Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. norseman

    norseman

    Steering Committee


    • Points

      103

    • Content Count

      13,497


  2. Huntster

    Huntster

    Sésquac


    • Points

      75

    • Content Count

      19,534


  3. Incorrigible1

    Incorrigible1

    Steering Committee


    • Points

      70

    • Content Count

      10,941


  4. Madison5716

    Madison5716

    Members


    • Points

      51

    • Content Count

      284



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/22/2019 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    When I had my first round of stuff happen in 2012, my new neighbor told me her story. She's one of those hard-core environmentalists who have on occasion handcuffed themselves to trees and blocked forest roads to stop logging. She said they were way out in the mountains, camped out, planning their activities. They had a basecamp, tents, tables etc. One night they packed stuff up for the coolers after dinner, but forgot to put them actually away. They felt like they were under constant observation, but attributed the feelings to nerves. That night something ate the food left in the Tupperware, but the lids were back on. Everyone swore it wasn't them the next day. Then they started finding prints. Eventually they began leaving treats for their Bigfoot visitors. Well, until they were all arrested and the camp demolished. When my truck broke down on Memorial Day, I forgot that I was still wearing my knife when the to truck showed up. I removed it and unloaded some gear from my truck. When the driver curiously asked what I was doing in the woods, I just flat out told him that I was bigfooting. His trainee gasped and started yelling at him to tell me his story. Turns out he had his own sighting nearby, same area that we were at. He was on a call to rescue someone, and pulled over to do something (can't remember, maybe to pee?) And when he got back into the rig, 50 feet ahead of him a 9-foot tall, totally ripped male bigfoot crossed the road, looked ight at him, and walked into the bush. The two truck driver said that the Bigfoot knew he was there, and deliberately did it, like it was a test of nerves. He said it was taller than his truck, he would have been eye to eye. You just never know who has had experiences!
  2. 6 points
    About 1977, I was camping near a small lake in a deep mountain valley on the N side of the Fraser River with my 2 sons, who were 13 and 7 at the time. While the youngest boy and I were off-loading gear from the back of my '72 Suburban, the older boy, Steven, was goofing off, not helping. As I was about to call him over to give a hand, he started calling "Dad! Dad! look at this!". I ignored him the first couple of calls, then stepped around the truck the 3rd time he called. He was pointing up the clearcut hillside on the opposite side of the logging road from our campsite. Following his pointing finger, I saw a large patch of black just disappearing into the timberline at the top of the cutblock. I said, "Wow, you just saw a black bear, now come and help us". He insisted that it wasn't a bear that he saw, but a huge, hairy black figure walking on 2 legs. I pressed him pretty hard about the description, and he remained adamant that it walked like us, not like a circus bear on its hind legs. It was in that same valley, a year later, that I had my own sighting, about 10 km (6 mi) from that campsite. The following spring, I found a trackway, in the wet spring snow, on the same side of the valley, crossing a saddle over the mountain to the next valley eastward. This time, I contacted John Green, who lived about 30 km from there, and took him to the trackway the next day. That trackway find, and my telling of my son's sighting, are both in his database. My research partners, Magniaesir, Steenburg, Alohacop, and BigfootHunter, all have either firsthand encounters, or stories from family and friends, that brought them into this field, and brought us all together to continue to search for tangible proof of Sasquatch.
  3. 5 points
    Soaking in Ainsworth hotsprings this weekend. Took a drive today up through Kaslo to Trout lake BC. Hwy 31 turns to gravel. Saw a wolf cross in front of us about 200 yards away. Not sure what the pile of poo is. Kinda looks like Horse, but much too small. Kootenay Lake, Duncan Lake and Lardeau river looked full.
  4. 5 points
    It’s easy to look at sighting reports and pick em apart. And things like audio files in which a pack of coyotes is being described as Bigfoot vocalizations. But do any of us have any close family and friends claiming to have seen a Bigfoot with conviction? Unlike some of you? I’m not a knower. But I would like to share a few stories with you. With the standard disclaimer that physical evidence is needed. My father had a cabin up by mount Index, one night while walking back to his cabin in the dark. Something large and grey crossed the road in front of him. Now he openly admits that he had been drinking..... but not that much. He said that it could have been a mountain goat. But he had never seen a mountain goat that low before and along the river. Dad was a prolific hunter in his younger days. Had a friend who sold me my engraving shop. She swore while coming back to Kettle Falls along the Kettle river by the boulder creek road she had a Bigfoot cross the hwy 395 right in front of her. Her husband is a good guy, but definitely gave her quite a bit of flak for sharing that story. But she has never backed down. She was adamant being a local it wasn’t a known animal. My packing partner who is also a member of the BCHA claims to have heard a frightening sound while riding his horse. He never saw what made it. I had some examples of the Sierra sounds and he picked out the sound byte that starts out as growls, snarls and gibberish and then breaks out into whistling as the closest to what he heard. He said that his horse was having none of it. And it freaked him out. He lives in Ferry county and has Bears and Cougars in his yard. No joke. One of our own BCwitness who I have met twice with in BC while doing some jet boat repairs up there had his own sighting. I respect him to the utmost as a woodsman and his prowess in the woods. And BC is BC.... it’s a massive province with most of the population living in one city.... the rest is mountains, trees and glaciers. I think BC is likely the best last place on Earth for the search. I have spent a lot of time in the Kootenay region as they call it, a lot of country up there. Like Alaska big....and as remote. Getting guns up there is problematic tho. Of course my own snow track story you guys have heard a million times. Do any of you have any stories to share of your own or others? Does having someone close to you a witness sway your own beliefs? Discuss!
  5. 5 points
    I apologize for my tardy response Hiflier. I have been thinking about how I might answer your questions (and whether or not I could). 1st a disclaimer: I was educated as a paleobiologist. I have studied fossil invertebrate populations with regard to their specific variations (variations within a species due to ontogeny - that is growth from infant to adolescent to adult), parasitism by competing organisms, and evolutionary considerations as they impact our understanding of the genus, family, and order classifications in a particular class of invertebrates. I have taken graduate level courses in genetics and evolution (but a long time ago - invertebrate zoology was one of my two minor subjects), BUT I AM NOT A GENETICIST! So take what I might say with some healthy skepticism - and I welcome discussion from real geneticists (and I am guessing from your questions that you already know most, if not all, of what I am going to say). Some good news: With regard to DNA, hair is amazingly stable in a variety of environments that would be considered risky in other respects. That is mainly due to the presence of cuticle, the outermost hard layer of a three-layered hair shaft (inner medulla, medial cortex, outer cuticle). The cuticle protects the medulla, and the medulla contains a lot of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Some bad news: Nuclear DNA (nDNA or nuDNA) is lost in the process of cornification - in which protein cells become hair. Although many people think that a follicle needs to be attached to a hair shaft for extraction of nDNA, nDNA has occasionally been extracted from the medulla of a hair shaft - sometimes months or even years after the hair has been pulled/shed from a human body - I guess this should be included under the "good news". In most cases the best that one can expect from hair in terms of DNA is mtDNA. mtDNA is not pertinent for ID'ing individuals, but works for ID'ing species (if that species' genome is included in an existing gene bank - and it should be useful as a match for higher classifications as well, such as genus, subfamily, and family). According to at least two hair experts, Sasquatch hair commonly lacks a medulla, and, when present, the Sasquatch medulla is discontinuous and not prominent. A number of mtDNA studies of purported Sasquatch hair have suggested Homo sapiens, and the natural conclusion is human contamination. There are a variety of methods for decontaminating DNA samples, and actually hair, again because of the protective cuticle, is especially prone to successful decontamination. As I have said in other threads, there exist in all know human DNA (ALL HUMAN DNA) genetic markers that are unique to Homo sapiens, so any DNA researcher looking to verify human contamination or to suggest the existence of other than human DNA, must look for one, or a few, of those markers, else he/she is falling short of performing adequate study (trying to be kind here to past researchers - I would rather say #*&@&%$*!). I think study of suspected Sasquatch hair is worth study, without regard to external environmental challenges and without regard to time in environment. I am not like the body of posters on this site (mainly inductive reasoners - some brilliant, some notsomuch) that can run through a myriad of explanations and possibilities addressing a single data point. I am admittedly not brilliant - I am a plodder. I try to gather a lot of data and methodically work through that data to try to understand it (that's a tough thing in this Sasquatch world containing a fair bit of purely anecdotal data). If I were confronted with testing old hair for DNA or making the determination no to do so because conclusive results might be unlikely, I would say do the analysis - one never knows what might turn up (my experience has been the more one learns, the more one realizes there is more to learn). I had planned to address your questions more directly, but I am running out of gas. The subject does interest me, however, and I look forward to more communication with you.
  6. 5 points
    Now that I have nothing to do on the weekends, since my truck is broken down, I've been rewatching some of my favorite videos. This is one of my favorites. It's the one I show folks who question if bigfoots might actually exist and why they behave as they do.
  7. 4 points
    Norseman, great shots of the Kaslo/Gerrard area. I hunted up there for 5 or 6 seasons, a couple of decades ago, with lots of success. Kiwakwe, I like your area a lot, too, though it does look a bit dry out there. I got out for about 5 hours this afternoon, 'cause I just HAD to try out the new lift kit in the Outlander. I chose a quiet valley about an hour from my home, and wasn't disappointed in the improvement to the ground clearance of the vehicle, or the peace and quiet of the spot I chose to explore. It's a steep creek valley South of the Fraser River, extending back towards the US border. Because the road access is not marked, and fairly well hidden from view of the main highway, it sees almost no traffic, with no lakes or camp areas to attract weekend warriors. I saw no one at all in the whole time I was up there. I did see a couple of grouse, some deer tracks, and a fairly big bear scat, but no other wildlife at all.
  8. 4 points
    Sometimes i wonder if i should even be posting stuff here. But in the end, I'm not out to find scientific proof. I have no desire or means to kill a type specimen, no need for fame or infamy, and no wish at all for that media nightmare. I have no money for tests or studies, and no contacts or networks with the movers and shakers of bigfootdom (well, okay, i have one. Who just moved away. So, not really). I do it for my own curiosity, my own desire to find answers for myself. I hope nothing i post here gets any of the hairy folk in hot water. After i fell down this rabbit hole, for years i couldn't get out in the woods. Now that I can - usually - i post for folks who were (are) like me - insatiably curious. I love teading everyone's stories and adventures. Boldly go, and all that!
  9. 4 points
    Back to the Book Cliffs, near the Reservation, escaping 100+ degrees by getting up to 9700 feet. Cool nights to low 50s. Only saw one Muley. Beginning to think there isn't enough water up there to keep a Sas happy. A very quiet night, not even insect sounds, sleeping in the Rover with rear door and windows open. Camp was perched with a panoramic view and again, spent time with binocs watching clearings in the forest below and walking along old trail and forest rd after dusk. Lots of open sagebrush out there too. Camp, facing S : Just below the sagebrush "rim" in font of the truck: Some of the acres sagebrush: Scanning the forest below: And to the N: On the way down:
  10. 4 points
    My son is "developmentally disabled".........when I was young, it was called "mental retardation". The liberals keep changing the name of the disorder because other "retards" use the designation as a weapon against others. Before "mental retardation" it was "idiot". Before that it was something else. Etc. He has an IQ of about 57. To give you an idea of severity, the U.S. military will not accept anybody with an IQ below 85. He has great difficulty understanding many simple things. Rote behaviors are his mainstay. But, amazingly, he has great strengths. They are mostly what I would call spiritual. He has an incredible ability to discern right from wrong. Of course, if you tried to trick him with discussions of morals, he would get lost, but it would be difficult to get him to actually wrong somebody. And by watching sports on TV, participating in Special Olympics, and going to our minor league ball games, he has almost all sports pretty much covered......in great detail, including the name of the guy who pitched the no hitter in a particular game seven years ago on the other side of the continent. Autism is an interesting thing. I can't even call it a disorder. It's a different plane. I believe Madison understands that sasquatches have a completely different thinking focus than we do. They have no use for even simple mathematics, reading, or the scientific method. But when it comes to living in the Garden of Eden, which is right outside our door ("The Kingdom of God is at hand!"), sasquatches can "do it in the dark" where all of us are pretty much out of our element.
  11. 4 points
    We were on the Omaha Reservation in Northeast Nebraska, where I had my sighting last year. The night was epic, with a supposedly cloaked sasquatch (seen by at least 3 people) reaching out to one of our team. I didn't see that as I was distracted by the guy who could not move his legs and said he had one right in front of him, which I also could not see. I did see what looked like a black 'shadow' pass between Igor and myself - totally silent. This place is said to be very haunted...
  12. 4 points
    I don't have much interest in any of the youtube bigfooters EXCEPT a seemingly new guy, howtohunt.com, is putting up some stories that ring as reasonable. I am skeptical of all of them for one reason or another. I think there's something to be learned from most but you have to learn to back-filter their personal biases out to get to the value. I'm not going to name names, some of the folks are personal friends and I'd have to bash them pretty hard to explain what to take away from each. I think I can answer that safely. There are 4 I suggest starting with. In no particular order, 1) The Locals by Thom Powell 2) Enoch by Autumn Williams 3) Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science by Jeff Meldrum 4) Abominable Snowmen: Legend Come to Live by Ivan Sanderson I think understanding each point of view is necessary to understand why we don't have proof yet. In addition, Sanderson gives a more worldwide view as well as an older view. Once you're grounded via those 4, then there's a ton more reading to do. What I do not find useful are more "bigfoot crossed the road ahead of me" accounts. There is nothing further to learn form those other than building a map of sightings in time / space to perhaps help focus on locations that increase the probability of having a (or another) sighting. The hoaxers on the sasquatch detective hall of shame. I would avoid anyone making absolute statements about what they are sure of. I would watch out for anyone posing as a sasquatch authority. I learned much from my research partner of past days .. who will remain nameless. I question much of what I learned .. needs to be verified and has not been. I think that's a solid theme. Get the ideas others are willing to share but don't accept them without doing your own verification. Too many people want to be spoon fed ... they need to examine what's in the spoon when that happens. Rather than looking to someone else for your truth, find others willing to go in search of truth with you. Have not met you or Northwind but I believe that working together you are potentially ahead of the talking heads you are looking for. Have faith in yourself / yourselves. In the end, as I found with my research partner, I'm all I've truly got, the rest is fleeting. MIB
  13. 4 points
    So little is known of bigfoot I’m often wary of anyone that claims to know for certain anything. The best people, imo, to learn from are knowledgeable hunters and out doors-man and what I try to take away from them is basic knowledge of the wilderness.
  14. 4 points
    I went for a walk Saturday. 10+ miles, 3 on trail, 7 out through the woods over logs under logs through brush etc. Got lost-ish for a while. Trail vanished under drifts up to 6 feet deep. Bit sunburned. Bug-chewed. Some minor issues with leg cramps. NO BLISTERS!! My best picture from the trip: Little bit of zoom on that. It's about 5-6 mils to the snowy ridgeline. MIB
  15. 3 points
    This one sounds pretty freakin eerie, and I haven’t seen it posted & talked about before on here. Anyone know more about it & what do y’all think? Cheers! Possible Bigfoot Vocalizations In Kentucky...
  16. 3 points
    There are some interesting looking bedrock riffles in the main creek. I'll have to get back up there again this summer with my gold pan. Ya never know!
  17. 3 points
    I discussed retrieval with Mendrum one time. The context was bones and what would be the priority for furnishing him proof of existence. He suggested if possible to leave it in the ground. Cover and mark it then call him in. This has advantages and disadvantages depending on who owns the land where it is found. If it is federal land it is a problem. The people that found the T Rex Sue on Federal land ended up gong to prison for two years for violation of federal laws. Leaving it in place allows strata dating and context as to where the bones were found. Clean, probably least likely to get you in legal trouble, but risky in that you could loose the location and the bones to authorities. If you decide to collect the bones the skull is highest priority. Next would be hands and arm. Femur is next then feet. Document the bones in the ground and remove everything if you can. Body parts would be in the same order if you find a body and cannot bring everything out. Calling in Meldrum might be a problem if the location is not Idaho. He has standing there being associated with Idaho State University and probably knows who to talk to in dealing with authorities. Outside of Idaho he has no standing other than academic credentials. He may know who to call in Washington or Oregon and bring them in. But my opinion is that calling in someone in a University from the finding State might be a great advantage in dealing with authorities. Otherwise it is very likely when word of the finding gets out, the bones or body will be taken away from some lay person finder, who in the opinion of the state or federal authorities has no right to possess the bones or body. In the best of cases, the academics will give you finders credit. In the worst of cases, you will end up in prison for violation of antiquities or NA object or body possession. I put out feelers and have found a Washington University PHD level biologist who might be a good person if I can get him to believe what I have found. I was able to establish email contact and actually have a conversation with him. He would be my starting point for a contact in my State of Washington. It might take a photograph of a bone to interest an academic. Anyway my point is that if you are in the hunt for body or bones, you best grease the skids and have contacts in mind to call should you be successful. Finding something first without a contact could be a race with a rotting body. Smedja comes to mind when I think about these issues.
  18. 3 points
    I carry a more substantial kit than most, but I'm EMR rated, so I'm a nerd on a stick when it comes to TCCC gear. TFAK/IFAK (Condor Tear Away Medic Pouch [full size 5"W x 9"L x 6"D]): 1 Swat-T tourniquet (not good for self-application) 1 Sof-T Wide tourniquet (external mount) 2 Israeli 6" compression bandages 2 North American Rescue 4" X 4 yard compressed gauze. 2 28Fr Nasopharyngeal Airways w/lube 1 North American Rescue S.P.E.A.R. decompression needle 2 Hyfin vented chest seals 1 1" roll of Gorilla tape 6 feet of 2" Gorilla tape 4 5x9 gauze pads 1 3" ACE bandage 1 3" roll of compressed Curlex 1 60 ml sterile saline wash in bullet tube. 4 pr. Nitrile gloves in light blue. 1 pr. Nitrile gloves in black. 1 pr. Trauma Shears 1 SAM splint 2 Mylar Emergency Blankets Total weight: 2 lbs. Boo Boo Kit (Condor Tear Away Individual First Aid Kit): Band Aids: 4 each in all the sizes. Triple Antibiotic ointment 1 Triangle Bandage 8 4" Gauze Pads 8 2" Gauze Pads Benadryl Imodium Tylenol Dermabond Total weight: Less than 1 lb. Truck Kit (Bag varies on anticipated conditions) Double everything above plus: 1 Pocket BVM (Bag Valve Mask) 1 Suture Kit + associated tools 1 Full set of Nasopharyngeal Airways w/lube 2 Staple Suture guns + staple remover tool 1 MDF Acoustica Stethoscope 1 BP Cuff 1 GPS Emergency Beacon It sounds like a lot, but it's less than 3 lbs on my person for the TFAK and the Boo Boo kit. Less than 12 lbs for the truck kit. I've been doing this for 30 years, so I've seen some weird injuries. We had a team member get a concussion from a hedgeapple (osage orange) falling out of a tree he was under, then another guy twisted an ankle stepping on another hedgeapple trying to get to the first guy. A couple of years later, we had a member take a tumble down a hill and impaled himself on a tree branch that had been broken off about 8 inches from the trunk. That's when I decided to get the proper training and gear to take care of most things long enough to get them advanced care. You might notice that I didn't list a hemostatic agent like Celox or Quick Clot. I just don't have any at the moment. I'm a fan of Celox Combat Gauze Rapid. Stay away from powders. If a wound requires hemostatics, powder will flow right out of the wound and do nothing. Wound packing with a hemostatic gauze is preferable and applying direct pressure, but hemostatics will leave some nasty scars. Get some basic training and be safe out there! :-)
  19. 3 points
    Oh next time we go out in n the woods, let's do it up! Make a day camp, cook some food and let the bigfoots find us instead of hiking all over the forest looking for them! As long as we can keep the cougar and the bears away. Those 50 bear poop piles might deter me a bit, but what about setting up right off the road? You know where I'm thinking! We could even stay until twilight, with just enough light to get off the mountain before full dark. That would be fun! Let's do it! I'm a good camp cook and I have lots of cast iron cookware.. I got my ghost meter back from Tobe yesterday at Strangebrau, so we can play with that, too. Oh, and I recorded some Thom Powell and Ron Morehead for you to hear. Fun!
  20. 3 points
    I prefer moose or even bison to elk meat, but I'm not too picky. Had these recently with dinner. Grew these pearl oyster mushrooms myself. I love learning how to do new things. Dutch oven cooking is something I would like to learn one of these days, too. And I would like to build a cedar strip canoe.
  21. 3 points
    In this community we all have open minds at various degrees. Personally speaking there are elements to this conundrum that I did not buy into six months ago that I’m suddenly open to. It’s been like that from the beginning for me and seems to be an evolving, fluid thing. While I’m still in the “Flesh & Blood” camp, I’m now reaching into Quantum Physics to explain things that didn’t make since to me before. I don’t want to be a “sucker” either, but I want to know “the truth”. We are all at risk at looking stupid. I think the methods outlined in Sasquatch and Civic Duty offer some solid guidelines that we could follow as a group. Individual testimony will never win this battle, but organizing will… if it’s possible to organize this community. Thanks for your confidence in Show Me Bigfoot. I try to keep it as unbiased as possible and leave my opinion out of it!
  22. 3 points
    Somebody took a leak there before the sasquatch built his nest on the spot. But it couldn't have been me, because the DNA results would have come back as Neanderthal with a high level of alcohol in the urine.
  23. 3 points
    I love my Esee 4 for general purpose but that is a sweet blade Norseman. Spent time in some slot canyons, the Navajo Reservation and Valley of the Gods this past weekend, places not so suitable for our hairy friend.but here are a few from our last trip to the Book Cliffs. Fairly quiet, only heard some very distant coyotes. Rained a good bit of the night, that combined with snow pack melting on the road made for some sketchy driving conditions. I've not heard of any sightings in the BC but the few ranchers living here would doubtfully submit any reports and the place sees so many fewer people than the Uintas. Camp: Spent a good bit of time with binocs scanning the area below camp. Nada.
  24. 3 points
    Was gonna check springs, but cows are up here in summer pasture. My buddy built me a knife I’ve been packing.
  25. 3 points
    Big pile of Bear poo!
  26. 3 points
    Great info! Thank you! And I would return the favor anytime yer in my neck of the woods bud! This is why I like diesels.
  27. 3 points
    I've had a big grizzly and a big wolf do that exact same thing to me on two different occasions. The wolf really disgusted me. I had been sitting for hours watching a moose gutpile hoping fir another bear to show up (I had already shot a big black bear off that pile). I heard the guys coming to get me in the riverboat, so I started packing my stuff, then stood up. That's when this big wolf stepped out of the tall grass looking at me less than 50' away. He was gorgeous. Then he stepped forward into the grass again and disappeared. He had been waiting for me to leave.
  28. 3 points
    Norseman - Good topic! As you know, I'm a knower. One of the most challenging aspects of dealing with that has been my father's ridicule. For a long time, because of his threats of what he'd do to me, I never told my story a second time. It went .. badly. So, ironically, a few years ago I was visiting him. Some of his friends stopped by and the coffee, cigarettes, and yarns started. He told a story I'd never heard. His dad was one of the surveyors who surveyed the White Pass ski area. Dad, though under age, accompanied grandpa. He said they were heading towards work and he looked out the window through a gap in the trees into a snowy field and there was a big stump or rootwad which "looked exactly like bigfoot would have looked if it existed, which it doesn't." He concluded the story by saying that the "stump" wasn't there on the way back. "Huh". A second piece, ambiguous but intriguing to me, was my great grandfather. That'd be dad's mom's dad. He died when I was 13 or 14. He lived next to us, a few hundred yards up the hill, and I spent a lot of time with him. Grandpa was a very serious man and particularly touchy about his reputation. He'd pulled himself up by his bootstraps and made something of himself putting his siblings through college as well along the way. So why did he have 2 copies of George Haas' Bigfoot Bulletin on the porch essentially inviting people to ridicule him? I suspect he'd seen or experienced something that overrode his cautious protection of his reputation. MIB
  29. 3 points
    I watched both videos from start to finish and what I came away with is that there is no new information of much value... all this for me is just opinions, taken from all kinds of contexts with a lot of unknowable things, hear say, 3rd person Heck I know a lot of grown men who could make the Nephatia (or whatever everyone says its name is) vocals or made an equally impressive interpretation of it. Thats easy stuff... but for me I never had one speak that way in English in my experience...So that vocal while creepy was always the weakest part of it all for me. I was like just uncomfortable with that for whatever reason. Then there is the whole lot of folks who believe they are speaking with them and I recall a medium (if you will) Sasquatch Psychic Kathleen Odom poked her nose in there and made some definitive statements as to communicating with Nephatia) So if the cottage owner is Nephatia then what say her (miss Odom). So what do we have here a circle of scammers and hoax collaborators... or a series of completely independent sorts of ridiculousness? I remember when this sh*t show started to come off the rails and the cottage owners saying they had a falling out but the SSq interactions were legit... At first something personal happened between the parties that we cant know by not having been there. So for me conflating the stories with the owners claims of long (generational) activity along with (even up till some time after the split) they continued to claim it was all legit... blaming like personality dynamics and projection...etc. Its to the point I cant trust anything that comes out of this story from the actual players all the way down to the referees. Its sad really. It really does come down to "I guess ya had to be there" all else is speculation... I had always maintained that TJ was indeed experiencing real things (still think he was and that he believes that he was), and that I had questions as to if his interpretations of what that was is where I always drew a line. Either being hoaxed or the thing all being real all boils down to our Creators eyes I imagine, and wait we must to see all the parts together in all their factual and hopefully review able glory. I believe everyone has a sellout price as our history is filled with characters with whom for one of a plethora of reasons might turn a story (on a contrary), or even because of money,ego,a sacred trust violation, you name it, it could be motive to want to say it was all BS... I dont think all these unknowable facts are quite discernible at this point Ill tell ya the rest just has the aroma of Heironimus cologne, and a bitter kind of obsessive stalker like quality to it.... but if there is any truth to any of it, Im not sure who comes out looking like the fools... I mean what kind of a person would walk someone into such an elaborate maze of psychology , only to make them appear crazy (or the phenomenon) in the end.... Nah Finding Bigfoot did enough for that HAHA Entertainment though. For me at the end of the day there are knowers and there are non knowers , you can be a non knower and open minded and also be closed minded, it doesnt really matter much, but when your a knower those arguments melt away from either attempting to defend or having much viable wisdom... IMHO
  30. 3 points
    I’d disagree, it may have raised the general public awareness level but on a scientific level I’d guess it was detrimental. The practice of going in the woods and beating trees or howling does not seem very scientific to me. I believe scientists would look at them like a bunch of goofballs.
  31. 3 points
    I got out for Sat., Sun., and this morning, camping with a research buddy in a limited access mountain valley less than an hour from my home. Back in April, our campsite there was visited by a Cougar, but all we got in the area this time was a low growl, from the underbrush about 500yds down a trail from the tent at dusk, probably a black bear, as there are lots back in there. After dark, both Sat and Sun night there were a couple of canine type barks that didn't sound like coyote. I saw 1 grouse, young and skinny, a turkey vulture in flight from a vantage point above him, which was great to watch, a nice big raven near our camp, which I only spotted once, but heard often, as well as hearing a barred owl's distinctive call, and another owl with a plain "whoo, whoo" call. Several deadfalls in the nearby timber caught our attention on Sun evening, too. Just being out there for the long weekend, in perfect weather, washed away several weeks of stress and tension.
  32. 3 points
    That's the mental illness side of the coin. Lot of people do not want truth, they want personal validation. They can be the same thing but aren't necessarily so. If you put truth first, validation will come when truth is found, but if you put validation first, truth may never come. MIB
  33. 3 points
    BTW - I've been pondering it a bit. I bet that was a phone insulator. Before the Pacific Crest Trail was designated in '72 we had the Oregon Skyline Trail. It was originally from Mt Hood to Crater Lake. That section was finished in 1920. The rest, connecting to the OR/WA border and OR/CA border, was finished in the 1930s if I remember right. The PCT and OST use 70-80 % of the same route, but not all of it. The O-S-T route was changed a few times over the decades. There was a time when, at least for some locations, a phone line followed the O-S-T connecting fire lookouts back to town ... all pre-dating wilderness designation of course. I've seen those insulators a place or two on the PCT where it uses the same location as the older O-S-T. I betcha that insulator is along an abandoned stretch of the O-S-T. Bet if I had taken more time to look around left and right rather than plowing straight ahead (east) I might have seen more insulators, maybe old blazes on trees. I have been trying to locate the old O-S-T in that area and map it before it is lost. I think that insulator is the loose thread I have not previously been able to find. A sense of excitement / accomplishment is building. The very cool thing is I GPS-ed it. Cramps .. I usually get them in the hamstrings first, then in the sartorius muscle from controlling my leg as I loft them over obstacles. Finally in the quads, usually lower end. Though it is my calves where I get them when I'm sleeping, those seem pretty bullet proof when I'm out hiking. MIB
  34. 3 points
    Last year warm rocks were thrown at our group in Iowa (I have never heard rock clacks that I can recall) Link to audio: https://soundcloud.com/redbone2/091218-1002-and-1004-pm-rocks?fbclid=IwAR1aOPSYftgoE1kEkHlf8kZaujd9TAfd-j0Xkv76bOqMQS301fVNUFsLajY We had several warm rocks thrown. I talked about it here:
  35. 3 points
    All I want to know is how sasquatch in ontario throws his voice and cracks lake ice?
  36. 3 points
    I definitely see the sasquatch in this photo. While he is trying to hide underneath that hat, he isn't as successful as in the other photos where the sasquatch is completely obscured by foliage. This particular critter looks to be one of those extremely rare Scandinavian breeds. I thought they died out @ 1000 years ago.
  37. 3 points
    Most of these people are not woodsmen and they go out into the woods and get freaked out by the natural sounds of the forest. People tell me that Bigfoot mimics coyotes.....🤪 Ummm. I call in and shoot coyotes. They do not all sound the same. Bull elk do not all sound the same. It’s like people find a certain call on YouTube. And then that means every coyote sounds just like it. And when in the woods if they hear a deviation of the call? It’s Bigfoot. No. It’s a different coyote. Wood knocks? Wind. Temperature change. Various natural forces can cause wood knocks. The wood fiber inside of the tree can creak, pop and groan. Hearing a wood knock in the forest does not mean a Bigfoot is knocking against a tree. I’m not saying they do not do it. I’m saying that other forces can account for it. As far as people hearing voices in their heads and think it’s Bigfoot? Well.... I’ll just say there are real mental conditions that can cause that. schizophrenia being the most prominent. I personally find it hard to believe that Bigfoot knows English and has mind speak abilities while living in the forest, poops on the ground and sleeps out in the cold. They should be using their mind speak abilities to figure out when the next food truck is coming by and push a tree down over the road. With that said? Koko knew over 200 signs in sign language. Impressive. I’m not trying to make it sound like Bigfoot should be a complete moron. Hominids are smart. But for a creature living in a forest trying to survive? I think Bigfoot has more pressing matters than sitting around having mental conversations with humans. If you see good fresh tracks in the forest.... not forest divots. If you see the creature itself. I think you can start ascribing traits you see, smell and hear to Bigfoot. I can smell Elk when I get close. I know their there. I see their tracks, I see their scat. But I do not pay attention to forest divots and ancient rubs that do not do me any good.
  38. 2 points
    http://www.bfro.net/GDB/show_report.asp?id=933
  39. 2 points
    Huntster, I've been guilty of this too, as I am sure many people have. I just wanted to let you know that there's a great book available about how and why to listen to your instincts. It's called The Gift of Fear, by Gavin de Becker, if you are a reading kinda guy. I recommend it. https://www.amazon.com/Gift-Fear-Survival-Signals-Violence/dp/0440226198/ref=asc_df_0440226198/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312142103956&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=296801871825249699&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1024453&hvtargid=pla-436387740663&psc=1
  40. 2 points
    Fire damage? Did someone say fire damage? I had friday off work and planned to go backpacking. By the time I hit the trailhead, it was already quite hot and very buggy. Too hot for the bug jacket, too buggy not to wear it, so I punted. On the way back home I decided to fish a few places then got the idea to look for the lower end of an abandoned trail. One of my other (non-bigfoot) hobbies is retracing abandoned trails (with GPS) before they are lost to history. This is the fringe of an area shown on some maps as the "Oregon Desert". It burned in the 2017 Blanket Creek Fire which eventually wiped out over 30,000 acres. I was searching for the Dry Creek Trail, abandoned probably in the 1960s or 1970s, which had connected to the old Oregon Skyline Trail that was abandoned in favor of the then new Pacific Crest Trail in 1972. The PCT lies beyond the mountains in the background. The O-S-T began on this side and crossed over the saddle near the snow on the ridge. I found 2 boot tracks, very old, back in there. I also found one slightly larger track showing 5 toes. Both were pretty weathered. I never did find the trail. Dry Creek Trail was on my GPS and I went to the precise location where it showed, set a place mark, and came home. Turns out to be 0.2 miles from where I was able to locate the Dry Creek Trail visually from satellite maps. Don't trust your GPS too much. It will find specific locations if you have precise coordinates but the maps aren't that accurate. I can find a placemark I have set. I can't count on the accuracy of the maps to provide those precise coordinates. Anyway, yep, fire. We're getting big fires and they seem to be getting worse as things get drier each year and heavy timber weakened by drought becomes more susceptible to beetle-kill combining to make things more volatile than they've been in recorded history. MIB
  41. 2 points
    Have you ever packed stock? Space and weight is limited. One pack horse supporting two men and two horses. That’s traveling light. So is taking a single cab stock truck to California. Stock, Wall tent, stove, cots, sleeping bags, horse feed, food, saddles, pack saddle, panniers, lanterns, saw, axe, shovel, etc, etc. Plus a camera and some film? Tall order. I think they went in looking to film GOOD tracks. I don’t think they had enough film to shoot a 3 week expedition. If you shot 4 hours a day for 21 days? How many feet of film is that? And what if they had shot all or most of the film up filming mountains and trees? And then encountered Patty? We may not have any film note worthy at all? I wasnt there. And I’m a generation behind. The packing game hasn’t changed a bit in 100 years. But a modern diesel pickup and a big horse trailer? Big difference. Gopros, drones and SD cards? Light years difference. I could document a three week pack trip today. No sweat. But I would need 2 pack horses or mules to support me and my saddle mount. Feed is a BIG issue. Is there meadows I can hobble and graze my stock? Or do I need to pack enough groceries for 3 - 1200 lbs animals for the whole trip? How many canisters of film can I take in there? Roger supposedly was packing the camera gear in his saddle bags. That’s were traditionally a packer puts his sensitive, high value, quick access items. So it makes sense. It’s also a very limited spot for gear. Packing a lot of weight across yer horses kidneys is a bad idea. It’s also hard to mount and dismount. With that said? Putting stuff in the panniers of the pack horse is how stuff gets broke. Pack horses whack trees with panniers, they don’t follow the lead rope and get wrapped around trees or refuse to cross creeks and end up upside down in them. I didn’t read this somewhere, I have lived it. Packing extra camera gear on the pack horse? I wouldn’t do it. Unless it’s in a plastic foam case. Just some food fer thought?
  42. 2 points
    Well, you never did see Andre and Patty at the same party.
  43. 2 points
    Remarkably, nobody in my family or friends where I grew up have had experiences. But, in what should be expected, my family (with the exception of my Dad, who grew up in the bayou) were all city folks from well south of good sasquatch habitat, and few were outdoors people. After living in southcentral Alaska for 45 years, I still have no friends with experiences, either, but now I think I'm north of prime sasquatch habitat. I did have an unusual discussion the other day while at fish camp. The beach was rather crowded with fishermen and families. People were doing whatever while waiting for a fishable tide. A pickup truck pulled up near my camp with a man driving and a woman passenger. They parked and were just watching the activities and looking out over the beach. I was walking by and said hi. We started talking about the fishing and whatever. We introduced ourselves. They were both Alaska Natives from Kenny Lake, but who now lived in the Kasilof area. The conversation included discussion about the village of Chitina, another popular salmon fishery area on the Copper River near Kenny Lake. Then, out of the blue, the woman asked me if I "believed in Bigfoot". That probably got a smile. They then tell me that they both saw one walking the river flats above the Chitina bridge over the Copper River. He went on about being a river float guiding operator on the Tonsina River for a number of years and how that river was rather spooky. I thought that was rather interesting, especially after the fascinating story another Kenny Lake resident wrote about on the Alaska Outdoor Forums several years ago and which I pasted here on the forum here: Apparently Kenny Lake (a very small village) is a bigfoot believing area..........
  44. 2 points
    Yes, absolutely. There was a small group of friends that met a couple times a year in various states for bigfoot-related campouts and occasionally went to conventions as well. I was able to break away to join them maybe once a year. The last time was Idaho (SWWASAS mentioned that) but I'm in touch with most of them still. I think that was 2015. Times change, life changes, people who once gathered instead scatter. MIB
  45. 2 points
    Here's a report from the same area: https://www.oregonbigfoot.com/report_detail.php?id=5180 This was about 2 or 3 miles from where we were. This is one of my fave stories, since I'm running around exactly there on occassion. Here's another: http://www.gcbro.com/ORlane0007.html
  46. 2 points
    Can anyone imagine how fascinating it would be to have Jung involved in Bigfoot research? That would be the ultimate reality show. He could have different guests as he explores hot spots. Dr. J: "did you hear that? That was a Bigfoot for sure" Jung; " no my boy, that was a spotted owl. Tell me about your mother.... What was your relationship like?" Mike Paterson: "Did you hear that? That sounded like Nephatia' Jung: "no my boy, that was that fellow over there hanging outside a window. Tell me, have you ever consumed psychedelic mushrooms?" The possibilities are endless for guest appearances.
  47. 2 points
    Maybe that’s how they get those eyes glowin. Green could mean fully charged all the way down to that Dang Red Low Battery Eyeball Power Again?! Gotta hit up one of them electrical doodads again... 🙈
  48. 2 points
    I'm pretty sure a Bigfoot skull is many times the volume of a human skull. Not sure about brain size though.
  49. 2 points
    The Laverty part of the PG film story is among the most interesting of all. He was the only government official involved, he had prior experience with a nest and footprints, his, private photos got into the public sphere almost immediately, yet he has remained very quiet about his side of the event. Laverty had heard of the filming while off for the weekend in Eureka, and on their way back to work, he went to the site and took the photos. It is clear that he was a "bleever", and he was wise to remain quiet about his opinions. His career turned out very successfully. AFAIC, "no evidence" strongly indicates no dead sasquatches. I have no reason on Earth to believe his story at all.
  50. 2 points
    Bigfoot is big. Bigfoot is everywhere in society one looks these days. Medical devices, music bands, oil rigs, publishers, and many other things carry either the name Sasquatch or Bigfoot. If I was a person who was going to ride the wave and do it by jumping on with a product to sell but didn't want to worry about product performance then selling the paranormal would be a safe bet. Can't prove anything, don't have to prove anything. Telepathy with cats, mice, dogs, elephants, Bigfoot? Sure, why not. Folks are suggestible and may are ripe for the paranormal pickings by those who know how to wave the carrot in just the right way. Just follow the pattern of keeping things out of reach and making folks feel inadequate for not being "advanced" enough to connect with a Bigfoot, or a ghost, or a cat or the soul of their pet hamster. But none of it is worth the effort if one cannot make money selling the intangible. In other words, no science is needed and I'm sure there is a smugness about talking up something that science has no handle on in order to prove. It has been this way for eons. My point is HOW does one weed out the crop of Bigfoot so-called psychics? They all say pretty much the same thing so what makes one stand out among the rest. How does one conduct themselves in order to sell their books and garner followers- because there will be followers. And this goes to the heart of intent. Learning how to talk the psychic talk is easy. Then all one has to do is tell someone they don't need to go look for the creature outside of sitting in their armchair and communing with the mind of Bigfoot. And if they try it and nothing happens? Don't worry, just buy the book or attending the conference and one will get to KNOW what it's like when someone DOES have the gift........Snake Oil. I am sorry I have an open mind but I will not accept the influx of large numbers of Bigfoot psychics without a suspicious eye on Human nature's willingness to shake down the public. The Raels and the Billy Meiers of the world are real and out there snaring the gullible with hoaxes and scams. The 20th century may have be the worst of the modern Dark Ages. The Dark Ages of Bigfootery are now here because Bigfoot is the new big sell on the block. I don't wish to single out anyone but if I did I couldn't swing a dead cat these days without hitting a Bigfoot psychic or their website......or their book.
This leaderboard is set to New York/GMT-04:00
×
×
  • Create New...