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  1. I haven't really found any 'good' examples in our recordings I love, but here's another example of what we call jibberish. It was recorded back in 2012 as well. The audio comes from a DVR surveillance system I was trying to leave running 24/7 so when our host would tell us he'd heard activity back at the camp area I would be able to get to camp and review the DVR system on my next visit, to confirm or not if his report was accurate. The DVR and cameras were running on 12vdc from a battery bank I have in the camper bathtub and were kept hot all the time with 3 solar panels I have on the roof. The crappy thing about this recording is that I wasn't there so the system was running on the 12vdc power (since no generator was running) yet somehow there's a nasty AC interference in the audio. Some (not all) of the bullet style cameras had those built-in cheap mics in their plastic housings. That is what captured the audio here. This occurred about 2am and was heard live in real time by a couple staying in camp that weekend. Unbeknownst to them, about 20 minutes before this recording from the DVR (they were camped in a tent about 30 - 40 feet to the west of the camper) a Sony recorder that had been placed in a tree 75+ feet north of the main campsite had been approached, sniffed, fawned over, then ripped out of the tree it was hanging in. It wasn't until the morning that when it was found missing, a circular search around the area found it about 20' from where it had been hanging and the audio was reviewed. Based on the audio time-stamps of both recordings, this was 20'ish minutes after, and the BF approached their tent from the south (having circled around?) and gave them this berating. The rest of the night was silent. Hopefully you can hear the jibberish well enough over the odd interference in the audio. may-30-2012-200am-5302012 DVR audio.mp3
    6 points
  2. Edited to Add: Yes, I absolutely believe the Sierra Sounds are real. I may have shared these before, but they have some verbalization in them. I probably have some better examples I'll have to go look for. These took place in June of 2012. We had gone down for the night by maybe 1:30am, then at 2:24am something started to move in behind camp. These were recorded on a Zoom H2 about 75 - 80 feet east of my camper, under an oak tree. The vocalists were both west and south of camp. This lasted in spurts from 2:24am until right about 5am. The first clip is a condensed edit (removed dead air to keep it from being unnecessarily long) from 2:24am thru 2:30am. The second clip is roughly from 2:30 - 2:50 - condensed with dead time removed. If I can find some better examples of hearing them 'talk', I'll add it later. extended-vocal-display-1.mp3 extended-vocal-display-2.mp3 extended-vocal-display-3.mp3
    6 points
  3. Ok here they are. I hope this better helps with the context of how i explained the situation in the quoted post.
    5 points
  4. Got away to go wolf hunting today. Saw lots of loggers and deer hunters. And one spot were a rabbit got whacked. Nada on the return calls. Hopefully I didn't spoil anyones deer hunt. Blazer did awesome. Other than constantly turning the hubs in and out. I forget how good a mechanical 4x4 actually is. It just chugs along.
    5 points
  5. Monday was my last day of powerlining for a while, about 20 miles north of Terrace, BC. Checked out some nearby rec sites at the end of the day. First three are Kitsumkalum Lake and the large black bear tracks found there. Tip of pinky to tip of thumb about 7" in that picture. Last is Red Sand Lake. Nicest lake beach I've ever seen in my life.
    5 points
  6. This looks interesting. What do you think?
    5 points
  7. This is incredible! I have heard this numerous times, especially that gibbon-like "chirping" before the grumbling. One thing that I notices from what I have heard around the US in person and from audio like this is that there seems to be a common "voice" to all of it. I would call it like a giant angry goblin voice even when they are speaking clearly, if that makes sense. But as far as my answer to the thread goes, I have heard similar talking to the Sierra sounds multiple times, one time it was probably not further than 50 feet from me, there was thick brush separating us but it was still extremely powerful and easy to hear. It was two of them talking back and forth, one a very large male voice and another almost kiddish, clearly much smaller. The voices didn't have as strong of a "oriental twang" to them that I heard though that there was with the ones in the Sierra Sounds. It was very clear non garbled speech and went on for a few minutes. I have heard it in small bursts, including whispers at night, in several places since then but in my experience hearing speech is very rare, I think they only do it when people aren't around that they know of.
    5 points
  8. I did .. maybe better. I deleted it. I didn't recognize it for what it was at the time, I thought it was humans .. Asians of some sort by the language, pre-puberty boys from the pitch, so I deleted it to have room on my recorder in case something interesting happened. It wasn't 'til later when I got to thinking about context that my interpretation fell apart. Last week of bow elk season, a little snow at 6500 feet, 3 boys that age, no parents, 5 brutal miles hiking each direction, and no other cars at the parking lot. Doesn't prove anything but it certainly puts my initial assumption into doubt. I had over 20 minutes of audio. Had. :( MIB
    5 points
  9. Indeed, including on Scorpion Ridge, right above the Bluff Creek PG film site. Rob Alley reported a nest that was photographed on Prince of Wales Island in Alaska. It was reported to the Alaska Fish and Game biologist for the area, and there were both hair and scat samples taken from the site.
    4 points
  10. There are at least 3 kinds of huckleberry across the areas I roam. I grew up with evergreen huckleberry in the coast range and lower, wetter parts of the inland / Cascades: Vaccinium ovatum Where I started deer hunting it was usually the understory below tan oak .. tan oaks were thought to be ice age relics related to southeast Asian species rather than American oaks until pretty recently. When mixed with salal and Oregon grap, the combination is known by several names which include colorful and profuse profanity among loggers, hunters, etc. It is pretty nightmarish to try to get through. The areas where they overlap typically get 100 inches or more of rain in a year but it all falls in 6 months so you're either soaked to the bone or fighting impossibly noisy conditions ... there's a good reason for it to be bigfoot cover!! At higher elevations in the Cascade range we have (tah dah!!!) Cascade huckleberry: Vaccinium deliciosum In some areas, in between but overlapping both, we'll find "red huck": Vaccinium parvifolium . Where found with Cascade huckleberry there is also usually snowberry and both are roughly mid-shin in height in those locations. In other areas like along the McKenzie river / highway 242 going to McKenzie Pass it gets somewhat bigger. Being Thanksgiving tomorrow, I should add that all 3 make the most incredible pies you'll ever eat if done right. And to keep it on bigfoot, my research area in the cascade smells like a cooking pie at the end of berry season when it's still hot enough to release the scent of the fallen, uneaten berries. MIB
    4 points
  11. I think I have mentioned this, but the trackway I found back in '74 lead out of the river, across a mud-covered rocky shelf, up a very steep clay bank, and into a horrific evergreen huckleberry "jungle". It was previously logged, naturally reseeded, and grew back to a mass of mid-sized Douglas fir overstory with an understory of incredibly dense huckleberry and blackberry. It very much resembled the original OP site / approach path the team used as depicted in video. I've also uncovered 2 reports from hunters in the Oregon Coast Range of nest-like structures on the ground made of evergreen huckleberry in locations similar to the OP original site in that they were above smaller of a main river, tributaries where salmon spawn. I do not think this is as unique as it initially appeared, it's just so forbidding people don't generally go into those places so they don't find the nests. It makes me think of a couple of other locations I should check .. would check if I were a little nearer with younger legs. MIB
    4 points
  12. Some fall pictures from WV.
    4 points
  13. The Sionyx doesn’t have a built in IR Illuminator. It gets a bit awkward trying to attach one using a camcorder mount or trying to carry one separately. We are experimenting with a new setup. We modified a Magpul MOE rail attachment to go onto the tripod mount at the bottom of the Sionyx. We then mounted a 940nm IR flashlight to the rail. Hopefully, this will be a much handier unit. This will give us further reaching adjustable illumination while being a lot easier to use on the move. We will see how it works out this weekend.
    4 points
  14. https://www.olympicproject.com/heads-up-evaluating-bigfootage-plausibility-at-a-glance/?fbclid=IwAR0thmmh17I5SJJQA3Fdgva4KGLP_5LMIzRyQnez05cJUE0JDHqJgTMZCvk
    4 points
  15. The human family tree is a messy bush.
    4 points
  16. Yes, 'tis the season. Today I got out to the valley where I had my experiences over 40 years ago, and found cold rain at the low end and heavy, wet snow at the higher elevations. Several other 4x4s were in the valley, and all I saw was dog and human tracks. I did find a pretty sturdy lean to shelter at the end of a branch road, next to a roaring creek.
    4 points
  17. I couldn't resist. I have to do this for Norseman. Quoting Norseman; "I agree and would go further and say that video and photo evidence 50 YEARS ago did not move the chains one inch. And nothing has changed now. They need a chunk of the critter." 'The chains have not moved'. That is funny to use 'football speak'. Kodak designed and built the K-100 series to film football games. An interesting filming aid was available. The angle selector is placed 40 yards from the side line and shows the angle of view for the 15mm and 25mm lenses. Note that a display for a 20mm lens is not included.
    4 points
  18. That is more or less my plan for the next go-around .. if I remember to do it. The strategy is to just sit down. It is both refusing to flee and giving up the option of attack. It is willingness to accept the situation, manage the fear (if any), and put the choice of outcome in their hands. There is a component of "put up or shut up" to it. It could backfire badly or it could be absolutely perfect. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I have the crackpot idea that scared humans are dangerous. MIB
    4 points
  19. I'm in West Virginia cruising to a fire watch tower at the top of the mountain, its very foggy here. I want to put some audio recorders there next spring.
    4 points
  20. Saturday, November 27, 2021. About 40 degrees, slight wind, cloudy and overcast, occasional light rain. Mud. NorthWind and I headed out to follow up on a Class-A report from a local we met at a small town gas station last week. We drove way up into the hills - very, very wild looking. Hard to believe we were 10 miles from a little town! True, this little town is in the middle of nowhere in the Oregon Cascades, but wow. Anyway, the road was rough, had to use 4wd in places - and then ran the ridge line for a few miles with a several hundred foot drop-off on one side and a 4,000 foot drop-off on the other! Maybe not quite, but close. No sign of any bigfoots. We got to the top and walked a trail for a few hundred yards, but nothing to report. Might be a good place for an overnight, if the coming winter snows allow. Maybe in NW's future Jeep! Anyway, we were above the clouds and it was beautiful. We got down lower and walked through this brushy part and had lunch under the trees. Nothing there either, except for elk poop and old mushrooms. A nice day in the woods. You can see a reservoir wayyy down there. Here's the ridgeline. Wow! That was a drive. I did not take pix when it truly got skinny and had the drop offs. I wanted to get through it, LOL. But you get the idea.
    3 points
  21. Not a lot of times I agree with your position, but you nailed this one!
    3 points
  22. VA, you and I were on the same wave length on the 16th. I had an idea so I pm'd treeman on that same day. treeman, hopefully something will work out for you in December; ideally somewhere around Christ's 40 Acres since large tracks have been found there.
    3 points
  23. That is false. I assume you read my posts? There absolutely ARE other nests being reported and have been for a long time, they're just not as well known as the OP nests and have not gotten the same level of investigation. As Huntster says, private land is a problem. Military would not be conducting operations on private land without permission.
    3 points
  24. .....well thanks for the nightmares, bud....
    3 points
  25. A few points need to be made: 1. Obviously any new species will not have DNA sequences in the NCBI database, GenBank. But new species, occasionally a primate, are discovered, and their DNA is sequenced all the time. Recognition by science is based on a number of factors: photo and/or video evidence, a holotype specimen with carefully described morphology which differs significantly from all other species, behavior characteristics, range, AND a phylotree of related species, including the new one, that makes sense. The relation to known species (through a DNA based phylotree) is important. 2. One needs information on the specific technique Disotell used to be able to evaluate his comments such as "the DNA was too degraded." The entire Neanderthal genome was sequenced from HIGHLY degraded DNA. Also DNA is purposefully degraded (broken up) in some sequencing techniques (results are then reassembled later). 3, As a donor to the Meldrum/Disotell Project I was promised access to the results. I have seen nothing, and doubt anything formal was produced. I will inquire about this. Anybody here seen anything written? 4. See https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0044271 for a very good article on the discovery of a new species of monkey. Note the phylotrees (also called phylograms) in the figures and that much more additional factors were involved in describing this monkey as a unique species.
    3 points
  26. It’s officially winter. A blizzard here today. The elk are back on the deer blind. Yesterday I saw a bull and 4 cows. The Blazer is back with a new transfer case! Gets around great!
    3 points
  27. I added this to some of the Small Town Monsters stuff they've been using as promo to push the documentary i the past few days..;) ---- I’ve waited a while to post this one. On November 16th, @small_town_monsters released their much coveted and most recent ‘On the trail of Bigfoot’ documentary, ‘The Discovery’ (Available Now, on Amazon). One of the many big questions to come from it was ‘Why ?’. Why would something build a nest where it did, and why would they build a nest with what they did ? All (20+) Olympic Project nests found so far were made with Evergreen Hucklberry (Vaccinium Ovatum), a species of Huckleberry that has pretty unique medicinal values. The Evergreen Huckleberry, also known as the Californian, Florist’s, Shot and Winter Huckleberry is one of only 3 out of 26 Vaccinium species in North America that can be used as a ‘birthing aid’ where its medicinal purpose is concerned. ‘An infusion of the leaves and sugar have been given to a mother after childbirth to help her regain her strength.’ Could this be the ‘Why ?’ that these nests are built out of what they are ? In some Native languages the term for plants translates to “those who take care of us.’ Food for thought, and maybe for other reasons too !
    3 points
  28. I went up into the Idaho mountains earlier this afternoon to do a video review of my UTV for my YouTube channel. I was in the area for about 2 hours and did not see another human. I parked at the trailhead, unloaded my UTV, and then proceeded up the trail for my video. I went about half a mile and discovered that the area had been heavily logged and the trail destroyed. So I spent the next hour or so doing different takes, different camera shots, etc. I returned back down to my 4Runner and backed the UTV onto the trailer and shut it off. As soon as I got out of the trailer, I hear a whistle about 15-20 yards away coming from the deep timber right behind the trail sign. This sounded EXACTLY like a human doing a quick whistle to get someone's attention. My initial reaction was embarrassment that I was there for awhile and didn't see or hear someone approaching. I looked in that direction and expected a hunter or hiker to come out of the woods. But there was nobody there. I started strapping down the UTV nervously, with the hair on the back of neck standing up due to the feeling that I was being watched. I kept trying to process what I had just heard. Could it be someone messing with me? No vehicles in the area, and the only trail between my vehicle and the woods beyond was the one I just spent an hour on that was blocked off from the other end. What's the chance that a human would be miles from his vehicle, 10 yards into the brush from a trail sign, just sitting there for hours waiting for someone to stop so he could whistle at them and not reveal himself? What about an animal making the noise? I have heard every single animal and bird noise in these woods and have never heard an animal make a human sounding whistle. In my review video of the UTV, you can hear a very loud bird call in the woods. That is a very common bird call and I believe it is of a certain species of woodpecker. The whistle I heard was NOT a bird, or a fox, or a cougar, or a deer. Here's my video of trying to figure out what it was...
    3 points
  29. This is an amplified version of a recorded but distant sound capture. Included are some gutterals, a whoop, some extreme bass sounds that recreate what it must sound like to bounce a heavy dumpster down a rocky creekbed or asphalt road, etc Permission given by former BFF member River to use for research purposes and @southernyahooassisted with retrieval of the file from the dustbin of our minds. Amped version provided through audacity as earbuds/ headphones are required to really hear some of the nuances even with that. riverscohuttafilengaamped.mp3
    3 points
  30. LMAO....OK this was a top 3 'weird experiences while hiking' today during my lunch break. I decided to head over to that area for the tree-break pics, and walked up on about 30 zombies!! Yep, hiked up the backside of a movie set and filming, the zombie dudes were either being cool or they thought I was cast and were coming at me all gimpy & creepy. The film guys were not at all happy! They are filming 'Fear the Walking Dead', search it, they are in Lago Vista, ha. I'll go back later in the week, wonder what the hairyman thinks of these guys?
    3 points
  31. School me please. I've never heard that before. Ravens have been around for at least 2 million years. Ravens as spies goes way back to Norse folk lore. Ravens would spy and report back to Odin. Indigenous peoples of North America and First Nations of Canada ( keeping north of the Mexican Ravens ) have always kept Ravens in high regard as smart, clever and sometimes tricksters as when 'Raven stole the Sun'. There are several sayings about Ravens and predators. Every Raven has a bear and a cougar. Every bear has a Raven. Every cougar has a Raven. Ravens need predators to rip open a carcass. Ravens will lead predators to breakfast, lunch and dinner. A Raven, squawking overhead may be giving away your location or warning you that a bear or cougar is close by. If predators are not in close proximity, why do Ravens follow humans? I do not have Purina Raven Chow to hand out but I am followed. Could be that they are placing dibs on my eyeballs. I have some experiments for Ravens that I will try in Nov. and Dec. I could get snowed out though.
    3 points
  32. Kodak never planned for a 20mm lens to be used on it's K-100 model. They selected lenses based on specific uses. The 25mm standard is good for general filing of human activity, and can do close ups of a person as needed. The 15mm is the wide angle lens for panoramic scenery mostly. The 50mm and up are the telephoto lenses for sports (as noted above, for filming football games) and nature photography (filming animals from afar and bringing them up close on film). So Kodak chose the specific lenses and made specific viewer companion lenses for only the lenses they expected the camera operator to need. The 20mm lens was an archaic lens from a camera made 20 plus years earlier. It was intended for viewing human activity and scenic landscapes both, so it split the focal length between the 25mm and the 15mm. It's non-focusing, so it was never expected to shoot close ups of people or things. Now, why might Roger put a 20mm lens on his K-100 camera. The standard 25mm lens was a bit too narrow for what he expected to film, as he knew he'd be outdoors and filming the scenery as much as filming his and Bob's activity. So Roger might have thought he's like to go a bit wider than the 25mm lens allows, but not full wide as the 15mm produces. We can only speculate, of course, first that Roger was sufficiently knowledgeable in lenses to make that decision, and second, to know the 20mm was available, but evaluating his other documentary footage, he did use an Angineaux 12mm-120mm zoom lens, so he had the chance to see how various focal lengths work for various situations. So he may have shot with the zoom lens set at 20mm or so, and realized it was a useful focal length for his purposes. And it would have been a reasonable assumption for the same camera shop that rented him his K-100 may have stocked a Model E camera as well, and thus had a 20mm on hand to rent out.
    3 points
  33. Thank you all so much for responding. That was very informative. The reason I ask is being an ardent skeptic and mostly dismissing Sasquatch evidence. I have always been interested in sounds that can't be explained. Anyway,after much research and collaboration with fellow scientists without going into more explanation. I must admit I was wrong about the Sierra Sounds. I have reluctantly concluded and now after many years believing them to be hoaxed by humans. They are made by unidentified undocumented animals.
    3 points
  34. For those of you that have observed these creatures, have you ever heard them make sounds similar to the infamous Sierra Sounds?
    2 points
  35. Except for lighting and wiring it’s close!
    2 points
  36. That ridgeline was hairy! Really steep on both sides. The woods were creepy as heck, too. Just ominous. It was still fun though!
    2 points
  37. You can put the 35s on with the mods I spoke of, you're going to have to do them anyway, unless Jeep has addressed those issues...I did and it actually looked very cool and performed well, just don't go all crazy wheeling till you lift it. Go with a complete engineered kit, from one manufacturer, depending on how much lift you're going with, things can get really expensive in regards to other mods that should be done to account for the lift, different drive shafts, exhaust clearance issues......it never ends. My lift was only a 2.5" kit but with the tires, it netted an almost 6" increase overall, the lift kit alone was closer to 4". My build was more of a rock crawler build, so low center of gravity and high articulation is what I was shooting for. One thing that you rarely hear discussed on the Jeep forums, is some unsettling things happen from an aerodynamic point of view when you lift a vehicle that is basically a brick to being with. There seems to be some weird air packing issues in the front at certain times, I've always believed that this is some of the reason for the death wobble issues, though most of that was related to bolt issues that the factory would not own up too. My Jeep never had death wobble, but you could definitely feel the front end unweight at certain times, but this could be because of the compliant spring and shock package for the rock crawler set up. Funny that you're headed in the Jeep direction and I'm headed back to a truck, currently building a F250 Overland/Apocalypse rig, if I can help in anyway just let me know, building them is half the fun!
    2 points
  38. No. I remember a bear that broke into Auto Electric in Anchorage one night near where I worked at the time for the Alaska Railroad. Authorities believed that he saw his image in the window, attacked it, and broke the glass. He then entered and raided the employees refrigerator in the break room. After enjoying the leftovers and condiments, he took a dump on the floor, and left the way he entered.
    2 points
  39. I'll donate one and three trail cameras to film it.
    2 points
  40. Check with OkieFoot. Not sure if he is in the area, but I bet he might know some places you could go. If you are willing to drive a bit, try the Blowing Rock area or SW VA.
    2 points
  41. http://www.sci-news.com/othersciences/anthropology/homo-bodoensis-10217.html “Homo bodoensis lived in Africa during the early Middle Pleistocene, around 500,000 years ago, and was the direct ancestor of the Homo sapiens lineage; however, this species was not the most recent common ancestor of Eurasian (Neanderthals and Denisovans) and African (Homo sapiens) hominins.”
    2 points
  42. I disagree, Bill. Roger's primary concern, on his trip to Bluff Creek, was filming a sasquatch. And substituting a 20MM lens for a 25MM lens would serve to diminish what he was hoping to do....get convincing footage of the creatures. The wider-angle lens reduces the subject's apparent size, on the film. With the 20MM lens...Roger would be 'zooming-out', instead of zooming-in, on his elusive target. And I don't think he would have chosen to do that.
    2 points
  43. @bipedalist, here's the two links to the Reo vids. And I'll tt I'll try to find the timestamp where I heard the same sound. But I'll have to watch them both first, because I don't remember when it was.
    2 points
  44. Backdoc: In answer to your question, in theory (in the perfect world), doing lens tests on site at Bluff Creek would be ideal, from a research standpoint. However, in practice, the setting has changed so much, it is unlikely that doing any test research filming there will yield an ideal result. The new growth obscuring the view from Roger's filming position, plus the fact his exact position is now about 10 feet up in the air, due to heavy erosion, makes replicating his footage unlikely (putting it mildly). Using a replica environment is the more pragmatic solution if it is accurately reconstructed from the extensive survey work done on site. But such replication is costly, so the issue of cost is a significant factor. Either approach has issues that challenge the effort. So there is no perfect solution. Thus any researcher looking to experiment must weigh these challenges of each approach and select the one that researcher can best manage. Bill
    2 points
  45. Primarily in the Southwestern tip of Virginia but I spent several years researching in the Croatan National Forest when I was in the Marines. I will be spending this week in the Kiamichi mountains and next week likely will be in northern Virginia. I am going to put those laminated pictures and some other things in the woods and periodically check on them! I travel alot, I had been very private about my research for years but now want to go public and start actively networking with other researchers and exploring new areas, it's more fun that way!
    2 points
  46. If you only get one shot, yes, bigger seems better. But here's another quote from Clint Smith: If I can get it in my hand and hang on to it, I can fire it. Even inside a collapsed tent in the dark with a bear on it. With a handgun, especially if your attacker is an animal, the most critical aspect is getting it your hand and it fires immediately with trigger pulls. Unlike a human attacker armed with a firearm, an animal must be literally on you. Under such circumstances, if the gun is in your hand, and it isn't a manual single action, you can fire it. A double action revolver works well., but you're limited to 5-7 rounds. The Glock 10mm features a safe striker fire action and a full 16 rounds of hard hitting energy more powerful than the 357 mag out of full 6" barrel, and nearly as powerful as the old 41 magnum. Out of the box, the best lights attach right on, and tritium night sights can be bought for less than $100 and installed with just a small hammer and punch. The gun (comes with two magazines), a Surefire light, a set of tritium sights, an extended magazine release, two more magazines (for anti-personnel ammo for easy & quick conversion), and an Alaska Gear bandolier holster will cost @ $1000. Empty, it weighs over a pound less than the empty Toklat, and it's much less bulky. And when not in the wilderness, and loaded with easier shooting Hornady Critical Defense 180 grain hollow points, it also serves extremely well as an anti personnel sidearm. There's a YouTube video that will take you, step-by-step, through the "25 Cent Glock Trigger Job", an easy smooth and tune job that only requires a few q-tips and some rubbing compound. Sixteen rounds. And reloading is quick and easy, even in the dark, and by a wounded, traumatized man. The 454 Casull 335 gr WFNGC DoubleTap round produces 1800 ft. lbs energy........x6 = 10,600 ft. lbs. The 10mm Underwood 200 gr FMJ produces 694 ft. lbs energy.......x16 = 11,104 ft. lbs. Thought of another way, 694 x 15 = 10,410.........and saving one for yourself in case you're so broke up you don't want to go through the misery of recovery. In years past, Alaskans packed big revolvers. Not anymore. You'll see ten Glock 20's for every revolver you see out there. I'll never get rid of my 44 mag, and as late as this past spring I still mount it on my snowmobile for aggressive moose (I might switch that to the Glock, too) but as a sidearm during the rest of the year, and especially during the night in my tent, the Glock is the weapon for me.
    2 points
  47. I had a decent blobsquatch photo of the one who yelled at me, and I wiped the screen to show it to a friend.... and deleted it. I just about had a coronary; I was sooo mad. Fortunately, I had emailed it to myself just in case, so I had a back up - but the resolution was not as good as the original. I'm not good with tech. I'd have had a better video of our sighting, too, if I'd known where the FLIR freakin' record button was, too. And don't even ask me about the audio recorder I dropped in the creek/waterfall not 10 minutes after telling NorthWind to remind me not to lose it. Or not taking a picture of the "person/creature" standing in the culvert, because we couldn't decide what it was. Stuff happens. The interesting stuff happens so fast... it's amazing that we get anything good.
    2 points
  48. It is very frustrating. One has to be ready every second as the opportunity is fleeting you may miss it. A month, or so ago, I was doing an overnight with a friend and we heard a few barred owls call. Immediately thereafter, and no more than 100 yards from us, I heard a distinct and very loud whistle where I could hear breath coming from it. It was not a bird whistle. Naturally, I tired to retrieve my audio recorder that has a 15-second buffer but I got to it too late. I then reached for my thermal but whatever made the noise was gone. It never seems to fail.
    2 points
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