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norseman

The Kill Club

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bigbear

I do think i am being a little over cautious with scent covering, as you point out bears sense of smell is amazing and they can be hunted with out going crazy.

Color vision i feel is a curse and a blessing all at the same time. Having detailed broad spectrum color vision allows your brain to be tricked by camouflage more easily similar to a optical illusion, there is just so much going on.

JMO

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norseman

I do think i am being a little over cautious with scent covering, as you point out bears sense of smell is amazing and they can be hunted with out going crazy.

Color vision i feel is a curse and a blessing all at the same time. Having detailed broad spectrum color vision allows your brain to be tricked by camouflage more easily similar to a optical illusion, there is just so much going on.

JMO

I would certainly camo up and apply camo paint to my face to get rid of the shine. Sound discipline would also be important with silencing your gear and using hand signals and getting rid of those **** roger beeps on the radio.

BTW, even after four pages of discussion I haven't had much luck drumming up any solid team expedition members either. Although I have had alot of general support about my ideas.

Also I needed a tax write off this year for my business, so I just bought a tracked Polaris Ranger! ;) That would certainly help with logistics in deep snow.

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bigbear

^ yeah good luck trying to get a team together from the forum to actually go out into the field.

I have been trying for a few months just to find a person or a few here and there to just meet up and go investigate some areas.

Everyone talks a lot but bring up actually going out into the field and hear the crickets chirp.

I just like getting out in the woods so If you were planning on doing this anywhere remotely close to where i am from (most likely not) i would consider it, but the other catch is i am uncomfortable around people i don't know with loaded firearms.

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MagniAesir

BTW, even after four pages of discussion I haven't had much luck drumming up any solid team expedition members either. Although I have had alot of general support about my ideas.

Also I needed a tax write off this year for my business, so I just bought a tracked Polaris Ranger! ;) That would certainly help with logistics in deep snow.

I guess I am a little strange here, the only people I go hunting with (regular hunting) are either people I know well, or on occasion someone that has been recommended by a trusted friend

I am part of a group that is planning a sasquatch hunt next year, what we are planning is this:

Meet for coffee a few times to get a feel for one another (already done)

Go out on a few day trips together to make sure we get along and to test out equipment and do some training

Maybe replace a couple of day trips with 2 or 3 day short trips

Assuming this is all successful than a 7 to 14 day main trip.

The day trips/short trips will be in the same area as the long trip

Once about 10 or so years ago I was invited by a good friend of mine to hunt with him and 2 of his friends that I had never met for a 2 week hunting trip up by Babine lake.

The one guy turned out to be a lazy, selfish whiner that wanted everything to go his way and did nothing but complain, the other guy was a pretty decent fellow.

Needless to say it wasn't a good trip.

I never hunted with him again, my buddy hunted with him 2 or 3 times more but their friendship ended when the guy poached a doe on their last trip and my buddy reported him

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norseman

I guess I am a little strange here, the only people I go hunting with (regular hunting) are either people I know well, or on occasion someone that has been recommended by a trusted friend

I am part of a group that is planning a sasquatch hunt next year, what we are planning is this:

Meet for coffee a few times to get a feel for one another (already done)

Go out on a few day trips together to make sure we get along and to test out equipment and do some training

Maybe replace a couple of day trips with 2 or 3 day short trips

Assuming this is all successful than a 7 to 14 day main trip.

The day trips/short trips will be in the same area as the long trip

Once about 10 or so years ago I was invited by a good friend of mine to hunt with him and 2 of his friends that I had never met for a 2 week hunting trip up by Babine lake.

The one guy turned out to be a lazy, selfish whiner that wanted everything to go his way and did nothing but complain, the other guy was a pretty decent fellow.

Needless to say it wasn't a good trip.

I never hunted with him again, my buddy hunted with him 2 or 3 times more but their friendship ended when the guy poached a doe on their last trip and my buddy reported him

I understand completely of what your talking about. Many people say they want to go hunting but what they are really talking about is a camping trip with guns. It's important to get to know one another before you go out. If the guy is late to coffee constantly and he has garbage falling out of his vehicle ever time he opens the door or he constantly argues over the smallest discussions. It's probably not a good indicator you want to spend two weeks in time quarters with the guy.

Anyhow, best of luck to you! If you don't mind keep us all informed of how things work out for you.

Another part of this is finding something that works and cookie cutting it to work into other areas of the country.

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Guest

Hello Norseman, I was thinking of starting a thread documenting my atempts to befriend (or kill) the Nakani up here in Northern Canada, when I came across your thread. I read it yesterday, you seem like someone I would get along with. I would consider going with you, mabee we can talk about it sometime.

in the mean time, some thoughts i had today

Ive been living in a native community for a while now, when we shoot a moose we field dress it on the spot. Cut off the head first, skin it, take the arms and legs off next..etc.etc..when I first came here it took me quite awhile, even to just cut off the head. I was thinking it might be a good idea to bone up on ape/human anatomy. The hand and foot wouldnt be too much trouble but the head could be an issue. Remember this is a creature with no neck. Now this wouldnt be a problem if you had all day but im guessing there is gonna be repercusions once you start hacking up brother Gary.

I feel like BF knows the risks of human interaction and when Gary gets shot they might just say $#!+ happens, but once you start cutting him up they are going to put 2 and 2 together and realize your trying to take him out. Thus jeapordising their existence.

I would only start cutting if i had at least two people standing guard and I would make sure I knew what I was doing so I could get the job done and get out of there!!

I dont know where you could get some information on field dressing apes but it might be something to think about.

(You could always google "Whats the best way to cut off a head" (on your neigbours computer of course)) ha!

You want to leave the rest of the body for the pros but we all know what happens to BF bodys left to their own devices. I think a game cam or 3 could help slow down the body removers or at least document it. Also have you heard of the SPOT emergency locater. It would be a good idea to carry one incase of trouble. I was thinking though, you could use it or a similar device to track the body if it gets moved.

Just insert the SPOT into the body and it will send its location to your computer every 15 minutes. It is dependent on sat reception so at this point this is just an idea i had, not something ive tested

well i gotta go now ill post more later

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MagniAesir

And mammal is a mammal

The organs of a human, ape, or moose are in roughly the same place

Removing the head would be similar between an ape and a moose

Iirc almost all mammals have seven cervical vertebrae no matter what length of neck they have, so just use the same technique

I like to use a saw myself to get through the vertebrae

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Guest

I think your right all mammals would be pretty much the same.

When we take the head off we just use a knife. I start behind his beard, follow the jaw line and aim straight for the base of the skull. If you separate the head at the first vert and the skull all you need is a knife. The head comes off pretty easy if you know where to cut.

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norseman

Hello Norseman, I was thinking of starting a thread documenting my atempts to befriend (or kill) the Nakani up here in Northern Canada, when I came across your thread. I read it yesterday, you seem like someone I would get along with. I would consider going with you, mabee we can talk about it sometime.

I'm game. I think we should set up some sort of requirements for a team. Ideas? I.e. Hunter's safety course. Back ground check for firearms, etc. I want you to be comfortable with me and I want to be comfortable with you sort of thing.

in the mean time, some thoughts i had today

Ive been living in a native community for a while now, when we shoot a moose we field dress it on the spot. Cut off the head first, skin it, take the arms and legs off next..etc.etc..when I first came here it took me quite awhile, even to just cut off the head. I was thinking it might be a good idea to bone up on ape/human anatomy. The hand and foot wouldnt be too much trouble but the head could be an issue. Remember this is a creature with no neck. Now this wouldnt be a problem if you had all day but im guessing there is gonna be repercusions once you start hacking up brother Gary.

I feel like BF knows the risks of human interaction and when Gary gets shot they might just say $#!+ happens, but once you start cutting him up they are going to put 2 and 2 together and realize your trying to take him out. Thus jeapordising their existence.

That head is no problem..........trust me.

And I remember a fairly recent story of two guys in BC getting killed by a Griz over their trophy elk kill. With older similar stories in Montana and Wyoming. When your on a kill, or returning to a kill, your cautious very cautious, but in a group it's part of the deal to set up a security detail. You cut, I cover or vice versa.

I would only start cutting if i had at least two people standing guard and I would make sure I knew what I was doing so I could get the job done and get out of there!!

I dont know where you could get some information on field dressing apes but it might be something to think about.

(You could always google "Whats the best way to cut off a head" (on your neigbours computer of course)) ha!

You want to leave the rest of the body for the pros but we all know what happens to BF bodys left to their own devices. I think a game cam or 3 could help slow down the body removers or at least document it. Also have you heard of the SPOT emergency locater. It would be a good idea to carry one incase of trouble. I was thinking though, you could use it or a similar device to track the body if it gets moved.

Just insert the SPOT into the body and it will send its location to your computer every 15 minutes. It is dependent on sat reception so at this point this is just an idea i had, not something ive tested

well i gotta go now ill post more later

Remember, I'm interested in only getting body parts, I'm not trying to butcher this thing to eat or make a nice shoulder mount. I split the whole back line of a bull elk this fall to quarter it and get it on my mules with a axe. A neck is no biggie.

I think cameras would take too much time. But would depend on the size of the expedition. More people equals more secure equals more time and possible a full body extraction. If I'm solo? I'm hacking like Freddie Krueger and making tracks with undisputable body parts.

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MagniAesir

I think your right all mammals would be pretty much the same.

When we take the head off we just use a knife. I start behind his beard, follow the jaw line and aim straight for the base of the skull. If you separate the head at the first vert and the skull all you need is a knife. The head comes off pretty easy if you know where to cut.

I use a knife to cut all the soft tissue, then a saw for the vertebrae

I used only a knife for years but now prefer the saw

My favorite tool for splitting the pelvis is a cold Steel norsehawk

I know a guy that uses a makita battery powered sawsall for quartering game IF he can get his quad close enough to the kill

On my quad I have a special butchering kit that I use if I can, however if I am far from the quad or didn't bring it then a knife might be all I have

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Guest

Not Going to eat it... What no BFF celebritory BBQ? LOL

I was thinking the cams could be used to watch the body after you left. It might deter the body removal crew.

I havent needed a gun licence or a hunting tag since i came up north. So as far as formal training goes i have none. Growing up my Dad was borderline OCD when it comes to gun safety and thats how i was raised, so im no fool when it comes to guns. Where i live its pretty relaxed when it comes to gun laws (for example in a few hours every man it town will be shooting off one bullet for every member of his family, as per their New years tradition)

that was a question i had are Canadian gun licences valid in the US? What is the process?

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norseman

Not Going to eat it... What no BFF celebritory BBQ? LOL

I was thinking the cams could be used to watch the body after you left. It might deter the body removal crew.

I havent needed a gun licence or a hunting tag since i came up north. So as far as formal training goes i have none. Growing up my Dad was borderline OCD when it comes to gun safety and thats how i was raised, so im no fool when it comes to guns. Where i live its pretty relaxed when it comes to gun laws (for example in a few hours every man it town will be shooting off one bullet for every member of his family, as per their New years tradition)

that was a question i had are Canadian gun licences valid in the US? What is the process?

We don't have a "gun license" per say. The Second amendment allows us to own firearms if over 18 and not a felon.

I'll have to do some checking on what the process is.

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Explorer

I think cameras would take too much time. But would depend on the size of the expedition.

I understand your priority is to safely pursue the hunt and obtain specimen, but documentation of the full chain of evidence would be very helpful later on.

One way to document withouth being burdened by video technology is to use the GoPro videocameras that you attach to your hat or chest, turn on, and then ignore it and do whatever you are going to do.

See link below;

http://gopro.com/products/

I don't have one, but a friend has one and has used it while BF "hunting" in Utah.

He videotapes for 6 hours straight withouth even noticing that the unit is on you.

Just an idea that should not add extra people or complexity to your task.

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Guest

Norseman, I see. I will talk to my Dad, he goes to Montana every year to go turkey hunting, he would know. I might omit the BF hunting part though

I think filming the hunt would be a destraction we dont need. Plus givin the BF's ledgendary camera avioding skills it might give us a handicap to have a camera running all the time. I think the only shot we should be concerned with is the one to the heart.

I know what you mean though Explorer, it would be nice to show the story instead of tell it.

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norseman

I understand your priority is to safely pursue the hunt and obtain specimen, but documentation of the full chain of evidence would be very helpful later on.

One way to document withouth being burdened by video technology is to use the GoPro videocameras that you attach to your hat or chest, turn on, and then ignore it and do whatever you are going to do.

See link below;

http://gopro.com/products/

I don't have one, but a friend has one and has used it while BF "hunting" in Utah.

He videotapes for 6 hours straight withouth even noticing that the unit is on you.

Just an idea that should not add extra people or complexity to your task.

I've seen this and they are popular with extreme sports. But I think what Nak was worried about was documenting the kill site after we had extracted a type specimen, and boogied. To see what would scavenge the site or if next of kin came calling.

I think it's key that we mark it with a long/lat value, so that academic types could go out and document anything else it is that they want. But that's past my pay grade and my race upon delivering "the goods" will be ran.

It might be fun though to use one of those go pros for keeping people posted on our search, trace evidence, etc.

I think my next purchase is this:

http://www.gofoxpro.com/site/products/digital-calls/krakatoa

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