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Another report of small foot


norseman
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They are not big foot prints but this is a choke point between two green areas. only went one way. In Florida they say a big one is 350 pounds so ? I ordered dental plaster 3 days before I got it it rained 3 in it was all under water even the ones out of the creek! I was not prepared for this now I have a small tape measure and the dental plaster and waterproof snake boots and a gun for alligators in my jeep !

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1 hour ago, Brian said:

They are not big foot prints but this is a choke point between two green areas. only went one way. In Florida they say a big one is 350 pounds so ? I ordered dental plaster 3 days before I got it it rained 3 in it was all under water even the ones out of the creek! I was not prepared for this now I have a small tape measure and the dental plaster and waterproof snake boots and a gun for alligators in my jeep !

Pack a game camera with you. You might get lucky and get a photo on one of their trails. On one of your photos some of the prints seem to look like the same foot. Or it looks like the same left foot. Just seems weird. An odd way for this animal to walk. On the same left foot into the creek.

 

The game camera you can post it on the trail where these prints were found. You might never know. 

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14 hours ago, Takwi said:

mountains north of Anza, CA

 

You may be in the territory of 'Zoobies'. Research Zoobies and be vigilant.

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Do keep your wits about you if they are Zoobies;  best advice in such a case is 

Doobie respectful of Zoobies!  :popcorn:

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20 hours ago, Twist said:

Has anyone seen a comparison between a barefoot and those “barefoot running shoes”?   I’d guess there is some tell between the two but never checked yet.  Could explain at least some barefoot tracks that seem out of place.  Idk just a wag. 

 

I think they are usually fairly square toed, and do have tread. One brand has a deep rectangular logo on the heel. Definitely something I look for.

16 hours ago, Brian said:

now I have a small tape measure and the dental plaster and waterproof snake boots and a gun for alligators in my jeep !

 

Excellent additions! 

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12 minutes ago, Brian said:

Put one out for a year even moved it around all I got was animals and one game warden.

I have seen some discussion previously about using different types of tricks to minimize any sound/sight/smell of trail cams that have allegedly yielded some good results. Someone used a box so with a hole, like a bird box, where only a small area was viewable to the camera, but that seemed to disguise it better. These beings have some extra sensory capability. I believe a lot has to do with their eyesight. Check this out:   https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/dogs-poop-in-alignment-with-earths-magnetic-field-study-finds#:~:text=Dogs use the Earth's magnetic,journal Frontiers in Zoology says.

 

Dogs can see magnetic fields. We used to be able to. This is a great article about the phenomenon: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-12460-6#:~:text=Numerous organisms use the Earth's,not sense the geomagnetic field.

 

If I came into your back yard and put stick onto a tree, tied there with a couple of black straps, you'd wonder wtf I was doing. These things know their world like we know our houses. A trail cam, with some low level noise and electric current and a beam being projected out are probably about as obvious as a port wine stain on a human face. If these things have the intelligence that their elusiveness suggests, you are going to have to be very stealthy with your equipment to get results. Not only should you think about how to hide the cameras, you should also think about how you put them out there. There is a chance you are being observed the second you come in the forest, if you are in an active spot. If you are able to put something up deceptively, it might benefit your efforts. 

 

Think about it - if I put a trail cam in your living room, how could I 1) get it in there in a way you don't notice, and 2) do it while you are watching me.  Good luck!

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21 hours ago, ShadowBorn said:

Takwi

Were you two on a trail? If you were, then did not see these tracks on that same trail or did you come out at a different spot on that trail. That sediment that you were walking on does not seem easy to leave a track on. Were you able to see your own tracks on that trail.  You cannot go by perception or that feeling of silence in the forest. You are either going to have an encounter or you are not. But going by feeling, that is not going to work. You have a track, but it is hard to tell whether it is from one of these creatures. In my opinion further investigation would be needed. More confirmation.

 

Fine if you got that feeling that something was in that area. where it was dead silent. Then I would suggest trying to communicate with it. That is the type of confirmation that is needed to know what you are dealing with. Gift giving or whatever to confirm to yourself what you are dealing with. This way you will know to whom those footprints belong too. I would just like to know how you felt when you saw these prints. Hope to hear from you.

ShadowBorn,

 

We were hiking on Cahuilla mountain, San Bernardino National Forest, and here is a description of the trail:

 

Moderately difficult, the trail begins at Cahuilla Saddle, elevation 4480 ft., on Forest Service Road 6S22 in Anza. It then proceeds up the northeast slope through thickets of chaparral, Live Oak, and Jeffrey pine. From the 5604 ft. summit are views of the area that Juan Bautista de Anza traveled through on his expedition in 1776

 

We did not see the tracks on our way up to the summit, and saw them on our way back to my truck, about 200 yards from the parking area. My wife spotted them first and we were kind of startled and lucky that I packed my Smith & Wesson .357 magnum  (Powerport version, not sure they make those anymore) because that part of the Inland Empire has a lot of tweakers and that might explain someone running around barefoot in 30 degree weather with patches of snow on the ground. I always bring my hunting license and lead free ammo (Barnes VOR-TX), but next time I will bring my Ruger Super Redhawk .44 magnum and same Barnes ammo, 225 GR XPB HP paired with the my new Henry X lever gun, same caliber.

 

I am 185 pounds and did not leave any tracks in the same area as the tracks that we found (weird?).

I want to get back up there but the truck trail and the hiking trails have been closed for a while now due to the very large Fairview fire back in September of this year.

Not sure what kind of gift I can give if something similar happens -- maybe trail snacks?

 

Takwi

 

 

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1 hour ago, Takwi said:

Not sure what kind of gift I can give if something similar happens -- maybe trail snacks?

Takwi

I would stay away from food, since food can be eaten by small critters. Try using marbles or things that are noticeable, somewhere away from the trail where people cannot see find it. A large can help with placing the gift. I would stack somewhat large rocks on other large rocks and then go back to see if they were moved.  I would do this and give a few tree knocks to let them know I was in the area. Sometimes you would get a response and sometimes you would not. I just did not care. But I would come to the spot a few weeks later to see if they moved the rocks or the gift. I would take a picture before I would leave, so that I could go back to that picture and see what was moved. This is just suggestions and you do not have to try them. But they are methods to the madness of Bigfooting.

 

When it does happen the first thing you will suspect will be humans. But when you start to do a circular search of the area and find tracks. Then it really confirms to you what you are dealing with. That is when you start to know that you are surely are not alone in those wildernesses.  

 

I do not blame you for carrying a pistol. Security of oneself is number one priority while out hiking. You just never know who you will run into out in the forest. If these creatures were so dangerous, then we would not be hearing from researchers who are out in the field looking for these creatures. What I can say is that I have come close of not coming home, while looking for these creatures. Yes, they do get your heart racing. Finding prints on hard soil really gets you going. Hearing the forest go silent is even more eventful. So, I wish you luck on whatever you are planning. Just stay alert.

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On 11/23/2022 at 2:13 PM, Takwi said:

Not sure what kind of gift I can give if something similar happens -- maybe trail snacks?

Fruits with skins like apples or citrus items. Eggs.  Hiding locations are critical. An item with a skin / shell will survive outdoor exposure for a short time. Meat items are expensive. For apples / citrus, smash one item on a tree / rock for olfactory signaling effect. 'They' will find the intact gifts. Small animals will nibble / shred food. Larger animals will remove the food and eat close by. Eggs will show beak, claw and tooth action. Eggs that disappear without a trace of shell fragments indicates sucked up whole or picked up with opposing digits and swallowed. Learning the animal inventory means sacrificing some gift items.

On 11/23/2022 at 2:13 PM, Takwi said:

We did not see the tracks on our way up to the summit,

Tracks---plural. What directions were the tracks laid down? Spiraling out from the trail may help.  However, the terrain may be brutal and limiting. The big questions are where are they coming from, where are they going and why? A day in their life is sleeping, eating, drinking, hunting and zug-zug ( not necessarily in that order ). The area that you visited is interesting. Lots of humans nearby. OHV activity. Hard rock mining sites in the area. Very few creeks. The creeks are listed as intermittent flows.  Many springs and wells. Find the watering locations. West of the car park is Wilson Creek, an intermittent flow creek. From the USGS TOPO 'Cahuilla Mountain Quadrangle 7.5 minute series' ( I assume that you have this map ), there are several springs about 1.25 miles west as the raven flies, from the car park that drain towards Wilson Creek.  Old TOPO maps show good detail. The software for motor vehicle navigation is worthless.

 

A silent forest is normal. Prey critters don't reveal their locations. A 'morning chorus' of animal and bird noises occur as they scurry about but tapers off with heating of the air to make thermal updrafts for avian predators.  

 

Are you followed by ravens?

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