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Billy Willard who is just a very nice gentleman, his group has outtings and I don't believe they charge. Not sure of the requirements tho.

I have been involved with two 'multi-bf-group' expeditions to central Virginia with Billy Willard & company. He is a gentleman, & they do not 'charge' to be on the expedition. 'Nuff said....

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"they are pro-kill"...remember what you told me about not bashing others to promote yourself. Not that your bashing them but you defnintly didnt need to say that.

Why ? Nothing wrong with giving people the valid information and let them decide. The TBRC themselves admits they are pro-kill. Not much wrong with just repeating it.

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  • Researcher A
BFF Patron

By competition I was referring to the previous poster's insinuation that people are wasting their money trying to see a Bigfoot at a BFRO expedition. I say that if you think you can provide services of equal or better value than I suggest you do so. I just don't get the constant complaining about it. Step up and show people you know more and can do a better job and stop whining like a child.

Constructive, knowledgeable criticism about subjects, including paid expeditions, on the BFF (including threads where people take it upon themselves to be one-issue detractors) is the prerogative of people that want honest portrayal of the processes at work in the Bigfoot field. They can then make an informed decision about where they stand on matters and whether an "investment" in time, money or grief is worth their while.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest BCCryptid

I went on one and was pleasantly surprised by the results. As for the people, same as in any group, some really cool people, some quiet to-themselves people, some braggarts, and some complete idiots. No raving lunatics though, which was a relief...

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I think it would be kind of scary being out in the woods with 'BF people'. Sure, there are some level headed people who have an interest because they may have happened to see one at some point, or into anthropology, biology, etc, but BF garners some of the crazies like people who have serious interests in UFO's, conspiracies, werewolves, vampires, etc. I'll pass on paying money to be led around the woods by somebody who's profession has nothing to do with scientific research, or wildlife, and they know essentially nothing about BF, but will try to act as if they possess profound knowledge of them, while being accompanied by 20-25 other people who have no idea what they're doing in the woods. Sounds like the blind leading the blind with flashlights and knocking sticks.

They do have an awesome database, though! And some of the individuals within the group seem like awesome people, but at the end of the day, it seems arrogant to charge people money to give someone the impression that they know anything more than a layman who has Googled BF for 10 minutes.

Edited by PacNWSquatcher
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Maybe the park officials will take a list of expeditions from the past and cross reference them for purchased permits. If they were on National park land, then a retroactive fine would be appropriate if there is not a staute of limitations on this kind of thing. All it takes is one disgruntled expedition participant to verify, that they indeed paid, and was on such and such national land.

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Maybe they will see your post and go after the free expeditions as well. Nothing like giving them good ideas !!

Here's something that to me is pretty unbelievable. I'm dealing with the National Forrest service right now with my application, and trying hard to get a handle on just what exactly the law says. We are not even going into the park, we're just walking through the National Forest. I asked them a direct question yesterday. My question was, " If a group of people are walking through the National Forest looking at the habitat and looking to spot a Sasquatch, do they need a permit? " Their answer was yes. I asked, even if they are amateurs without a guide, simply doing personal research? Again, their answer was yes. So in other words, looking for something that is not proven to exist yet, still requires a permit? Yes. What this translates to is, even if a group of friends decide to go out into the woods and look for tracks with hopes of having a sighting does indeed require a permit.

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Guest minnie-ear

The question is value. Value is a very subjective thing. I don’t find the value in extended warranties on my washer and dryer. My friend Al loves extended warranties. He thinks I’m an idiot and I think he is an idiot. Fair enough.

I’ve been on three of these. While I enjoyed myself, for the most part, I can see where these wouldn’t be for everyone. Not all of these expeditions (a word I hate btw) are equal to one another. The organizer has a lot to do with it. Their knowledge and personality make or break it. There is also luck. You may or may not have any activity. That said the effort is made to take people to places that have activity.

What you get;

Three days of hanging out with people you don’t have to explain bigfoot 101 to. Attendees are generally enthusiastic and either witnesses or somewhat extreme enthusiast (like BFF). The $300 fee is used to weed out anyone who is out for just a lark. Only the truly interested will cough up the dough. Yes, the money also helps cover the cost of putting these on. Should a volunteer researcher have to incur all the cost of setting these up? It’s a lot of work and expense.

Access to some very knowledgeable people. You want to network with people in the know, here is your chance. Most of the BFRO folks I’ve met were great, yes great people and solid squatchers. Not cultist, not overly enthusiastic and certainly not company line haulers. I’ve made some good friends in a short period of time.

Learn techniques that work. Whether you agree or disagree with the morality of tree knocking, etc. the techniques used work. Most importantly you learn when and where to use them. Some of the techniques require a large number of people split into groups to cover a larger slice of the landscape.

You get to play with cool toys (that cost thousands). On all three of the events I attended, everyone was able to go out multiple nights with a piece of gear supplied by the BFRO or organizers. So if you want to see if having a thermal imager is truly the investment you want to make, here is a chance to try out models in the field. I actually prefer not using night vision etc. Some love it.

Mini clinics on casting, tracking (Ranger Robert Leiterman rules), equipment use etc. and lots of bigfoot talk.

If you capture an image, sound, find a footprint and cast it, it’s yours. If you are using their recording gear, it’s theirs. Seems fair to me.

Not everyone interested in bigfoot lives near prime habitat. Not everyone has the backwoods skills. Some people on the trips are true blue city slickers. It’s a great venue for them. It can give people who do live near prime habitat the confidence to get out and start their own field research.

For many it’s once in life time event. They hang out with researchers whose reports they have read. They visit parts of the country they wouldn’t normally venture to. If all work out and luck is on their side they have a better chance of experiencing sasquatch than they would while strolling through the woods.

If you are interested in becoming a member of the BFRO it is a necessity.

All that said; veteran researchers probably need not apply (unless you want to join their group). I live in OR in the woods and don’t find in necessary to travel more than 3 miles to put myself in the thick of it so won’t be attending anymore.

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  • 2 months later...

Not true. I paid $1300 for a 6 day mountaineering course in the Cascades and food was not included. Outside of the expedition fee you only pay for your own food. I have never paid any extra for camping fees.

They do. But it's more about learning HOW to use the equipment.

You are paying to have very experienced people teach you this trade craft. If you don't believe it's worth it than don't go. For me it was a small investment in learning more about the subject. To each his own. I also met some really great people. In my opinion you cannot put a price on that.

Not true.

Public or Private has nothing to do with the chances of an encounter. I would suggest that a public area is actually a better choice as Sasquatches are known to prowl around campsites looking for scraps.

There is a higher probability that they will be located in "certain" areas rather than others. This is what you will learn at an expedition.

If anyone wants more details please PM me. These threads always turn into a BFRO bashing party which does nothing to help interested people make an informed decision about whether to attend.

Glad to see someone step up to the plate and hit a home run.

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Guest TexasTracker

Guys,

I was along on Pruitt's trip into Arkansas that resulted in the fine... The issue has been played out on way too many websites. The short version is that he spoke with park officals prior to the trip, reviewed every single thing they have published about the park and nothing indicated a permit would be required. Once confronted by rangers who attempted to detain the entire group, they found they had no basis on the first 3-4 things they attempted to fine "us" for. Only after about 90 minutes did they decide to come up with this permit issue.

It was messy and Matt handled it much, much more professionally than I think I could have. He was quick to apoligise to the group and took full responsibility for the event. We were then able to continue with our outing and have a productive trip.

Matt Pruitt is right on par with Bart C, Stan C, and basically everyone else I've met with the organization.... Matt's professionalism had a lot to do with me joining the BFRO and I think the business/field would be much better off if more people shared his compassion & understanding for the animal and his desire to educate others....

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Guest BFSleuth

Thank you for posting that TT. From my own dealings with park service officials I think that at times they come from a point of view of bias that something must be wrong and then search for something to pin on the group. It may be that someone tipped them off that there might be an issue that created the investigation in the first place.

From my dealings with members of the BFRO they have all shown a professional attitude. While I'm not personally motivated to join a group, I would think that being a member of the BFRO would likely be a positive experience.

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  • Researcher A
BFF Patron

Yah, I think that Pruitt suffered the consequences for some of the Finding Bigfoot hysteria (and some of the previous expeditions years before where other members were involved with permit negotiating at the last minute). He's a class A fellow.

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Guest ajciani

The Pruitt story appeared in the June 2012 issue of American Hunter on page 24. It still contained the (cost per attendee)*(number of attendees) defective math that was used to estimate the BFRO's take.

The encounter with the Park Service is a rather typical "regulation" enforcement encounter, unfortunately. The enforcers look and look and look until they find something to get you on, no matter how much of a stretch it is, or how ridiculous it is.

Edited by MikeG
.........Political and off-topic comments removed
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  • 2 months later...

I'm a skeptic by nature. I have to wonder if there aren't people who "put on a show" for the non-experienced members of the expeditions--perhaps even unknown to the veteran members themselves. If there are encounters/sightings during the expeditions, are they truly authentic? No offense meant or disrespect intended.

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