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So... Renae Of ' Finding Bigfoot ' Now Admits She Believes Bigfoot Exist


Bonehead74
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soooo hiflier...... appear / disappear  , not only a hoaxed skeptic, but paranormal also ?  cool.

 

 i'd bet you turn the TV back on if she promises to shape shift on the show  ;)

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Nothing has changed. She does not believe and was just trying to give those that do a bone. Just trying to let on that she takes the subject seriously but not the creature.

So, you've obviously been in communication with her about this then, yes?

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as for the foremost reason, perhaps readers may  be interested in hearing why you think she's there.

 

Renae is eye candy for one of Animal Planet's big demographics.  Note that she came to the show via the BFRO.  How many hard-core skeptics do you think are in the BFRO?  Read their forum if you are not sure.  Because of her science background, it is more politically correct to bill her as the team skeptic than it is as the team lesbian.

 

Lesbian biologist on cult hit "Finding Bigfoot" spills the beans
Ben Cartwright - SDGLN Staff Writer, January 6th, 2012
 
 
ranae-324x205-14751.jpg

 

SILVER SPRING, Md. – For years, Americans have been intrigued with the possibility that half-ape, half-human creatures live in the vast uninhabited areas of our continent. The “Bigfoot†phenomenon has been the subject of or mentioned in numerous books and movies as well as throughout pop culture for generations.

 

While there is no scientific evidence to prove … or disprove … the existence of the Sasquatch, the search for such creatures goes on. Animal Planet has given its viewers the opportunity to watch a team of scientists on their quest in “Finding Bigfoot,†which just began its second season on air.

 

San Diego Gay & Lesbian News obtained an exclusive interview with Ranae Holland, who is one of four cast members, and is known as the skeptic of the group.

 

Holland, who is an out lesbian, said that her relationship with “Bigfoot†dates to her childhood.

 

“Growing up in South Dakota in the 1970s, I remember the ‘Bigfoot’ craze that existed at that time,†she said. “My father was fascinated with the phenomenon and our special quality time together was spent watching Bigfoot movies and exploring together.â€

 

Holland said that later on, she became a biologist and when her father passed away in 2003, she stumbled across some of his “Bigfoot†paraphernalia.

 

“I had flashbacks to the special times I spent with my father and I really wanted to find Bigfoot,†Holland said.

 

Holland became involved with The Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization (BFRO), which is said to be the only scientific research organization exploring the sasquatch mystery.

 

“I didn’t believe in Bigfoot, but I had those memories with my dad and I wanted to honor that,†said Holland, who was introduced to Animal Planet’s show through BFRO.

 

When asked why she thinks people have been so fascinated with the Bigfoot phenomenon over the years, Holland believes that it has to do with the human psyche.

 

“People are curious about the unknown, making the study of this become larger than life,†she said. “Besides, the scientific method is rooted in questioning the status quo.â€

 

How she arrived at her beliefs about Sasquatch

 

While Holland remains a non-believer … or at least skeptical, she recounted some interesting experiences which caused her to question her own beliefs in the existence of Sasquatch.

 

“We were in a very remote area of the Olympic Peninsula of Washington, sent in to areas that no human being would have any good reason to go to,†Holland recalled. “After finding about 30 samples, I saw a one-time flash of black fur. I was leading [the group] and when I came around the ridge line, I looked over my shoulder to make sure the team was OK, and along the opposite side of the river there was an opening in the canopy cover where I saw a flash of black fur pop through.

 

“Now, this just means that I saw a black animal running by,†said the skeptical Holland, who remains open-minded about the possibility of finding a Sasquatch.

 

Speaking out in favor of tolerance

 

“People need to be able to respectfully disagree about the concept and remember that it’s all about tolerance,†she said.

 

On the subject of tolerance, Holland said that she has not encountered much intolerance within the scientific community, recognizing that it does exist.

 

“I don’t find it necessary to discuss [being a lesbian] as I have matured and developed a competent sense of self,†said Holland, who noted that she tries not to concern herself with societal norms.

 

She did say, however, that people should be able to live openly and freely and not have to hide who they are. “We live in a society that still has an intolerant community and dragging people into the closet is reprehensible. LGBTQ rights are basic, civil rights,†she said.

 

Holland said she believes that women have more of an uphill battle within the scientific community, and that more people from marginalized communities need to come forward within the field.

 

“This shouldn’t even have to be a question, but because we are still fighting for these basic civil rights and acceptance, people need to come forward,†Holland said.

 

She offered advice for those who wish to enter into the field of biology or science, especially those in the LGBTQ or other marginalized communities:

 

“First and foremost know yourself, love yourself, and follow your passions. If your passion is conservation, the environment, physical sciences, or whatever it may be, find that person that you love and believe in and make them your mentor,†Holland suggested. “If you are LGBTQ, find a professional mentor, but also find a personal mentor. I recognize that I was surrounded by a community where I didn’t have to hide and this is recognition of the advocates that came before me.â€

 

Bigfoot legend remains huge in pop culture

 

Although Holland’s interest in the Bigfoot craze stemmed for her father’s fascination with it in the 1970s, she thinks people are just as curious today as they were in 1977, when movies like “Sasquatch, The Legend of Bigfoot†were produced.

 

“[Pop culture] things come and go in waves. I think for myself, at the age that I was 30 years after my first introduction, it came full circle,†she said. “With the new technology that exists today people are still asking ‘why haven’t we found one yet?’â€

 

Holland thinks that “Bigfoot†is an opportunity to reach out to children who are at the age where anything seems possible.

 

“All of my best memories from childhood are remembering seeing my dad’s eye get so big when he talked to me about all the things that were possible,†Holland said. “When our team goes to town hall meetings when we are out on the road, what keeps me going is seeing all of the fathers (and mothers) that come to the meetings with their young kids, wide-eyed, making that connection together. I get choked up sometimes seeing that.â€

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Now I get it! She's one of those darn homos! We all know you can't trust a word they say...

***For those who are ready to lynch me for this post, I would like to point out that the above is said with maximum sarcasm***

Edited by Bonehead74
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Hello All,

Living the dream and getting paid for it. Now there's one lucky young woman. My parents gave me my first book on Sasquatch in 1963. So I can kind of relate to her story. The idea is magical and scary at the same time when one is only 13. Trying to keep that feel of mystery going these days is not so easy. It's why I watch the PGF often. It keeps it all fresh. it's still a mind blowing thought when I see that mere 10 seconds of footage that something that truly incredible might be out there. That film always has that kind of an impact for me- every time.

@ Bonehead74,

Heck, I knew that. This is the GF after all. Consider it noted although there may still be some fallout. Hope not.

Edited by hiflier
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Now I get it! She's one of those darn homos! We all know you can't trust a word they say...

 

Renae is comfortable with her homosexuality; I don't know why you or anyone else should be bothered by it.

 

The key is that she was chosen not for her skepticism, but for her sex and sexual orientation.  She's a card-carrying BFRO member with a life-long interest in bigfoot.  Her role as skeptic is scripted.

 

Moneymaker's irritation with her skepticism is, on the other hand, genuine.  He knows it is scripted, but he's so intolerant of skepticism, even phony skepticism, that he can't help himself.  Also, she was not his choice for the fourth position on the team -- the producer insisted it be a woman, preferably one with a preference for women.  Also, Moneymaker has complained that the WA BFRO is heavily infested with bigfoot supernaturalists, and it seems Renae fits that description.

 

The producer wanted a skeptic on the team.  Can you honestly envision Matt, Bobo, or Cliff playing that role?  It would be impossible for any of them to do so.

Edited by Pteronarcyd
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You're way off-base with that one.

Ranae has always been highly skeptical of the whole phenomenon, and was always very vocal about it. The BFRO held an expedition near an area on the northern side of the Olympic Peninsula where she did a great deal of field research. That's how she met MM and several of the WA BFRO folks.

She subsequently visited later expeditions to talk about the wildlife and topography of the area, as she knows it so well. That's how I first met her, and she never gave me the impression that she was a believer/proponent of the existence of an unknown primate.

When MM was putting together people for a TV series after having been approached by Animal Planet, he thought that Ranae would make a great addition, as she's a biologist who worked for NOAA, and she's highly skeptical. Animal Planet had made it clear that they didn't want four "believers" to comprise the cast of the show.

She lives in Seattle, and I lived in Seattle at the time, so MM asked me to shoot a short video of her to submit to Animal Planet as a screen test of sorts.

Tyler Bounds and I went to her place with my video camera, and I filmed a discussion that the two had regarding the subject. She also had a filmmaker friend there who shot some video as well. Afterwards, we went to a forested park to shoot some B-roll footage of her walking around in the woods, identifying plant species, animal sign, etc. Her friend edited together a short video, uploaded to Vimeo, and that was her initial "audition".

It had nothing to do with any membership in the BFRO, or any status as a "bigfoot researcher". It was all predicated on the fact that she has a tremendous amount of experience in the field, and a scholastic/professional background as a biologist. It also had nothing to do with her sexual orientation. No producer sought that out or asked for it.

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The article certainly makes her sound skeptical.  And such things as I have heard that she said (and no I do not watch the show) are what I'd expect from your garden-variety skeptic.

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Hello Doc Holliday,

 

How would I know unless you told me? Even then it would be hearsay ;)

Lol, I would provide rock solid documentation by sending you a TV Guide with episode high lights .

=======

but promoting  a "parasquatch bleever" as a skeptic  for  eye candy to recruit the LGBT community into BFery ?   now that would be a stretch for marketing .

 

the early impressions matt just mentioned and the newest "spiritual BF" claims just don't jive....

 

..... could it simply be her nice way of saying          "Bigfoot , its all in your head " ?

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^ Matt, I respect your perspective on the matter, but there is another story saying that the fourth team member had to be a skeptic, and that a science background, two X chromosomes, and an eye for other women were plusses.  Although Hollywood embraced homosexuality long ago, I think it would have been unseemly for the producer or Animal Planet to tout Renae as the team lesbian.

 

I don't believe I've ever heard what Renae's exact scientific training is, or what exactly she does for NOAA.  But, any legitimate scientist must be skeptical (not scofftical) and open-minded.  From the episodes I've seen she comes across as apprpriately skeptical, and certainly the most stable person on the team.  Matt, Bobo, and Cliff come across as pseudoscientists at best.

 

When you met her in the northern Olympic Peninsula, was she in the field doing specific bigfoot research on her own, or was she doing field work for NOAA and just keeping an eye out for bigfoots?

 

As to her affiliation with the BFRO, the article above implies she is/was affiliated.

 

As for Matt Moneymaker's intolerance of skepticism, you must certainly be able to attest to it from personal experience.  Anyone who has seen the show, read his Twitter feed, or read his posts on the BFRO forum can figure that out.  I have a hard time believing it was his idea to include a skeptic on the team, although you state that was an AP edict.  If Matt M. was familiar with her bio, could he have suggested her because he felt she would make a relatively weak skeptic, one he and the boys could perhaps sway?  Was he aware of her mystical view of bigfoot at the time, or was that view developed after the show began?

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Ranae's father was a bigfoot believer, a pretty strong believer from what I understand, so she was certainly familiar with the ways of the bigfoot world beforehand.

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When I met Ranae, she was in the area doing field work for her job, and visited us at base camp. She didn't attend the expedition; just stopped by to talk for a little bit. She was a fisheries biologist for NOAA. Her field work was incredibly arduous; very difficult and impressive stuff.

She is considered a BFRO member only by virtue of being a member of the "team" on the show. I think MM may have set her up to have access to the database, but she never logged in.

There were other people who were optioned as the fourth team member; some of whom were straight men and some of whom were straight women. They weren't selected due to their belief in the existence of an unknown primate species, so her scientific/outdoor background and skeptical viewpoint were heavily deciding factors in the decision to cast her.

This article was the first I've ever heard of her "spiritual" views of the phenomenon, but I can't speak to whether or not she ever expressed that to MM. It was indeed MM who suggested her. It was his idea, and it was his idea for Tyler and me to shoot a video audition for her. He had a suspicion that she would be the type of candidate that they'd go for based on her background.

I am not aware of any other stories about why she was cast, but I can speak from direct experience with MM, the series, two pilots that were shot prior to Animal Planet becoming involved (I was in both), and having worked on the show as a fixer/field coordinator for two episodes. That's just my two cents. :)

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From the above article:

 

“We were in a very remote area of the Olympic Peninsula of Washington, sent in to areas that no human being would have any good reason to go to,†Holland recalled. “After finding about 30 samples, I saw a one-time flash of black fur. I was leading [the group] and when I came around the ridge line, I looked over my shoulder to make sure the team was OK, and along the opposite side of the river there was an opening in the canopy cover where I saw a flash of black fur pop through.

 

“Now, this just means that I saw a black animal running by,†said the skeptical Holland, who remains open-minded about the possibility of finding a Sasquatch.

 

 So the group she was leading was not one from the BFRO?  And the 30 samples were fish rather than bigfoot spoor?

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Yes, the samples were related to her profession, and she was leading a team of coworkers. That incident occurred on her professional time. That was not on a bigfoot-related outing. We've talked about that incident many times. That happened well before meeting any BFRO members.

Edited by Matt Pruitt
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