spider-man. It's a fictional character, nothing more.

 

There is a retired Alaska State Trooper who was (is?) a BFRO investigator and got into before he retired from AST. I've heard other troopers say "His cheese slipped off his cracker." When referring to his interest in BF.

 

It is NOT taken seriously by LE here.

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NatFoot
36 minutes ago, BeansBaxter78 said:

I've been in LE for about 14 years now and I've never had any "training" in how to deal with BF reports. My co-workers that know about my interests think I'm crazy and that I might as well be out looking for Spider-man. It's a fictional character, nothing more.

 

There is a retired Alaska State Trooper who was (is?) a BFRO investigator and got into before he retired from AST. I've heard other troopers say "His cheese slipped off his cracker." When referring to his interest in BF.

 

It is NOT taken seriously by LE here.

 

Here as in Alaska?

 

That is pretty telling if so.

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Huntster
48 minutes ago, NatFoot said:

Here as in Alaska?

 

That is pretty telling if so.


My limited experience with both law enforcement and ADFG personnel in Alaska is that they don't take it seriously, but that might not be so true in prime Alaskan bigfoot habitat at the very south end of southeast Alaska. I would really like to talk to Area Biologists from GMUs 1 & 2, espcially if they spent as many as 10 years on duty in those units.

 

An interesting bigfoot event occured at the village of Illiamna (southwest Alaska) in the early spring of 1977. An FAA employee had a huge sasquatch cross the road in front of him, and the story got published in an Anchorage newspaper. The employee caught some harassment, so challenged "the experts" (most of whom were hunting and fishing guides) to come see for themselves. Several did. They followed tracks until they lost the trail, and interviewed the natives, who matter-of-fact told them that the creatures had been there all along, and they just left them be, despite the creatures stealing drying salmon on occasion and pulling their clothes off the line every once in a while.

 

One guide who scoffed at first (Jim Repine) had a change of heart after going out there.......

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BeansBaxter78

Last year while filming the Alaska Triangle, we had a AST patrol boat approach us in Port Chatham. They advised the captain of our chartered boat they wanted to board and check everyone's hunting license.

 

The captain told them, no one was hunting and that we were filming a TV show about Bigfoot and that no one had a license. I was not on deck for this exchange but I understand it was literally a several minute conversation that was like an endless loop.

 

Trooper: "We just want to check everyone's license."

 

Captain: "Okay...but no one has one. We are filming a show. There is a film crew and some Bigfoot researchers on board. No hunting clients."

 

Trooper: "We want to check their hunting licenses."

 

Finally, the trooper "got" it and said they would leave us alone and they puttered off. Now granted, I'm sure they have heard a lot of excuses but from what I gathered, when he was told we were filming a show, he didn't even react, just kept asking for licenses.

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ShadowBorn

So guess if you are planning go out exploring in Alaska . Be prepared to be asked if you get stopped by the Ast patrol and that it is if you have guns on board . Never have had that problem yet in Michigan and still not sure what the DNR might say if they ever did see me with my pistol on me. I have asked some state troopers though and their response has always been to just shrug it off and laugh about it. So i never asked them again. There are not that many DNR officers in the state of Michigan and there really should be with the poaching I have seen and have reported. But hope fully they do catch these poachers or else they could be the big guys doing the killing . Which stands to reason for them ( the DNR ) to stay silent about what really goes on on. I would say the same about the police and their silence . Unless you are ver tight with them then there is no info from them. The thing that also gets me is I just do not feel like being laughed at about asking them about Bigfoot sightings.

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VAfooter
2 hours ago, BeansBaxter78 said:

They advised the captain of our chartered boat they wanted to board and check everyone's hunting license.

 

Just curious, did you have guns aboard?

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BeansBaxter78
15 minutes ago, VAfooter said:

 

Just curious, did you have guns aboard?

Of course, it's Alaska.

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PNWexplorer
5 hours ago, BeansBaxter78 said:

Of course, it's Alaska.

Yep.  Not illegal to have a gun in the woods without a hunting licence.  DNR officers are the worst.  They typically have horrible attitudes and like to throw their weight around.  Was discussing this with some retired LEOs the other night and all agreed that wildlife officers are generally overzealous and have bad attitudes.

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VAfooter
14 hours ago, BeansBaxter78 said:

Of course, it's Alaska.

 

Figured as much.... :lol:

 

Glad the AST did not want to be a jerk about it and search the vessel or something.

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SWWASAS
On 8/1/2020 at 2:14 PM, BeansBaxter78 said:

Last year while filming the Alaska Triangle, we had a AST patrol boat approach us in Port Chatham. They advised the captain of our chartered boat they wanted to board and check everyone's hunting license.

 

The captain told them, no one was hunting and that we were filming a TV show about Bigfoot and that no one had a license. I was not on deck for this exchange but I understand it was literally a several minute conversation that was like an endless loop.

 

Trooper: "We just want to check everyone's license."

 

Captain: "Okay...but no one has one. We are filming a show. There is a film crew and some Bigfoot researchers on board. No hunting clients."

 

Trooper: "We want to check their hunting licenses."

 

Finally, the trooper "got" it and said they would leave us alone and they puttered off. Now granted, I'm sure they have heard a lot of excuses but from what I gathered, when he was told we were filming a show, he didn't even react, just kept asking for licenses.

That makes no sense unless they thought that bigfoot research included shooting BF.   Just the concept that guns are only for hunting is not constitutional.  Someone should have explained to the AST that the constitution supports gun ownership to protect citizens against a stupid overreaching government.  

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NatFoot
6 minutes ago, SWWASAS said:

That makes no sense unless they thought that bigfoot research included shooting BF.   Just the concept that guns are only for hunting is not constitutional.  Someone should have explained to the AST that the constitution supports gun ownership to protect citizens against a stupid overreaching government.  

 

Or they could have handled it just like they did and not antagonized LEOs and then went on their way after a civilized conversation and understanding.

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