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FelixTheCat

Bigfoot 3 Season Nests, Spring, Summer, Fall.

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FelixTheCat

April is the time to find the nests.

 

 

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BobbyO
SSR Team

Felix is this your video ?

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FelixTheCat
Posted (edited)

This is my video and secrets no more.  I urge everyone in the northeast to try and find the nests in the month of April.  I bet more than a few will succeed.

Edited by FelixTheCat
pluralized nest to nests

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BobbyO
SSR Team

Felix do you mind a couple of questions on these nests please ?

 

It's tough to see on the vid, but were then any real stand out features of these nests at all to you that really caught your eye to make them real different from anything outside of general human possibility be it in physical make up or location wise and did you manage to get any close up pics of them  ?

 

Thanks

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7.62

When you say nest. Do you think Sasquatch  are laying down in the open sleeping next to the trail there ?

 

There's no top cover to protect them from rain it's pretty much open?

Maybe it looks different in person than watching it on video .

 

 

 

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FelixTheCat
On 3/27/2020 at 7:26 PM, BobbyO said:

Felix do you mind a couple of questions on these nests please ?

 

It's tough to see on the vid, but were then any real stand out features of these nests at all to you that really caught your eye to make them real different from anything outside of general human possibility be it in physical make up or location wise and did you manage to get any close up pics of them  ?

 

Thanks

I appreciate your interest in this subject, I think it is something that everyone should be looking at right now, because the month of April is upon us, and I guarantee if people look, they will find the nest. 

Imagine walking in the forest in April, and the forest floor is a sea of brown leaves, and you happen to notice, green circles of freshly snipped vegetation laying under Eastern Hemlock trees.

And these green circles of nesting material just happen to be near areas of the forest that you have had the most activity over the years.

 

I didn't snap any photos, only videos, and if you watched the first video, we spooked them out, so they were watching, and I was a little nervous about overstaying my welcome, and also I didn't want

to put so much focus on the nests, for fear of the forest people would leave the area altogether.

That was my though process.

I got another video up on youtube to explain a little bit more.

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FelixTheCat
On 3/26/2020 at 4:56 PM, FelixTheCat said:

This is my video and secrets no more.  I urge everyone in the northeast to try and find the nests in the month of April.  I bet more than a few will succeed.

 

Here is another video with more detail on the nests.

I'm asking for others in the northeast to find their own nests

in the month of april.

 

 

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BigTreeWalker

I have some questions for further investigation. 

1) Were the limbs from the trees under which they were found? 

2) Were the limbs cut or broken. 

3) They seem kind of spread all over the place rather than something that could be laid on. Is there any sign that there was anything laying on them? Other than snow. 

4) Is there any possibility some kind of bough harvesting is going on in the area? I ask because bough harvesting of several tree species occurs at certain times of the year in the PNW where I live. 

5) Are there other hemlock out in the forest, away from the trail, that show the same thing around them? 

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FelixTheCat
On 4/4/2020 at 5:54 PM, BigTreeWalker said:

I have some questions for further investigation. 

1) Were the limbs from the trees under which they were found? 

 

On 4/4/2020 at 5:54 PM, BigTreeWalker said:

2) Were the limbs cut or broken. 

3) They seem kind of spread all over the place rather than something that could be laid on. Is there any sign that there was anything laying on them? Other than snow. 

4) Is there any possibility some kind of bough harvesting is going on in the area? I ask because bough harvesting of several tree species occurs at certain times of the year in the PNW where I live. 

5) Are there other hemlock out in the forest, away from the trail, that show the same thing around them? 

 

I'm sorry if the videos, didn't make everything clear, and I appreciate your interest.

1) the limbs were definitely not from the tree under which they were placed.

   The color was different, and I looked above and saw no snapped off twigs.

2) the limbs were broken, I'll try to make a third video, taking screen shots of the raw videos

  to clearly show they were not cut.

3) your question here leads me to believe that you only watched the second video, which explains the materials and locations,

  the first video has no snow and shows the actual discovery of the nest.

4)  I have no knowledge of bough harvesting, but if your going to harvest them, why leave them in a circle under a different

   hemlock tree?  Why place them along the trail where I always have interaction between May and November, and in the

  exact locations where I have had the most experiences like rock throwing, chest thumping, ground thuds, bluff charges, rock

 clacking and wood knocks. 

5) I have looked under every hemlock tree since the moment I found these nests.  No other trees to date have

  I found these nests, but April 2020, I fully expect to find more.

 

Time is of the essence, I wish everyone in the Northeast in April would go to areas that they have had experiences

and search for these nests, close to the trailhead and close to the trail, under the Eastern Hemlocks.  In April their

greenery will stick out like a sore thumb in the sea of brown leaf litter.

 

Thanks for your time.

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BigTreeWalker

Thanks for the response. Yes I did watch all the videos. 

 

I ask these questions because I am very familiar with the Olympic peninsula nests. Which are in some very remote hard to get to areas. Not right along a trail. Being able to see in several directions is not the same as observing from a well hidden viewpoint. 

As to harvesting. The harvesters do spread stuff all around the area where they are tying their bundles. Bear grass is also harvested in my area. At first I thought it was animals spreading the grass around until I actually witnessed the people doing the harvesting tying their bundles together. 

 

If the limbs aren't from the trees they are under where are they coming from? 

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hiflier
17 hours ago, FelixTheCat said:

Why place them along the trail where I always have interaction between May and November, and in the

  exact locations where I have had the most experiences like rock throwing, chest thumping, ground thuds, bluff charges, rock

 clacking and wood knocks. 

 

Rock throwing is already indicative of something (Human or otherwise) that must have hands. I am more interested in the aspect of bluff charge(s). Could you go into that a bit more, please? 

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FelixTheCat
3 hours ago, hiflier said:

 

Rock throwing is already indicative of something (Human or otherwise) that must have hands. I am more interested in the aspect of bluff charge(s). Could you go into that a bit more, please? 

I am glad that you asked that question, because I have only had two really scary
encounters on the hill.  One was a bluff charge, and the other was a forceful
escort off the hill.  So when I said bluff charges, I should have said bluff charged.
Other things like rock clacking, wood knocking, and stone throwing happen every time
up there during the May to Nov months, but only two really scary events on that
particular hill.

So basically, one bright summer's day, on Aug 25th, of 2012, me and a friend, parked
in the dirt area at the base of the hill, and started up the north trail entrance, check
the map in my video, there is a north and a south entrance, and they circle around and
come together to the trail leading up the hill.  Well, anyways we started in just
chit chatting and stuff, and came to the point where the trails meet, and went right
up the hill, like what I had wanted to do.  While we were walking up the hill,
I could hear stuff moving in the bush on both sides of us.  I would swing the camera,
toward's the noise each time, never even seeing any brush move or anything.

We had made it about a 1/4 of the way up the hill, when a thought popped into my head,
that we were on the wrong trail.  At this point, I had only been up the hill a few times,
and I wasn't quite sure, if I went the right way, or I was actually heading back out to
the south entrance.  So I suggested, that we double back to make sure we were on the
correct trail, and my companion had only been there once before, so it was my decision
to make.

Anyways, I shut the camera off, to save battery life, and we started back, and about
where the north and south and hill trails meet, which is exactly where the nest is,
but this was 2012 and I had no idea there was a nest there until 2019, well this is the
point that a ton of stick breaking and noise like footfalls and brush moving and it
sounded like an elephant running downhill through the forest to meet us on the
right side of the uphill trail, and I fully expected something to come busting out
of the laurel and other foilage which lined the trail on both sides, and I started
shaking like a leaf.  Unless you have experienced this for yourself, you can't even
imagine the fear induced adrenaline rush.

But we just stood there, we didn't run, for whatever reason, to me it seemed that
running would be futile.  I can't say why my friend didn't run.

At this point, I turned the camera back on as soon as could, and suggested that maybe
the forest people didn't want us around.  The video is shaky as can be,  I was literally
shaking like a leaf in the wind.  At this point, my friend suggests that maybe we
could talk to the forest people and ask them if it was ok to hike into the forest.
My friend was not the least be shaken by all the commotion, and I said go ahead and talk
to them, and while my friend talked to them, we both still heard sticks breaking, and
what sounded like a big stick breaking not 20 feet from us, and I couldn't tell where
or what was breaking these sticks.  I sat on a big rock and tried to get video of the
bush, zooming in here and there, but couldn't see a darn thing. Then we heard what
sounded like rythmic wood knocking, maybe a wood ******, but it seemed to go on for quite
a while and it did sound like there was kind of a pattern to it.

We must have waited about ten minutes, and nothing occurred after the wood knocking which
again sounded like it was only about 20 feet away.  So after about ten minutes, I was
able to collect myself, and was still shaking just a little, but we contiued on our hike.
But on the map, where you take a sharp right halfway up the hill to go past the nests on
the hill, well that's what I used to call the decision point, and once there, you could go left, straight,
or right, and that day we went straight.  And aside from a couple of faint stick break
sounds, nothing else of note happened.

Well, that's what I remember, I'll never forget it.

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FelixTheCat
4 hours ago, BigTreeWalker said:

Thanks for the response. Yes I did watch all the videos. 

 

I ask these questions because I am very familiar with the Olympic peninsula nests. Which are in some very remote hard to get to areas. Not right along a trail. Being able to see in several directions is not the same as observing from a well hidden viewpoint. 

As to harvesting. The harvesters do spread stuff all around the area where they are tying their bundles. Bear grass is also harvested in my area. At first I thought it was animals spreading the grass around until I actually witnessed the people doing the harvesting tying their bundles together. 

 

If the limbs aren't from the trees they are under where are they coming from? 

I have at least 4 hills within ten miles from my house, where these beings are.  They are literally everywhere

in my opinon.  I used to hike closer to my home, but urban sprawl brought in too many people and hikers with dogs.  So I moved to a hill a little further north, and I never see another person there, in fact that is what I strive for, to get interaction with an extremely low chance of it being anything other than what I seek.  This trail, is just an old logging road, and is getting thicker and more grown over as we speak.  Its private property and nobody goes there, only a nutcase like me would want to.  Yes, in nine years, I have never even seen another car parked there, or another hiker there.  Dirt bikes and four wheeler will zip by the "parking" area, but that's all they do is go by.  In fact, looking up the hill, you would be hard pressed to even find the trail heads, they are somewhat hidden.  The dirt road that goes by is a right of way for hundreds of years but not maintained by

the private property owners

 

As far as collecting the branches, you gotta understand, that the Eastern Hemlock is one of the most prolific

trees in the forests around here.  Nobody has to drive a mile in on an unmaintained road that is rocky, and some parts very muddy,  most days you would want 4 wheel drive to make it.  Also, its the perfect winter hideout, because with a foot of snow, a 4 wheel drive would even get stuck in certain spots.  In fact, the entrance to the 7000 acre forest, has plenty of Eastern Hemlocks lining the road, no need to go any further

than that. 

 

As to your last question, the trees are so plentiful, it would be almost impossible for me to figure out.  But

they seem to come from some other tree than where they are placed.

 

Anyways, time will tell, I fully expect them to replenish the nests before the end of April, and hopefully

somebody else in this area of northern MA, southern VT, and southern NH will find a nest.

I will report back either way. I have been there every week, and nothing yet.  Last year, 4-22-2019 is

when I noticed them.

 

 

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BobbyO
SSR Team

This potential nest type stuff is very interesting to me, especially when they're 3,000 odd miles from the Olympic Peninsula.

 

There are few, if any, comparables to what is being found in the PNW however, structurally it seems at least, but I guess it would have to be given the differences in location as well as flora etc.

 

What food resources are there in the general area Felix ?

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FelixTheCat
2 hours ago, BobbyO said:

This potential nest type stuff is very interesting to me, especially when they're 3,000 odd miles from the Olympic Peninsula.

 

There are few, if any, comparables to what is being found in the PNW however, structurally it seems at least, but I guess it would have to be given the differences in location as well as flora etc.

 

What food resources are there in the general area Felix ?

 That's a good question,  I guess for meat, deer and all other forest creatures are plentiful.  There is a rather big lake, and a small reservoir and about 4 beaver ponds.  There is a horse ranch, and 1 very small farm.  There is also some land a couple of miles away, rented to farmers by the state, which grows just about anything.  Other than that, acorns.

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