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norseman

The Kill Club

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norseman

Norseman(and friends), good luck with your efforts. You sound as though you've got the focused mindset to take the shot should it present itself.

Since joining this forum I've been a bit disappointed about how quick and easy some folks jump to the conclusion that if you can't explain movement or sounds in the forest it must be a bigfoot. In fact I think the default belief that "it has to be bigfoot" undermines all the legitimate investigative efforts made by others. I enjoy reading the stories, but I'm on the fence about their existence, a firsthand conversation with an eye witness might help persuade me, a body would seal the deal!

A hunter must discern what is his prey and what is not. Sounds simple. But my state has three species of deer, antler point restrictions, sex restrictions and those species overlap. Good observation is key.........and it's expected otherwise the hunter may find himself with fines, jail time and a loss of hunting rights.

So I don't agree with the argument that people are crummy witnesses, we are not. But some one who doesn't spend much time in the outdoors hears what they want to hear and see what they want to see. In fact I've watched videos of tracks, sign and listened to audio of calls, that are simply mind boggling. Not only does the media in question have no value for hunting a unknown creature? They actually have nothing to do with nothing. A forest divot isn't a fresh track for sure.......but was it ever a bigfoot track? No probably not. It's more likely a squirrel hole that has sluffed in with dirt and forest duff.

It's good to be skeptical, but there is enough explainable stuff out there that warrants a no BS expedition with the sole goal of PROVING it's existence once and for all.

Norseman and others...

Just read through the entire thing, GREAT thread and certainly a subject that many of us have considered, even if we will not admit it.

Here is just a little input, nothing earth-shaking:

Urine; a 20 oz plastic soda bottle or similar will get you through a few times and it will contain the odor, assuming you can aim.

Radios; yes have the roger beeps off, use ear pieces and whenever possible use only clicks. Keep actual conversation to a minimum. Really only a single team member needs a radio. It's good to have people only listening to the woods.

Teams; multiple smaller teams would cover more ground like you said... but make no mistake, they will be aware of your presence as soon as you enter their woods. There has been some level of success keeping some attractant at the base camp like music, people laughing/joking, etc. If you can have multiple teams roam the surrounding area and still be able to monitor the camp for a farther vantage point, you may have some luck... You may already be familiar with Bart Cutino's recent success in getting thermal footage (about 5 minutes) of a couple of squatches watching the base camp from about 50 yds away. The TBRC has stated a few times that they seem to have a hard time tracking multiple targets at the same time.

Weapons; The small teams in Viet Nam carried specialized weapons. Meaning one guy might have a shotgun, the other an AR-15, etc.... I'd opt for a mix of weapons as well. I'd think a 2 man team may wanna go with an automatic shotgun and large caliber rifle, possibly a reasonable sidearm as well. I also sold my SW 500 as a felt like a was carrying a brick around with me all the time.

Camera; I'd vote for packing in GoPros and then mount them and turn em on only if you score a kill, to document the process after the kill (and maybe to film you getting attacked by his friends).

My vote would be to collect the parts desired with as much backup as possible and then hall it out of there to Meldrum AND OTHERS, not all eggs in any particular basket.

Hope some of this might be helpful... I really wish I lived a little closer..

CG

Good post, thanks for the imput. Very interesting about their behavior of lacking tracking multiple targets.

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Guest

LOL Pam most wild animals have no desire to eat you and will avoid contact with you at all cost. Just be careful in the late spring when the young are born they will protect them at all costs regardless of the species

Yeah, if it's gonna happen, it'll happen to me. AND thanks for the tip about late spring. I'll steer clear of squirrels now, too.

Oh, who am I trying to impress....I already steer clear of squirrels.

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thermalman
:popcorn: See pam run........see squirrel chase pam.........lol Edited by thermalman

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Guest

LOL Yes, thermalman, I would run. I've even been chased by a common housecat. And I ran.

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norseman

LOL Yes, thermalman, I would run. I've even been chased by a common housecat. And I ran.

Got to love a pioneering woman!

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BobbyO
SSR Team

Teams; multiple smaller teams would cover more ground like you said... but make no mistake, they will be aware of your presence as soon as you enter their woods. There has been some level of success keeping some attractant at the base camp like music, people laughing/joking, etc. If you can have multiple teams roam the surrounding area and still be able to monitor the camp for a farther vantage point, you may have some luck... You may already be familiar with Bart Cutino's recent success in getting thermal footage (about 5 minutes) of a couple of squatches watching the base camp from about 50 yds away. The TBRC has stated a few times that they seem to have a hard time tracking multiple targets at the same time.

Plus 1 from me TT and i so strongly agree with this part.

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Guest

Norseman, you work only a couple hours west of me. Pro-Kill here, but ND is about as unlikely a place to do it as there is. Maybe up in the Pembina Gorge or out in the Missouri River Breaks...

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DWA

LOL Yes, thermalman, I would run. I've even been chased by a common housecat. And I ran.

Hey, I was attacked by turkeys, man. Turkeys. Two of 'em. I ran too. Now, to salve my ego I chased them back....then they chased me....then I chased them....finally I got close enough to my car. The spurs on those legs are no foolin'.

Did I say this was just off a roadway, jammed with traffic? Did I say that I took special care not to look at the faces in those cars...?

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ChrisBFRPKY

Norseman,

If you're going to do the deed, look into a big game caliber like a 416 Rigby, have a 500 SW pistol on one hip and a hatchet and folding limb saw on the other hip. If you knock one down make sure you use the 500 SW when you get close enough and put at least 3 in the chest center mass. Try not to mess up the face or the head.

Then, take out the hatchet and saw and remove the head to carry out with you. Don't make the mistake of killing one, then leaving the body to go get the team together to get it out of the woods. When you return, the body will be gone. It's happened before. At least you can carry the head out on the first trip then recover the rest later. If the rest is gone when you return, well at least you have the head and your goal is still achieved. After all, how can anyone deny a head?

My thoughts would be to have a team of 2 during your hunt. If you are by yourself and you kill one, it's my belief you'll have an extra tough time from the others on your way out. (that has happened before too) So two can be better prepared for the angry individuals you will encounter after killing one of their group. Shoot in relays while the other reloads. I wouldn't split up and let one guy stay with the body while the other goes for help, remember the Bauman story? Some people think the Bigfoot creatures are loners but I don't think so. I believe they live in family groups. So, if you kill the teenager, expect no quarter from Mom and Pop. I guess what I'm saying is be prepared to shoot 2 or 3 if you plan on making it out alive. Mark my words, It's not gonna be one and you're done. It'll be one, then the others will have to be killed in order for you to get out of there alive.

In no way am I trying to debate anyone's intentions, I'm just saying be well prepared if you're gonna do the deed. I'd bet the farm you won't get out and only have killed one. I think most people could live with someone killing one for the sake of the species, but the question is who can live with the knowledge of having killed an entire family unit? It wouldn't make for a peaceful night's sleep. Chris B.

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norseman

Norseman, you work only a couple hours west of me. Pro-Kill here, but ND is about as unlikely a place to do it as there is. Maybe up in the Pembina Gorge or out in the Missouri River Breaks...

Yah, I just work while in N. Dakota........but I go home monthy:)

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norseman

Norseman,

If you're going to do the deed, look into a big game caliber like a 416 Rigby, have a 500 SW pistol on one hip and a hatchet and folding limb saw on the other hip. If you knock one down make sure you use the 500 SW when you get close enough and put at least 3 in the chest center mass. Try not to mess up the face or the head.

Then, take out the hatchet and saw and remove the head to carry out with you. Don't make the mistake of killing one, then leaving the body to go get the team together to get it out of the woods. When you return, the body will be gone. It's happened before. At least you can carry the head out on the first trip then recover the rest later. If the rest is gone when you return, well at least you have the head and your goal is still achieved. After all, how can anyone deny a head?

It's a Marline 45-70 guide gun, but you have state my plan verbatim. Thanks! (head, foot, hand)

My thoughts would be to have a team of 2 during your hunt. If you are by yourself and you kill one, it's my belief you'll have an extra tough time from the others on your way out. (that has happened before too) So two can be better prepared for the angry individuals you will encounter after killing one of their group. Shoot in relays while the other reloads. I wouldn't split up and let one guy stay with the body while the other goes for help, remember the Bauman story? Some people think the Bigfoot creatures are loners but I don't think so. I believe they live in family groups. So, if you kill the teenager, expect no quarter from Mom and Pop. I guess what I'm saying is be prepared to shoot 2 or 3 if you plan on making it out alive. Mark my words, It's not gonna be one and you're done. It'll be one, then the others will have to be killed in order for you to get out of there alive.

In no way am I trying to debate anyone's intentions, I'm just saying be well prepared if you're gonna do the deed. I'd bet the farm you won't get out and only have killed one. I think most people could live with someone killing one for the sake of the species, but the question is who can live with the knowledge of having killed an entire family unit? It wouldn't make for a peaceful night's sleep. Chris B.

I have made peace with my demons. Because the second the species is recognized I will work hard for their full protection via Federal law. I truly believe they are better off recognized, I hope I only have to kill one and each team member will carry grizzly bear spray as a deterrent. I'm looking at a six man patrol, based on USMC recon SOP's

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TexasTracker

Norse, agree with above. As soon as the animal is down, I'd call in all the teams in the immediate area. Saturate the area to show force and aid in a rapid departure. 4-wheelers would facilitate a rapid departure. If this happens at night, lighting up the area like the 4th of July might not be a bad thing.

I think a 2-man team at this phase is extremely vulnerable to attack, especially if they are tasked with collection. 2-4 members to "secure the area" makes this extraction much more manageable.

My experience is USAF, but I'm sure SOPs are not that different than USMC's.

Edited by TexasTracker

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NCBFr
BFF Patron

It's a Marline 45-70 guide gun, but you have state my plan verbatim. Thanks! (head, foot, hand)

I have made peace with my demons. Because the second the species is recognized I will work hard for their full protection via Federal law. I truly believe they are better off recognized, I hope I only have to kill one and each team member will carry grizzly bear spray as a deterrent. I'm looking at a six man patrol, based on USMC recon SOP's

PM me if you need a man.

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