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Guest MrMudder

Maps: Correlation Between Missing Persons & Sasquatch

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Woodswalker, that is a cool legend. I'd go with you but I'm pretty far away... I love caves.

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BobbyO
SSR Team

Bobby,

Here's where I got that #

http://wiki.answers...._Park_each_year

Didn't like the outcome but some of the greatest golf ever played congrats for sure!!!

Cool, but this is from the NPS - http://www.nps.gov/yose/naturescience/park-statistics.htm

Incredibly high numbers and i wasn't aware it was so many people to be honest and only looked in the first place as i thought you were initially too high.

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Guest Cervelo

I saw that to after you brought it up and some more googling.....it's an astounding number but it's a big place!

Yellowstone if you haven't been folks go go go!!

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kbhunter

Yellowstone is definitely on my bucket list. :thumbsu:

KB

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VAfooter
Moderator

Like I say you have a better chance of catching Hanta virus in an AT shelter, near a PCT High Sierra campsite or AMC tent platform than you do losing to a homicidal/fratricidal BF kidnapper.

True! But even if the odds are 10,000,000 to 1, if you are the "one", then it suddenly becomes a very big deal and very personal.

If it does happen (and we have no concrete proof that it does although it does seem within the realm of possibility and there are anecdotal stories), it most likely is exceedingly rare. Certainly not something to worry about. There are more prevalent dangers out there.

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Guest

I think it instructive that the First Nations people, who have had far longer personal experience with these creatures, going back well before the coming of the Eurpoeans I might add, nearly always have a level of fear regarding them. Even the tribes who venerate them spiritually tend to say that they're best left alone and not to go seeking them.

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georgerm

Someone posted a report of BFF of their family picking blackberries, and their grandmother disappeared. Several months later she came wandering back to the village starving and exhausted. She said a BF took her for a pet, but she refused to eat the rabbits it offered. It must have let her go home, and she died shorty after.

This causes me to theorize that BF kidnaps humans as companions or pets. Many aductees probably don't survive the rigors of BF life and die from illnesses, hypothermia, or starvation. Some are taken to remote areas with no roads, high cliffs, and the kidnapee simply can't escape or dies from the elements if escapes are attempted.

If we recall the story of Albert Ostman who was kidnapped in 1924 by a big male bigfoot, and he felt more like a pet as he sat among the BF family. The big female was not amused, and seemed really irritated with her mate for bringing back a human pet.

Bigfoot seems to have saved more people than we have documents of fatal encounters. One report on BFF was of a young rafter who nearly drowned, BF pulled him from the river, and kept him in a den until he recovered.

Edited by georgerm

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Guest

I want to read this book but I know it would just terrify me too much...some may be bf related, but for sure the handy work of some serial killers as well.

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georgerm
name='Mulder' timestamp='1349143397' post='636582']

I think it instructive that the First Nations people, who have had far longer personal experience with these creatures, going back well before the coming of the Eurpoeans I might add, nearly always have a level of fear regarding them. Even the tribes who venerate them spiritually tend to say that they're best left alone and not to go seeking them.

[/b]

Over the last 12,000 years Native Americans inhabited North America along with BF, and we have a few recent stories but not the whole picture. I wonder if the Native Americans pushed BF away, since if BF prowled too close, it went running home with stinging arrows in its rear end! BF may have done some kidnapping as a form of revenge.

Were there time when BF and NA got along and even hung out together?

Why should BF trust us now and want to treat us with respect when we shoot at them and plow roads through their backyards. Why not chase humans and act like a devil when they have been pushed around?

Edited by georgerm

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Guest

My hypothesis is that Bigfoot got here first. They covered ground and expanded out much faster than man. We pushed them out. Their nature of non violence for the most part shows, that it is possible they were too peaceful and let the human numbers grow too large. The bigfoot feared no native bow. They are nothing like our modern bows. The native spear was hardly better.

I would further hypothesize that BF rules the night and humans rule the day when their habitats overlapped. The relationship the native peoples of California and their cultural viewpoint on the animal shows inter species competition for resources or a lack thereof. In areas that could experience large fluctuations in available food you get natives that view BF as an animal to fear as a predator. While other tribes see it as a trickster and or reclusive and and non confrontational.

The Miwuk and the acorn are a great example. The acorn in this area is as corn was to others. It was a staple. Many of the animals the natives coexisted with and depended upon ate them as well. Drought especially extended ones can vastly reduce the acorn crop. Our deer population is a great measure of this. Good years will see twin and triplet fawns. The Miwuk tell of them as children thieves (cannibal) and acorn meal thieves. Get this they say that BF would be drawn in by the sound of Miwuk women pounding acorn mean in their mortar rocks. BF would patiently wait till after they had finished grinding and washing. When they finished and set it to dry, the BF with great stealth would swoop in and gobble it up. Leaving only tracks or feces behind. When there wasn't enough animals that the acorn boom supports there are hard times. Natives were predated upon to some degree and that viewpoint became the Miwuk view of the animal.

The Hoopa consider them mischievous and mildly dangerous. They have a long interaction with the animal and a cultural viewpoint different than the Miwuk. Their stories are of stolen fish/berries and tricks played on hunters and children. Not being eaten. The food sources from the area are more diverse and numerous. With several major caloric blooms due to salmon runs and berry crops. There was never a source of environmental stress great enough that led the BF to compete/predate upon them.

So BF could can eat you if it wants/needs to. More likely it would just wait and steal your num nums than your life =)

Edited by Woodswalker

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georgerm

Well put and I guess we could say the animal world is one of take care of your own, make a few animal friends in the wild but protect your people and food supply. Make treaties with other tribes and sharing the food supply is wiser than war. Many times it doesn't work out this way.

If you shoot a BF with a stone tipped arrow as it takes some acorn mash expect what? BF wanders home only to develop a slow killing infection as the arrow festers? Could we expect BF's kin to kidnap a few humans in revenge after watching this gruesome death? Is BF really the bad and scary creature walking the woods?

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Guest BastetsCat

I think it instructive that the First Nations people, who have had far longer personal experience with these creatures, going back well before the coming of the Eurpoeans I might add, nearly always have a level of fear regarding them. Even the tribes who venerate them spiritually tend to say that they're best left alone and not to go seeking them.

Reminds me of a Canadian story that I read years ago. I think that someone was traveling with a family of indians in a buckboard (horse drawn) and it was inplied that they saw a BF type creature that the Indians immediatley named. The Indians then demanded that the children hide in the buckboard and covered them with belongings like blankets or something. The parents refused to let the children come out until they reached their destination. They told the person that was with them that the BF steal children. If they see that you have children they will follow you so that they can steal them or something along those lines.

The story had something to do with the names. Windigo came up and so did the French Rugaru.

In my experience mostly with the Navajo it is a different thing than a BF. Though they believe in a BF type thing as a water spirit that lives near water. There is an interview with Leonard Dan about skinwalkers where he talks a little about BF...think it was done by Biscardi....Leonard Dan is a prominent figure in the Navajo nations though.

My son did a lot of camping in the same regions of the tribal lands between New Mexico and Arizona with his school and got lots of attention because I made him promise to cleanse the areas that they were to sleep in. The one camp area had a hogan and the custodian of the campground was very pleased that my son had brought cedar to burn... he opened up and talked to my son about both skinwalkers and BF. Scared the boogers right out of all of the kids and the teachers while he joked with my son.

There is great 'fear' and respect from most all of the tribes for them.

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Guest

BastetsCat, Sounds like good solid advice from the Indians.

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Guest icicle

I think this may be the map you are referring to. IMO, the locations shown on this map do correlate with sasquatch sightings in the PNW, especially the areas in Washington, Oregon, Northern California and Idaho.

Well, The one area I know well, sort of, for bigfoot reports is just southwest of Atlanta, and it correlates with a big orange blob on the map. That can't be good :/

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BobbyO
SSR Team

My hypothesis is that Bigfoot got here first. They covered ground and expanded out much faster than man. We pushed them out. Their nature of non violence for the most part shows, that it is possible they were too peaceful and let the human numbers grow too large. The bigfoot feared no native bow. They are nothing like our modern bows. The native spear was hardly better.

Got to North America before the Native people did do you mean ?

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